Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Camera mounts..

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    420

    Camera mounts..

    Was just wondering where everyone mounts their camera and how... I have just got into this video stuff and although I know about stills, video is a new game, so how do I get past the shake and vibrations generated by mounting my small camcorder directly onto the front of the bike... TIA.

  2. #2
    2006 Yeti AS-X
    Reputation: Lawson Raider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,724
    The traditional place to mount a camera would be on top of your helmet. Some others have done the chest mount (myself included) but in my case it doesn't seem to be my preference.

    I have a GoPro HD so I have a variance of mounting options I can play with to put my camera on myself or the bike. With a regular P&S camera, you'll have to craft your own mounts or modify the GoPro adapter mounts to fit your tripod mount. I believe there is a thread on here that goes into that in more detail.

    Each mounting option has pros and cons. You'll have to play around and watch some bike videos to kind of get an idea of what views you like and what you don't like. That will help you determine what mounts to make.

    I like mounting on the side of the helmet but the down side is not everyone wants to see my ugly old mug in the video but the pro side is that for the most part the video is smooth. Mounting on the top of the helmet typically you don't see much of the rider or the bike and obviously you have to be concerned with low hanging branches.

    I would veer away from mounting on the handlebars as the videos from there tend to be very shaky - unless you have a way of stablizing the image. If you have a decent rear suspension, you can also mount the camera behind the seatpost for rear shots and get pretty decent video as well.

    I have seen tons of videos and folks out there have made some really cool vantage points. I would love to do one where you see the front wheel and the suspension in action while riding.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  3. #3
    commie
    Reputation: sputnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    245
    Quote Originally Posted by Lawson Raider
    The traditional place to mount a camera would be on top of your helmet.
    Really? Why would that be the "traditional" place to mount a small camcorder?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: salpic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    117
    I'm going to duct-tape my Flip camera to my chest...that should work.

  5. #5
    Tool
    Reputation: Pedalphile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,978
    Quote Originally Posted by Lawson Raider
    I have seen tons of videos and folks out there have made some really cool vantage points. I would love to do one where you see the front wheel and the suspension in action while riding.
    This is easy to do...if you're running a Lefty



    With a traditional fork, the best bet for this angle may be to mount on the downtube.
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,899
    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik
    Really? Why would that be the "traditional" place to mount a small camcorder?
    Because on the helmet it is pointing where you are looking. Chest mounts very nearly do it too.

  7. #7
    North Van/Whistler
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,589
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Because on the helmet it is pointing where you are looking. Chest mounts very nearly do it too.
    Actually lots of old timers mounted the camcorder or POV on the side of the helmet too.

    I like the GoPro chest mount. IMO the helmet mounts isolate the rider from the footage - the chest mount keeps one more involved - again IMO.

    The GoPro mounts are superb but not so good for mounting on frame as the mounts are optimized for a certain tubing size and bike tubing is too eclectic. The ContourHDs mounts are better for frame mount either with PedalPhile's webbing suggestion or my suggestion of using the Vio double hook and loop mount which allows frame mounts on a variety of tubing diameters..
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  8. #8
    commie
    Reputation: sputnik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    245
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Because on the helmet it is pointing where you are looking.
    ??? That does not answer the question about why he thinks that mounting a small camcorder on top of the helmet is the "traditional" mounting place.

    Mounting a small camcorder on the side of the helmet also results in the camera pointing where you are looking, in addition to being a more stable (video-wise) mounting location.

    Signed,

    Old Timer (Thanks for that one Lee)

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: salpic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    117
    I wouldn't want a camera on my head. I look around too much! My chest, on the other hand, is facing forward all the time.

    Of course there's the problem with leaning forward and such...

    Cable-cam, anyone?

  10. #10
    2006 Yeti AS-X
    Reputation: Lawson Raider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,724
    Quote Originally Posted by salpic
    I wouldn't want a camera on my head. I look around too much! My chest, on the other hand, is facing forward all the time.

    Of course there's the problem with leaning forward and such...

    Cable-cam, anyone?
    It comes down to preference where to put the camera. I have used my chesty mount a few times with my GoPro and find I have a hard time keeping it looking forward - see too much bike and too little trail. I tend to lean forward when riding that is how my bike fits and such.

    Some folks the chesty mount works great as they either are in a more sitted up position or did something to raise the angle of the camera. I still have to play around with mine so don't take my words as gospel.

    I built a cable cam and have used it once.. The one thing I learned quickly about cable cams is it takes a good chunk of time setting it up, getting the shot right, and then taking it down. Not good for a quick ride. If you have all the time in the world, then it is an option. Cable cams work best with two or more riders as the extra rider can start the unit going at the right time. You can do it solo but you have to actuate the unit and ride at the same time. Of course, there are folks out there that build remote actuators but for those who keep it simple, you have to have a string or something to start the unit.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    59
    This is the helmet mount I made. Works pretty good.



