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  1. #1
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    Video Shaky? How to Stabilize it!

    Hi all, you may know me, or have passed me up on the trails.. I'm just the random guy that is on a bike. Ok, yea I know.. I've been told I have a dry sense of humor.

    Anyways, the question always comes up.. "My video looks like I was riding in an earthquake, and my 'ma and 'pa keep tellin' me not to ride mah bike during dem der earthquakes".. so, here we go!

    I will be hopefully showing everyone how to at least make the shake in your videos a bit more.. or shall we say.. cause less migraines.

    I will go over a few different programs and options you can use, from Microsoft Movie Maker to Adobe After Effects. If you're a Final Cut person... get a Windows machine.

    (This thread is a work in progress that will be coming within the next couple of days due to weather here.. and will provide both written instructions as well as video tutorials for the different techniques. I credit all work to those around the interwebz who have given me the knowledge to pass down. I am not the inventor by any means).
    Last edited by RandomGuyOnABike; 04-16-2013 at 03:53 PM.

  2. #2
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    Stabilizing Videos using Microsoft Movie Maker and Virtual Dub





    edit: Sorry for the screen capture - I guess my desktop recording software doesn't like Aero :\
    Last edited by RandomGuyOnABike; 04-16-2013 at 07:40 PM.

  3. #3
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    Microsoft Movie Maker

    Needed Programs:




    Installation:
    1. Download and install Movie Maker
    2. Download the Virtual Dub zip file (32 bit)
    3. Create a new folder in C:\Program Files(x86) or C:\Program Files if you're on a 32bit machine, and name it Virtual Dub
    4. Extract the Virtual Dub files to this folder
    5. Right click on the VirtualDub executable, choose Send To -> Desktop (create shortcut)
    6. Download the Deshaker filter, and extract to your Virtual Dub/plugins folder.


    Technique:
    1. Record your video, and copy to your computer
    2. Open Virtual Dub
    3. Drag your video to the main grey area in Virtual Dub, this will open the video in it (you will probably need to download the xvid, divx, or ffdshow codecs, and convert the videos to a format that VDub will understand. For more information you can google search for it. You can use the DivX Plus Converter, free 30 day trial, which will work)
    4. Select Video, then Filters
    5. Click on Add, then on Deshaker. Click OK.
    6. Your Source Pixel Aspect Ratio should correspond to the aspect ratio of your video. More details coming soon on how to get this information
    7. Click on the Pass 1 box
    8. The default settings should be ok, but this depends on your video. It will basically balance both the speed of the filter and the quality of the filter.
    9. Click OK, and then again.
    10. At the bottom, you will see the Play button, with a 0.. click on that, and let it run through.
    11. Click on Video, and Filters (again).
    12. Double click on the Deshaker filter.
    13. Select Pass 2
    14. For Edge Compensation, choose adaptive zoom + fixed zoom (no borders).
    15. You can play around with steps 8 - 16, to see what works best for your video.
    16. Click OK, and ok again.
    17. Once the file finishes the 2nd pass, click on File, then Save as AVI. Save the deshaked video, for example: Video_deshaked.avi
    18. Open up Movie Maker, import your video, and edit away.
    19. Upload your movie to a share site to share with all of us!
    Last edited by RandomGuyOnABike; 04-16-2013 at 07:46 PM.

  4. #4
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    this one will be for the blender video tutorial
    Last edited by RandomGuyOnABike; 04-16-2013 at 03:52 PM.

  5. #5
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    and the blender written instructions.. coming "Soon to a thread near you!"

  6. #6
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    Motion Stabilization with Adobe After Effects


    Last edited by RandomGuyOnABike; 04-18-2013 at 06:20 PM.

  7. #7
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    After Effects Motion Stabilization

    Needed Programs:




    Technique:
    1. Open After Effects, Import your Video Footage
    2. Create a new composition by dragging the footage to the "Create Composition from Footage" button
    3. Open up the tracker via Motion Tracking workspace or by going to Animation -> Track Motion
    4. Click on Stabilize Motion
    5. Position the tracker to something that is always in your shot
    6. The inner square should be on the object, the outer position is the track area (This should be fairly large depending on how much shaking is going on in your video)
    7. Click Analyze forward. You may need to go frame by frame (rotoscoping FTL) and position the tracker back to the object.
    8. Once you have the tracker following the object, click Apply.
    9. Create a new null object and camera
    10. Copy the anchor point data from your footage to the anchor point of the null object (it seems you can also copy to the position)
    11. Parent the camera to the null object
    12. Select the null object, and press "A" to bring up the anchor point keyframes (or P for the position)
    13. Hold down ALT and click on the stopwatch to bring up the expression box
    14. Enter in this expression: smooth(.2,5)
    15. This says, smooth(x seconds, y samples).. the lower the time, the less the video will be smoothed (and smaller black areas).. the higher the time, the more it will be smoothed, and the larger the black areas.
    16. You can either enlarge the video footage (this can introduce pixelation if enlarged too much) or you can use a motion tile effect. I have a better way: Record footage larger than what you'll be uploading, so instead of enlarging, you can reduce the size, but keep the motion stabilization effect. (I use the latter method in the video).


