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  1. #1
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    1989 Savage Test Ride

    Currently doing a shake down of the Savage Terminator. First impression, it rides really well on fire road. It's confidence inspiring on fast flat turns.



    The front wheel is well planted, I can get a really good position on bike with the short stem. Centered while having my feet and elbows well forward.

    In undulating smooth trails, she rails. On ruts and ditches, the 69 degree head angle helped the tire roll over stuff. Never felt it stick on anything. Very nice.



    Jumps, well, its rigid, it kinda caught me by surprise. The bike slams into you if you plow into a lip without proper technique. No you don't press into the ramp, doh. Gotta take the jump in a bit, legs bent or else you launch off of those suckers. It took me a few jumps to figure it out. Take in the jump or its Redbull Stratos time.



    Landing full rigid wasn't bad. Actually, it was pretty smooth. I get more jarring from bunny hops, surprisingly.

    Climbing, I'd say good to excellent. Climbing the steeps only required a bit of elbows out, not too much saddle repositioning nor much body english.

    Now, the weak spots. I hadn't completely acclimated to this bike and my last ride was on my AM ride. Hydros to cantis..... getting my drift. I dove down the first descent and grabbed brake right in the middle.

    Uh, I'm not stopping. One, two, three............. help. My subconscious kicks in and my middle finger and ring fingers creep up off the bar and grabs the lever. Only then did I begin to slow.

    One finger won't cut it! Actually even two or three. If I let the bike go and let it roll down descents like I usually do, over a certain speed, these canti's will take 2 seconds before they start to grab. Even then it gets sketchy with the tires skittering over slate. Seriously considering junking the Ritchey pads for some Koolstops. I don't remember my Wicked having the same brake lag. On these babys, if you go past a certain speed, you just have to commit. You have no choice.


    The only other thing that surprised me is that I didn't know my usual trail had brake bumps. Brakes bumps are hell on full rigid. Those little 2 inch bumps feel like they came up from the earth through your frame and put a jack hammer to your balls. After a couple of testicular numbing encounters, I started to brake for brake bumps.



    No apparent bb flexing was observed. Pedaling felt efficient, and the frame fit very well.

    Over all, I was pleasantly satisfied with my new bike.



    Ive got a MAG 20 in 1 inch in the garage. I'm really tempted to put that thing on and just rip with the beast. Gonna figure out the braking situation first Later.
    Last edited by bing!; 10-19-2012 at 03:04 PM.

  2. #2
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    That bike is growing on me, I woud venture to guess the Ritchey pads are fine but the lackk of braking power would go to those brake levers. They are nice but flexy, probably suited for a fly weight bike not a burly trail bike. IIRC Ritchey pads were made by Kool Stop.

  3. #3
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne View Post
    Needs a quill stem

    And those Kooka levers are the opposite of "all mountain"
    Quote Originally Posted by chefmiguel View Post
    That bike is growing on me, I woud venture to guess the Ritchey pads are fine but the lackk of braking power would go to those brake levers. They are nice but flexy, probably suited for a fly weight bike not a burly trail bike. IIRC Ritchey pads were made by Kool Stop.
    But they're banza.

  4. #4
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    The levers didnt feel like they were flexing, but I will put on the Dia Compe's to compare. I don't know everything, nor much at all Always willing to learn.

    I do suspect though that muscle memory could play a part in my brake dilema. Riding hyrdos for the most part of the year, I think my fingers need to learn to put out more force than my brain expects to use. Later in the ride, I was able to lock up the brakes reliably.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing! View Post
    The levers didnt feel like they were flexing, but I will put on the Dia Compe's to compare. I don't know everything, nor much at all Always willing to learn.

    I do suspect though that muscle memory could play a part in my brake dilema. Riding hyrdos for the most part of the year, I think my fingers need to learn to put out more force than my brain expects to use. Later in the ride, I was able to lock up the brakes reliably.
    dia compes won't cut it; get some shimano slr levers.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    dia compes won't cut it; get some shimano slr levers.
    I also have a set of Maguras, and Shimano M730 4 fingers, but I don't think those are SLRs. Gonna check.

    Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Took a ride on my Wicked with Magura levers, M730 cantis and fresh Kool Stops. Same trail, one finger braking.

    Gonna put back the og Dia Compe levers, buy some kool stops and re-string the entire brake system based on Sheldon Browns recs.

    Anybody want some minty silver levers Kidding GOB.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing! View Post
    I also have a set of Maguras, and Shimano M730 4 fingers, but I don't think those are SLRs. Gonna check.

    Thanks.
    Maguras will cut it... a longer stem will help absorb trail chatter and move your weight back. Try it w/120mm stem, flat bars and move that flite 1cm back.

  9. #9
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    Problem sol-ved. I put back the original Dia Compe levers and rerouted the rear brake cable through both seat tubes, instead of how it was when I got the bike, which was through the first tube and the straddle cable around the second tube. I bought the wide Problem Solver straddle carrier and used it's low profile to get more clearance between the rear tire, the straddle carrier and the seat tube.

    I have danced with vintage weight weanie aftermarket brakes twice now, not impressed.
    Last edited by bing!; 10-25-2012 at 05:28 PM.

  10. #10
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing! View Post
    I have danced with vintage aftermarket brakes twice already, not impressed.
    It really depends on the bike and how you ride. Bombing down on a heavy tank on fireroads, you really need to think about what you're using. Those levers would have been fine on a XC bike.

    I have vintage Pauls (brakes) on a bike and they work fantastic but I rather not ride than ride fireroads.
    Last edited by girlonbike; 10-25-2012 at 04:14 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    It really depends on the bike and how you ride. Bombing down on a heavy tank on fireroads, you really need to think about what you're using. Those levers would have been fine on a XC bike.

    I have vintage Pauls (brakes) on a bike and they work fantastic but I rather not ride than ride fireroads.
    boy, heavy tank, riding fire roads, did you miss anything? I just looked at the pictures above, those don't look like fire roads to me. actually, if you look at them more closely, maybe you can appreciate the incline.

    yes, i do ride fire roads, to get to single track. thats how it is over here, fire roads provide access to trails. here is that exact descent Lower Sullivan Ridge to Horse Trail - YouTube it's not bad. I find it quite challenging.

    Something else, the pull on the Dia Compe and the Kookas were very different. At the straddle carrier, the kooka pulled the carrier by half an inch. With the dia compes, just a quarter inch. Theyre both canti lever, Veird.


    LAST UPDATE: I took the bike to Corral Canyon in Malibu. Its 100% single track with steep rocky descents and a bunch of ledge drop offs. The bike did very well in sweeping single track, launched it off water bars straight into melon sized rocks a number of times. There were a few unnerving moments, I'm just not used to dealing with this sort of terrain without suspension, but I think for what it is, it did very well. I'm so glad that I didnt ding the wheels on it. Dosing myself with advil as I type. Boy, did that hurt. Full rigid has it place, and it wasnt there.
    Last edited by bing!; 10-28-2012 at 06:19 PM.

  12. #12
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    Curtis Keens shreds same trail that the Savage conquered. Sweet.

    How to Score Speed in L.A. on a Mountain Bike | Red Bull Bike

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