    Orbea Oiz
    Sette Flite
    Bianchi 26er ss

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: proxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    236
    Quote Originally Posted by EFMax
    Was just wondering where everyone mounts their camera and how... I have just got into this video stuff and although I know about stills, video is a new game, so how do I get past the shake and vibrations generated by mounting my small camcorder directly onto the front of the bike... TIA.
    Spend some time over at Mountain Bike Bills http://www.mountainbikebill.com/VideoHowToGuide.htm
    he has footage from numerous mount locations (older footage). However, your noggin probably provides the least amount of shake and vibration if you have a tight fitting helmet (FF even better).

    Im slowly finishing a new carbon fiber/fiberglass helmet mount for my HV10 cam, but I don't ride with it often. Uber HD quality, but a PITA! If your using a full size cam, check out MTBBill's "RockingInSoCal" Filmed with an HV10 helmet side-mount, or Wherewolf's videos done with a helmet top-mount http://arnica.csustan.edu/mtbike/ to get an idea of how those mounts work. If have one of those tiny SD card cams, just mod the GoPro mounts to accept your cam

    PrOxY

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    420
    I appreciate all of the input... as a temp measure and for an experiment, I have hooked up my camcorder in this mode, just to see how it behaves..



    I have isolated the both ends with some sort of rubber/hard sponge thingy and I have been able to set the angle right as this camcoder comes with the lens tilted at 25*..



    I am guessing that there are gonna be pros and cons to all fitments to the bike but I do wish there was some sort of solid isolation method that would allow for a permanent fix... I see also that fitting to the body would absorb a lot of shock but that is probably better suited to a bullet camera... will have to see how it goes..!

    Well after this morning's ride... it did not go too well.. I think trying to isolate it is not working so I shall try a more solid setup.. by the way this is on FS bike with 5in of travel back and front.. setup is hardtail like for my road riding.
    Last edited by EFMax; 07-03-2010 at 06:54 AM.

  14. #14
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,899
    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik
    ??? That does not answer the question about why he thinks that mounting a small camcorder on top of the helmet is the "traditional" mounting place.

    Mounting a small camcorder on the side of the helmet also results in the camera pointing where you are looking,
    OK, I guess I meant mounting the camera on the helmet in general, as opposed to mounting it on frame, fork, or bar.

    Mostly, mounting the camera on the rider seems to give the results that people want, unless they want some "unusual" camera angles like the suspension working for example.

  15. #15
    2006 Yeti AS-X
    Reputation: Lawson Raider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,724
    Nice looking camcorder. My first camera mount I made was a handlebar mount..it was a crude setup but it did work. Your handlebar mount is more well planned and constructed than even what I could have thought of.

    My handlebar mount had issues with excessive shakiness so I have shyed away from using it. I am sure there is a way to make one that does a better job at stablization.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  16. #16
    PROEDGEBIKER.COM
    Reputation: ProEdgeBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,290
    POst up a Vid!

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    420
    Quote Originally Posted by ProEdgeBiker
    POst up a Vid!
    Still getting the hang of the best formats to upload to youtube but... Here is a quick 60sec clip (set at 480p)..

    The initial wobble is me getting me shoes clipped in and then avoiding some dog muck on the platform.. But I think I may have identified the problem.. At the moment, the camera is attached via the single tripod screw, but this plate is at one end of the camera thus leaving the other end to bob about. I think that if I change the attachment so that the whole length of the camcorder is in contact (from a support point of view) that this will make a difference.. will try it tomorrow and see..

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    420
    Ok, as I suspected, the camcorder needed more support, so I revised the bracket and mounting point to this..

    and


    massive difference in the recording, now we are in business..

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: proxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    236
    This looks very similar to your mount. And it does seem to have the same contact points as your revised unit, in case someone else is looking for a similar mount anyway

    http://www.delkin.com/products/acces...ke-mount.html#
    PrOxY

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    420
    Quote Originally Posted by proxy
    This looks very similar to your mount. And it does seem to have the same contact points as your revised unit, in case someone else is looking for a similar mount anyway

    http://www.delkin.com/products/acces...ke-mount.html#
    That looks really neat.

    What I have found though, is that camcorders like mine need more support than just the tripod mount.. for stills it works very well, but for off road stuff the extended weight behind the mount causes the unit to bob..

    ... and of course there is the fact that mine does not look as neat, but at $65 mine cost about $2..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •