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  1. #1
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    Vholdr Chest mount

    Is there a Vholdr chest mount available or maybe some way to make a home made one? Just curious becuase I really like that POV and now that I have a camera I would love to utilize in the videos I am going to shoot.

  2. #2
    PROEDGEBIKER.COM
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkslide18
    Is there a Vholdr chest mount available or maybe some way to make a home made one? Just curious becuase I really like that POV and now that I have a camera I would love to utilize in the videos I am going to shoot.
    closest you're going to get that view with the contourHD is by getting a Bar Mount.

  3. #3
    Tool
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    I don't have a chest-mount solution for you, but I encourage you to play around with fork and headset mounting. The fork mount is my favorite - it allows you to see what the bike is rolling over as well as the terrain ahead, and is one of the steadiest places to mount a camera (because of it's proximity to the shock itself - the more material and distance you have between the shockk and the camera, the more opportunity for vibration to be amplified).

    I use the goggle mount along with a homemade Velcro strap to mount in these locations.

    It almost goes without saying that you need to be very cautious when mounting anything near your front wheel.

    A recent fork mount example can be found here.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  4. #4
    2006 Yeti AS-X
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    Does the CounterHD have a tripod adapter? If so, you could MacGuyver a chest mount for it.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  5. #5
    North Van/Whistler
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    I've tried - believe me I tried. The form factor makes it impossible. I tried with webbing off the side of the chest; webbing off the shoulder. Do a search in the forum/
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  6. #6
    2006 Yeti AS-X
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    I admit I am not familiar with this video device but was just trying to help. I have a regular P&S camera that I made a cheapo chest mount for last year and just got a GoPro HD last week. I used the tripod mount on the P&S along with a Ziploc plastic bowl to make the chest mount with.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  7. #7
    North Van/Whistler
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    It will not work. I've tried that too. Like I said and will repeat again - The form factor makes it impossible. Unless you want it projecting about a foot away from your chest
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  8. #8
    2006 Yeti AS-X
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    Vholdr ContourHD Dimensions are 2.1" x 1.3" x 3.75" (53mm 34mm x 95mm)



    GoPro HD Dimensions are 1.6” x 2.4” x 1.2” (42mm x 60mm x 30mm)



    Sony Cybershot DSC-W290 (My P&S camera) Dimensions are 3 7/8" x 2 3/8" x 29/32" (97.6mm x 57.4mm x 22.6mm )



    The only reason I inclued my P&S camera is because I successfully made a chest mount for it and used the tripod mount to secure the camera.

    From the appearance, it more looks like it isn't really a size issue since the camera is only a couple inches longer than the other two cameras and they comfortably can be used on a chest mount either prefab or self made.

    On Vholdr's website, there is a tripod adapter made for this camera so from what it looks like that you could theoretically build a chest mount for this. As I stated, it is a few inches longer than the other cameras so it might not look as sexy but if you really wanted to make a chest mount for this, I am sure there is a way to do it. You have a tripod mount which in essence, is all you really need to secure the camera to whatever contraption you make.

    That is just my opinion. Others may vary.

    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  9. #9
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    The reason it's tough with the VholdR is it's shape - it barrel-shaped: longer than wide, making it hard to control it's aim when mounting in front of a surface such as your chest. If you can manage to mount it in something that's more GoPro-shaped, it will be easier to make stable, but then you're making the camera significantly larger and might as well just switch to a higher quality hand-held camera with built-in image stabilization.

    This is one of the major differences between the VholdR and GoPro - the VholdR is much better for mounting on the side of things, while the GoPro is much better at mounting in front or behind things.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  10. #10
    2006 Yeti AS-X
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalphile
    The reason it's tough with the VholdR is it's shape - it barrel-shaped: longer than wide, making it hard to control it's aim when mounting in front of a surface such as your chest. If you can manage to mount it in something that's more GoPro-shaped, it will be easier to make stable, but then you're making the camera significantly larger and might as well just switch to a higher quality hand-held camera with built-in image stabilization.

    This is one of the major differences between the VholdR and GoPro - the VholdR is much better for mounting on the side of things, while the GoPro is much better at mounting in front or behind things.

    -Pete
    I think you do have a great point Pedal. That would be the only thing that would make it difficult to do with this particular unit. You would need some kind of enclosure to keep it from wiggling all over the place I would think.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  11. #11
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    Also, the Vholdr captures up to 135 degrees of POV compared to 170 degrees with the GoPro HD. That would have to be a consideration as well. My Sony P&S camera only has a field of view of around 100 degrees.

    When I did the chest mount video last December with the Sony, it was ok but you could see only a little bit above and below the handlebars which seemed to be where the central focus of the camera was at. Mind you it was a ziploc bowl mount so not a precise mount by far.

    You would have to be really good at making the enclosure to both aim the camera properly and also keeping the camera stable. The actual enclosure may be the kicker on this one.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  12. #12
    North Van/Whistler
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    Like I said, now repeated twice. I've tried it. The form factor makes it impossible.

    I know about the tripod mount for the Vholdr and have one.

    I've also made the chest mount for a point and shoot and have posted directions about how to make one on this very site.

    Please feel free to attempt to make one
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  13. #13
    I am Doctor Remulak
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalphile
    The fork mount is my favorite - it allows you to see what the bike is rolling over as well as the terrain ahead, and is one of the steadiest places to mount a camera (because of it's proximity to the shock itself - the more material and distance you have between the shockk and the camera, the more opportunity for vibration to be amplified).

    I use the goggle mount along with a homemade Velcro strap to mount in these locations.

    Pete
    Do you have any pics of your mount for the fork?

  14. #14
    Tool
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Mikey
    Do you have any pics of your mount for the fork?





    The smaller velcro strip I use on top of the goggle mount setup takes care of any play between the camera and mount, and gets it all as snug to the fork as possible. If I use just the one wide strap with the goggle mount I can't keep it steady at all.

    -Pete
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  15. #15
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    I think I might have a solution for this. I have a go-pro, but one of my friends has a contour and wanted to use some of the mounts that I have for my camera. I made this adapter so the contour can be mounted to any go-pro mount. I dont have the chest mount to try it, but with adapter and a couple of links, I think it would work fine.

    couple of pics.





    I have been using my ski helmet lately since the mountain biking in NJ is a bit slow at the moment, but for example...



    Im planning on picking up a go-pro chest mount and try it out with the contour as well.

  16. #16
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    how'd you make that adapter? did you start with a go-pro mount and shave it up? or did you fab it???

  17. #17
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    I think the closest anyone's going to get is some kind of armpit mount.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider
    how'd you make that adapter? did you start with a go-pro mount and shave it up? or did you fab it???
    I made it using a 3d printer. (fused deposit model) I made a time lapse video of it with my gopro. http://www.vimeo.com/19708922

    Didnt come out great, I should have put the camera inside the machine in hindsight, but I was worried about the printer head hitting it.

    Anyway, I plan on picking up a chest mount, ill give it a try and see how it works with the contour.

  19. #19
    Yes, that's fonetic
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    You're going to have a problem with stability attaching to a chesty. Looks like it'll take a few arms connected to get it out far enough and it'll want to wobble. There's a few threads about keeping the camera stable with a chesty, so it's a problem with even the smaller GoPro with no extra connecting arms. I definitely have to wear my hydration pack chest strap over mine to keep it steady.

  20. #20
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    wow, that's pretty crazy. I've never heard of a 3d printer until now. that would be sweet if it was available at the consumer level. Thanks for sharing the video.

    edit: in that video, the printer was adding a bunch of white pieces, did you have to cut those off or do they just pull right off. Is there much cost in making that piece? obviously the cost of the machine is pretty high, but what about after that? i'm still amazed that a machine can do that. I obviously don't work in fabrication if that's a common thing.
    Last edited by jojotherider; 02-10-2011 at 11:27 AM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider
    wow, that's pretty crazy. I've never heard of a 3d printer until now. that would be sweet if it was available at the consumer level. Thanks for sharing the video.
    They start at about $20,000 or so. Which is not consumer level of course, but for a small company its not too crazy. For my company it has paid for itself as many of our customers find it really usefuly to be able to have a working prototype made within 24hrs. There are also many companies that offer 3d printing services if you send them a 3d solid model.

    Its really cool technology, basicly it uses what looks like weed wacker line (abs) and melts it. Then builds the part in .010 thick layers.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojotherider
    edit: in that video, the printer was adding a bunch of white pieces, did you have to cut those off or do they just pull right off. Is there much cost in making that piece? obviously the cost of the machine is pretty high, but what about after that? i'm still amazed that a machine can do that. I obviously don't work in fabrication if that's a common thing.
    Thats called the "support" material. The machine uses that to hold up the rest of the model as its being layered. Most of the time it pops right off. In the case of this piece, the only part that took some picking at was the chunk that is in bewteen the groove. I was in a hurry since I was excited to try it and just used a small screwdriver (if it was for a client, i would never use this method) which put a few nicks in the plastic. But normally if you have a piece of support that cant be picked off, you place the part in an ultrasonic cleaner and the support material will dissolve.

    The cost in using this machine is based on running time, and cubic inches of material used. Probably about $35-40 for this part. Not cheap, but an alternative would be machining it out of alum. or delrin (plastic) which would probably cost a few hundred dollers for a one off prototype. Machining the center groove for the contour side wouldnt be easy.

    Rapid prototyping has been around for a long time, but only more recently has it been cheap enough for smaller companies to buy a machine. There are even machines that can print in metal and cement now. very cool stuff. When I first saw our machine at a show I nearly **** myself.

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