    The video above is cut short.. but I was also going to show you how to use proxy footage in premiere.. ah well. A simple google search for Adobe Premiere proxy footage will show you how. If you use a proxy (which is the same footage, but rendered at a much, much smaller size and quality), you can edit / add effects / etc.. to the proxy footage and not kill your machine in the process. Once your done, select the footage in the sequence, select the larger / actual video in the project bin, and then right click the proxy footage (in the sequence), select Replace with clip, and then click on replace with bin. That will replace the edited, proxy footage, with the real footage, so you can then render. Easy as pie
    Last edited by RandomGuyOnABike; 04-18-2013 at 05:41 PM.

  8. #8
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    How about just using proper technique to capture non shaky video in the first place?

    Trying to stabilize in post just leads to even crappier video.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justsome_NICA_dad View Post
    How about just using proper technique to capture non shaky video in the first place?

    Trying to stabilize in post just leads to even crappier video.
    Unless you have some type of contraption that includes having at least 3 gyro's and counterweights that are good enough to support the light weight of most "Action Cameras", that is lightweight in itself, and can be either worn or mounted on your bike, you'll always have some shake / vibration / swaying in your video. If such a contraption does exist though, I want to buy it.

    I do agree with you to a point though. Proper shooting techniques can help alleviate most of the vibrating in videos, but not 100%. As was stated elsewhere, by someone else, "Unless you're wanting a Blair Witch feel to your video.." by even doing a little bit of post production can lead to a better, more polished, semi-professional look to it.

    Of course, if anyone has any methods for video stabilizing, please share in this thread. This could be during production or during post production. Pictures / steps are very welcome!

  10. #10
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    It is very easy with Adobe Premiere Pro using the warp stabilizer:
    Using Warp Stabilizer in Premiere Pro CS6 | Digital Video CS6 | Adobe TV

    Obviously the program usually costs $$, but if your a student you should get a discount. I got Adobe Production Premium suite for free from my university.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandomGuyOnABike View Post
    Unless you have some type of contraption that includes having at least 3 gyro's and counterweights that are good enough to support the light weight of most "Action Cameras", that is lightweight in itself, and can be either worn or mounted on your bike, you'll always have some shake / vibration / swaying in your video.
    Of course there will always be some motion with non-fixed video, heck even with handheld video.

    The point that you may be missing is that with proper technique you can capture very smooth video that does not need any work in post. And you don't need to wear a gyro-stabilized rig to capture it.

    You already have all of the stabilizing gear installed that is needed to capture smooth video (legs, arms shoulders, neck, head). You just need to use it!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justsome_NICA_dad View Post
    Of course there will always be some motion with non-fixed video, heck even with handheld video.

    The point that you may be missing is that with proper technique you can capture very smooth video that does not need any work in post. And you don't need to wear a gyro-stabilized rig to capture it.

    You already have all of the stabilizing gear installed that is needed to capture smooth video (legs, arms shoulders, neck, head). You just need to use it!
    Can you please post an original "stabilized" video of you riding DH with jumps, berms, roots, rocks, ruts, etc? Please enlighten me, because all of my GoPro videos make me sick. I wear the chesty mount, because it's kinda hard (for me at least) to do a 20ft jump with one hand.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by guppie View Post
    Can you please post an original "stabilized" video of you riding DH with jumps, berms, roots, rocks, ruts, etc? Please enlighten me, because all of my GoPro videos make me sick. I wear the chesty mount, because it's kinda hard (for me at least) to do a 20ft jump with one hand.
    I use the Chesty mount alot and you have to have the harness pretty tight to avoid alot of excessive shakiness with it. If it is loose, even a little bit, it will be shaky.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

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    I thought about this (afterwards), so I'll give it a try. Also, how do you manage to get a good view because video always points down too far due to standing/leaning forward when out of the saddle, which is alot. I was thinking of mounting the GoPro upside down but would the handlebar/stem occupy too much of the screen?
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by guppie View Post
    I thought about this (afterwards), so I'll give it a try. Also, how do you manage to get a good view because video always points down too far due to standing/leaning forward when out of the saddle, which is alot. I was thinking of mounting the GoPro upside down but would the handlebar/stem occupy too much of the screen?
    I put the GoPro upside down on the chesty mount. When you mount it upside down, angle the camera up 45 degrees and that will do the trick. You can adjust for your taste but 45 degrees for me tends to be the sweet spot.

    In that orientation, the handlebars, very little stem, and the front tire will be visible in the bottom 1/4 of the horizontal section of the video with the top 3/4 of the horizontal section being the trail and sky.

    Here is an example:

    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  16. #16
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    I cant get over how stable the video is when it's mounted to the front frame...

    Thanks for posting
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