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Thread: XC ski choices

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    XC ski choices

    I'm looking into some XC skis for my girlfriend. What do y'all recommend based on your partner's setups? She's 5'8" about 140lbs, an advanced skier, but not very fast or aggressive. Neither of us are experienced nordic skiers, and I'm just learning to tele this year. We'll be mostly off track, a lot of mtb trails, some forest roads. Not planning on using them for big mountain excursions, as she also has an AT setup. However, a lot of my favorite mtb trails have good climbing/descending.

    I'm thinking of something like the Madshus Eon or similar. Not sure what length though. Her AT skis are 165, but the Madshus chart recommends 175 for her weight. Don't know how well she'll turn on longer skis. Really unsure of the binding/boot system for her. Is the stability of 3 pin and light tele worth the weight for her, or would a Magnum BC binding be better? How well do the Magnums turn? I'm using Voile 3 pin cables with Scarpa T4s on an older pair of Atomic Rainier skis. Might be overkill for her?

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    Based on what you say I would go for a little wider ski then your Rainiers or the Eon's--maybe the Alpina Lite Terrain (102/64/87)--or something in the same range. And pair it with a good 3 pin boot that is made for touring--such as Alpina 1675 BC 75mm boot, or Garmont or Scarpa--but with plenty of flexibility. And the Voile 3-pins with detachable cables are simple and proven, and light if you do not use the cables except for a serious downhill. The Alpina LT suggests a 168cm for a weight of 160-180, and a 158 for 130-150. She is 140 but then add clothing, boots, pack, etc. and she is maybe 150-155. I would go for the shorter 158 in this case. Same reasoning would hold for other brands--go a little shorter for maneuverability and ease of turning. So you get warm boots, a good simple binding, and a ski that is very versatile and easy turning. Don't forget half or full climbing skins--a waxless BC ski will only climb to a certain level of steepness, then it is handy to slap on some skins for a steeper climb; saves a lot of energy; yes you can use skins on waxless!

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    go with something narrower, straighter, and lighter for forest service roads and mtb trails. if yer not going mostly all up for turns on the down, go with something like the fischer outback 68 with NNNBC manual, not the magnum version, and the alpine BC 1550 boot or something similar. you give up quite a bit when you are doing the up/down kick/glide thing with the wider shaped skis, 3 pin, and bigger boots.

    rog

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    If your MTB trails are all twisty turny and narrow I would err on the short side to help turning, herringboning and sidestepping (you know what I mean) without getting hung up on the trees.

    I'm more of a back-40 duffer than a backcountry expert, but I've been happy with the BC NNN's for years. My skis are old Fischer E99'2 in 180, and I'm a 5'4" 135 female. 175 doesn't sound too long to me for someone 4" taller.

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    I'm on epochs with scarpa t4s. Voile 3pin and cable. Tried the garmont excursions and they just didn't fit well for me. This is moving from a karhu Pavo and synthetic leather boot with 3 pin.

    FWIW I had the NNN BC on the Karhus. Hated them after a couple of seasons. Moved to the 3 pins on those.

    I'm not an experienced BC skier - just got into tele before my little kn was born and came from snowboarding and a bit of Nordic.

    Planning on using the epochs and scarpas to try Bolton-Trapps by late winter. Otherwise I'll be chasing the kids around Smuggs on them. All easy terrain for me, for now. Unless I feel confident turning these skis at the resort. Or rent bigger gear.

    I try to get out to Little River and Cotton Brook a couple of times each winter. And will be checking out the trails near Camels Hump this year. Would love to get down to the Middlebury area and explore natural turnpike and trails off there.

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    What I wish I had $$ for is a pair of the Altai Hok with universal binding. 'Fast shoes' approach to single track skiing. Could strap them to the Pugsley and pack down break trail on my local woods routes. And use them for exploring. Super short. Built in skin. Super slow, compared to a true ski. But super short for turning and tight terrain.

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    Thanks for all of the responses to think about! I've been thinking NNN for her, so it's good to see a few comments on that side. She's probably not going to use them for sustained downhill, so she'd appreciate the NNN weight savings. Might go slightly wider than the Eons for her, but probably not more than the Epochs. My Rainiers seem like they should handle most conditions and they're between both of those skis. Hoping we'll have some decent coverage in the Upper Valley soon!

    Mike, we had a great time on Bolton-Trapps last season after a big storm -- highly recommended! Your Epochs will probably treat your legs better than our heavier AT gear did.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dire wolf View Post
    Thanks for all of the responses to think about! I've been thinking NNN for her, so it's good to see a few comments on that side. She's probably not going to use them for sustained downhill, so she'd appreciate the NNN weight savings. Might go slightly wider than the Eons for her, but probably not more than the Epochs. My Rainiers seem like they should handle most conditions and they're between both of those skis. Hoping we'll have some decent coverage in the Upper Valley soon!

    Mike, we had a great time on Bolton-Trapps last season after a big storm -- highly recommended! Your Epochs will probably treat your legs better than our heavier AT gear did.
    a friend of mine has the karhu guides (madscuss annum?) - he likes them for playing in the woods, and even at the resort with the family - but doesn't like them as much for touring / exploring.

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    Thumbs up to Karhu skis!! I have been on them for 30 years. Learned in Colorado on XCD's, now my "go to" is 10 year old Karhu Dorado, waxless, edges, about 97 at the tip, I think- turns on a dime, has some kick for the tour part, is lightweight, Voile 3-pin cables and almost never need the cables so the rig is pretty light. Karhu always had the best waxless grip pattern. I do not know if Karhu even exists any more or has been absorbed by ?. If the girlfriend is already doing tours with AT gear then she should go to the 3-pins and a touring Skarpa or Garmont or Alpina boot. Still do Alpine turns while learning Telemark.

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    I'll throw in another +1 for a Madshus and 3-pin setup. I like the simplicity and the reliability of the 3-pin stuff. I've got the Annums for use with older scarpas 2-buckles (basically a t4) and I just picked up some Eons for the touring side of things. 1 1/2 camber, good sidecut, wide-ish, I'm thinking it will be a great backcountry ski to play around on hike/bike trails with. If I didn't have the Annums for the more turn-oriented outings, I would probably be tempted by the Epochs as a inbetweener.

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    Another thumbs up for Karhu Guides, or now known as the Machus Epoch.

    In Vermont this is my go to ski. XC in the local park and lapping the sledding hill. Bolton backcountry. Family tour through little river. A few days on the Maine Huts and Trails.

    Sorta like a "trail bike," not the best for anyone location, but can do it all while sacrificing only a small amount.

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    guide=annum. 10th mtn=epoch. both turn well and tour meh unless yer climbing just to come back down.

    rog

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    Karhu actually just got back into nordic skis after being gone for awhile. I think all of the suggestions here are good ones, but I think you should also speak with a knowledgeable shop. There's one in the town that I live in, that is wonderful! Great selection of ski's, and even more importantly people that care... people who are concerned about what you need and hope that you become a lifelong skier... just like they are. The name of the shop is Akers Ski... you can either look at their website or give them a call 207-392-4582. Good luck!!

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    XC ski choices

    Quote Originally Posted by jjabkrvt View Post
    Sorta like a "trail bike," not the best for anyone location, but can do it all while sacrificing only a small amount.
    My "heavy" setup is Guides, Voile Switchbacks, and Scarpa T2x boots. It works well for shuffle and glide. I can make heel turns where I need to on tight singletrack, which is nice. Good for yurt trips, meadow skipping, skiing my MTB trails, and hitting lines off the trails when we have the snow for it. What I really want is a more modern waxless ski: the Voile Vector BC, for example.

    This kind of setup offers a lot more control for a beater like me, compared to my touring setup: Rainers, 3-pins and Fischer BCX875 boots.
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    or come in to EMS Portsmouth. I've been selling Nordic/tele/AT for 20 years, 9 years with EMS.

    i'll set ya up right

    rog

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    got some time chasing the kids on the epochs with scarpa t4s yesterday at smuggs on the learning hill. what a difference with the boots. and of course i now have a shaped ski under foot, compared to my 10 year old karhu pavo's.

    big fan of the epochs thus far. will have to look into a footbed for the t4s. outside of my feet felt like they were collapsing - so some minor pain. can't wait to get this setup to little river / cotton brook.

    and, btw, OGE has last years madschuss on clearance. epochs and annums are going for something like 269 a pair, compared to the new models at ~309.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmike View Post
    btw, OGE has last years madschuss on clearance. epochs and annums are going for something like 269 a pair, compared to the new models at ~309.
    OGE = Outdoor Gear Exchange

    Clearance Camping Gear | Telemark Skis | Rock Climbing Harness

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    Question; Is there better waxless base between brand or do they have almost the same amount of grip?

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    XC ski choices

    There's some variability. How much it varies between brands, I'm not certain, but it can definitely vary from ski to ski. My Rainiers have better climbing grip than my Guides, for example.
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    Waxless- I worked at the Nordic Center in Waterville Valley for 8 years until last Winter. Grip depends a lot on the snow surface ( packed,icy, powder, set track, etc.), also the temperature and water content of the snow can effect the grip-- on packed or groomed surfaces waxless skis really shine on warmer snow with higher water content, such as during thaws or in the Spring. Powder snow that has not been packed or groomed will stick to the waxless pattern if the temps warm above around 30 degrees, and if this is happening you might as well go home unless you use a liquid glide wax such as Swix F4, and even then it might be better to go home. Grip also depends on the skill level of the skier; a skilled skier can coax a little bit more grip out of a ski then a less skilled skier. In the Backcountry or off of a packed trail the grip diminishes rapidly the steeper the trail gets; so if you plan on doing extended climbs I suggest some sort of climbing skins-- either full length or kicker only (meaning the skins are only as long as the waxless pattern under the foot)..... Having said all that the best grip I have ever had from a ski has been from Karhu's ( see above threads saying that Karhu's are now Maddshus--probably with the same pattern). Next would be Atomics over Solomans and Fischers. I have no experience with Alpina. I'm sure Newmarket Rog and others will chime in. I always throw some skins in my pack if I know there are longish hills. It saves a ton of energy to slap on the skins for a good climb instead of herringboning or sidestepping yourself to death. Hope this helps Jozz .

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    Quote Originally Posted by damnation View Post
    Hope this helps Jozz .
    You kinda resumed in one post what I've read all morning! Thanks a lot. I think technique might have something to do with it since I was on skis yesterday for the first time in 25 years. I'm on Rossignol BC90, Voile 3 pins and Alpina boots.

    Just need to practice more, and maybe get some kicker skins for longer climbs.

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    In cold snow conditions, the waxless pattern on the Rossignol BC90s and BC125s is useless, and it creates significant drag on the downhill. Everything else about those skis is great tho, as long as you have some strong boots to drive them.

    For touring rolling, wiggly singletrack, I'd say any fat waxless ski is overkill, but 3-pin bindings do have their advantages over NNN-BC, unless you are a wizard at making really quick step-turns.
    "Gone are the days we stopped to decide where we should go. We just ride." - Robert Hunter

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    the newer fischer s-bound series has the best grip/glide of any of the brands. sintered bases as well. their new waxless pattern is a lot better than the mads/karhu/rossi skis.

    rog

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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    the newer fischer s-bound series has the best grip/glide of any of the brands. sintered bases as well. their new waxless pattern is a lot better than the mads/karhu/rossi skis.

    rog

    The old ones were miserable. Glad to hear they corrected that. A friend took 40 grit sandpaper to his and cut up his bottoms for more grip as I often skied away from him as he tried to herringbone.

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    ya, the old ones had "decorative" scales

    rog

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    I've been a downhill skier for years and went in to EMS last spring and told them I wanted something I could play with around local apple orchards (which are occasionally groomed with a skimobile) as well as MTB trails that are frequented by snow shoers and other skiers. They hooked me up with a set of Rossignol EVO Tour skis. I've been on them 4 times thus far and not really convinced they are what I was looking for. Not bad for a walking pace across flat open spaces in deep snow, but very poor grip trying to climb short hills on rolling MTB trails. I'll keep them for my jaunts around the apple orchards but I'll look into some of the suggestions above for my treks on MTB trails.

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    I sell the evo tour as pretty much strictly an in track for light out the door golf course type ski. the outback 68 from fischer would be great for your purpose.

    rog

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    Thanks rog! I'll keep these around for the orchards (at least the sales person was right about that part). I'll look into the Fischer Outback 68 for my next purchase. Should I look into different bindings and shoes as well? I have NIS bindings and Alpina T20 Plus boots.

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    Not really the gear geek that some of the above are so I can not comment onmany of the current waxless boards but, I a a tele skiier that came from alpining at the resort ad now only back country. My first "BC" waxlss ski was the rossi bc 70. It is almost no shape, metal edged, full camber. These are ok for kicking aound, but very difficult to turn. Then the Alpina Cross terrain came out, full edge, shape, camber. I found these to be very functional, but not once the snow gets more then 6 inches deep, or variable at all. Still use them, theyare agreat firm snow/corn ski. Climb as good as, and slide faster then the Rossi BC 125s. Then last year I picked up some Marquette BC skis. Game changed. By far the most fun waxless ski I've ever tried. They climb good (relative), slide fast, float over everything which is great for thin cover backyard bc, and most importantly are EASY to turn. Not great for telemark turns but they rip alpine turns. If you are looking for a fun turny ski that your alpine skiing girl will find stable and easy to turn on, you should realy consider these. On any of the more traditional waxless skis mentioned above, if you are not a compotent tele skier, you are going to have a real hard time making turns on light gear. On the marquettes, as a compotent alpine skier you will be right at home. They look funny, but solutely rip. 3 pin all the way for te same reason. If you're not worried about efficient kick and glide type touring and want to cruise around and really have a fun time on the DHs, Marquettes for the win IMO. https://marquette-backcountry.com/videos/

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveVt View Post
    ..... Marquette BC skis. Game changed. By far the most fun waxless ski I've ever tried. They climb good (relative), slide fast, float over everything which is great for thin cover backyard bc, and most importantly are EASY to turn.
    These sound ideal for a lot of my use, backyard glade type stuff. Anyone familiar with other options similar to the Marquettes as comparison? I've heard about magnetic skin strips on some BC skis, anything like that available on a Marquette style ski? T2s and a 3-pin binding sound like a great combo with these. Thanks Dave

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    yes chuyler. rotti NNN-BC manual bindings. not the magnums. and the alpina bc 1550 NNN boot would round out the package perfectly

    rog

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    After trying many waxless skis through the years (many of those mentioned above) all have paled in comparison to a dialed waxable ski - in climbing, kicking, and gliding. It is a bummer that it is so hard to go wide in a waxable.

    Been through a lot of boots and by far the best set up I've used are leather 75mm 3 pin Crispi Antarctic boots with a Voile binding. Those boots fit like a glove and completely blow most other xc boots off the field in both comfort and performance.

    I'm not just old school either as I've spent a lot of time on the newer stuff.

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    Lots of great suggestions here... I would still suggest a call to Akers Ski, been in business for 55 years, and only sell ski's year round. They offer lots of closeout options, good pricing, hot box option and all grew up in the ski business... can't beat their experience!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    Lots of great suggestions here... I would still suggest a call to Akers Ski, been in business for 55 years, and only sell ski's year round. They offer lots of closeout options, good pricing, hot box option and all grew up in the ski business... can't beat their experience!!
    Agree.

    I've dealt with these guys and thy are good.

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    PS....marquettes full retail at 190 bucks....have inserts and hardware included to mount at home. I've seen 'em for 10 new on some interwebs stites.

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    This thread is back from the dead... I took a close look at a bunch of these little short fat skis for the backyard glade (good article on a few here).

    The Marquettes were in the running but the lack of metal edges and the weight turned me off. I also looked closely at the Hoks but had reservations about the fixed skin patch. While I'm sure they climb well, the glide has to suffer and I worried about them icing up.

    I settled on a pair of Rossignol Boreal 130 made for LL Bean; winter clearance sale had them at $125. They call them sliding snowshoes but that's a gross misnomer. They have a waxless base, metal edges and come with a cheezy plastic binding that you can use any boot in. I tried the cheezy binding for a fairly long low angle tour/bushwhack and they were OK, but it was impossible to edge with them in steeper stuff. Tele turns were ok in low angle light powder on a firm base. I yanked those bindings off and installed a set of G3 cable tele bindings - wow, these things rip. They glide very well, hold an edge on steep crust covered with 4-6" of light powder and tele-turn like a dream. Climbing was no problem for moderate grades. Pretty stoked on these funny little skis. YMMV

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    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    The Marquettes were in the running but the lack of metal edges and the weight turned me off. I also looked closely at the Hoks but had reservations about the fixed skin patch. While I'm sure they climb well, the glide has to suffer and I worried about them icing up.

    I use the Hok's in 125 and freaking love them, but I am neither a skier nor a snowshoer so my expectations were very different.

    Glide does suffer, but even at 260lbs I cruise down rollers and they are super controllable. I am amazed at how well they climb, even on straight ice. Metal edges bite in nicely too. I was able to do my first paralell and tele turns on them without much trouble in 12-15" of mixed powder and sugary snow on a 3 mile back country tour last week.

    I know you went with some Rossignols which is sweet so I'm not trying to sell you on them but wanted to give my experience with them in case anyone else looks. The hoks are definitely not a serious tourer for people who want to move fast and cover a lot of ground, the are more for just playing around in the snow. One of my favorite things to do is to take them to the local park and ski down the tall snow banks or hill slopes.
    Eric

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    I've got a pair of Hoks and really enjoy them. They are really more of a snowshoe, that you can slide down hills with. They have worked out perfect for cruising around on snow covered single track. Traditional XC skis are overkill for most of the mtb trails around my area, and snowshoes are kinda boring- the Hoks fill that void perfectly.....

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    The Boreals and Hoks look fun. Two things I'll add on the Matquettes: made in Michigan, and being so fat, nearly straight, and heavy, they lay down a really nice fatbike track.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skyphix View Post
    I use the Hok's in 125 and freaking love them, but I am neither a skier nor a snowshoer so my expectations were very different....

    I know you went with some Rossignols which is sweet so I'm not trying to sell you on them but wanted to give my experience with them in case anyone else looks...
    No problem, different strokes for different needs. The Hoks look great and a close friend also loves his set-up. My backyard glade varies from double diamond steeps on the east face to low angle (relatively) open woods on the west side. I really wanted maximum glide for light snow events on the less steep side.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    The Boreals and Hoks look fun. Two things I'll add on the Marquettes: made in Michigan, and being so fat, nearly straight, and heavy, they lay down a really nice fatbike track.
    Hehehe. Yes, I find myself straddling the track to flatten out the middle ridge to be ready for the inevitable change in conditions.

    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by radair View Post
    No problem, different strokes for different needs. The Hoks look great and a close friend also loves his set-up. My backyard glade varies from double diamond steeps on the east face to low angle (relatively) open woods on the west side. I really wanted maximum glide for light snow events on the less steep side.
    That sounds like fun! Yeah, I've noticed on ungroomed low angle stuff there really isn't much glide with the Hoks without giving a kick or two, and what I remember about traditional XC skis was that they had some glide on pretty much any incline. I've had the Hoks out in as little as 2" of wet snow and they had decent amount of glide there, I've never experienced icing issues but my longest day was a little over 4 miles so not exactly an all-day outing. They definitely won't be as fast as a true BC ski. I'm thinking my next ski might be something more like the Altai Kom, a wide 162 with a fish scale base instead of the inset skin. The Hoks are perfect for my use (tight trails in the woods, hunting, playing around) but it might be nice to cover more ground and get a little more serious skiing.
    Eric

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    Quote Originally Posted by damnation View Post
    Powder snow that has not been packed or groomed will stick to the waxless pattern if the temps warm above around 30 degrees, and if this is happening you might as well go home unless you use a liquid glide wax such as Swix F4, and even then it might be better to go home.
    Does anyone disagree with this? We put a man on the moon (apparently) but we can't keep fresh snow from sticking to waxless skis?

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    I don't know about the science of it. But I can say for sure I've had these issues on my waxless.

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    To get off subject, kind of as it is still ski related, and Rog seems to a great source of information I am looking at getting my first alpine touring setup. What do you suggest for someone that will do 90% still on the lifts, but wants something that can still go do Kearsarge, Cardigan, Moose, etc. I am 5'4" and winter weight of 150lbs, my current alpine sets are Salomon Foils in 158 (seem a little short now that I am getting better) and Nordical Supercharger Enforcers in 169. I want to replace the foils Foils with something similar of 85 under foot. I am thinking Marker F10 bindings but need a ski that is still good on groomers and lift runs, but not to heavy for when I do go on a tout and can handle the ice and crud of New England backcountry. Hope that is enough information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by offrhodes42 View Post
    To get off subject, kind of as it is still ski related, and Rog seems to a great source of information I am looking at getting my first alpine touring setup. What do you suggest for someone that will do 90% still on the lifts, but wants something that can still go do Kearsarge, Cardigan, Moose, etc. I am 5'4" and winter weight of 150lbs, my current alpine sets are Salomon Foils in 158 (seem a little short now that I am getting better) and Nordical Supercharger Enforcers in 169. I want to replace the foils Foils with something similar of 85 under foot. I am thinking Marker F10 bindings but need a ski that is still good on groomers and lift runs, but not to heavy for when I do go on a tout and can handle the ice and crud of New England backcountry. Hope that is enough information.
    I have a few pairs of AT skis but I have to say the pair of super fat Black Diamond Amperage skis I bought this year are the most amazing ski I have ever been on. Float incredible in powder of any depth but still carve the groomers. A full pound heavier per ski than my K2 World Piste or Mt. Bakers but I don't care. I use Fritschi bindings; the Dynafit set-up would be lighter. Short skis are an advantage in tight trees & gullies. I am 5'-7" and have settled on 165s as ideal for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott O View Post
    Does anyone disagree with this? We put a man on the moon (apparently) but we can't keep fresh snow from sticking to waxless skis?
    We can, just use Swix F4. I'm not sure it's as bad as Damnation states but there's a reason Nordic centers sell tons of the F4.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog View Post
    the newer fischer s-bound series has the best grip/glide of any of the brands. sintered bases as well. their new waxless pattern is a lot better than the mads/karhu/rossi skis.

    rog
    They do climb much better, and they continue to be the best turning waxless pattern.

  47. #47
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    Did the Camel's Hump Challenge on my Marquettes yesterday. 25 km, 4500 vert gain in breakable crust conditions. They owned it. Saw every variation of gear from full rando, to bc 125s with dynaits, fat viole waxless with big tele boots right down to waxed skinnies. I was the only one looking to get out of the track and make turns. They ski so well in shallow-on-firm, maink, or crusty $hit f#ck snow. They do slide slow, but climb great, skins stayed in the pack all day. Lack of edges was not an issue with a plastic 2 buckle tele boot. Got some fantastic looks from the core kick-and-gluiders but after riding an imperial or 10 years as my xc bike, I'm used to that. Tele-Marquetting FT(fun)W. $.02

  48. #48
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    That sounds like fun. We're in Maine right now and the conditions are pretty much the same... Crusty, slushy, and fast, depending on if the snowshoes have gone through.

    Sounds like that event is a blast. What would you think of a fit beginner attempting that course? Fitness is there but skill on the downhill lacking.
    Eric

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveVt View Post
    Did the Camel's Hump Challenge on my Marquettes yesterday. 25 km, 4500 vert gain in breakable crust conditions. They owned it. Saw every variation of gear from full rando, to bc 125s with dynaits, fat viole waxless with big tele boots right down to waxed skinnies. I was the only one looking to get out of the track and make turns. They ski so well in shallow-on-firm, maink, or crusty $hit f#ck snow. They do slide slow, but climb great, skins stayed in the pack all day. Lack of edges was not an issue with a plastic 2 buckle tele boot. Got some fantastic looks from the core kick-and-gluiders but after riding an imperial or 10 years as my xc bike, I'm used to that. Tele-Marquetting FT(fun)W. $.02

    Thats on my list to do. Was thinking this year, but just not fit for it.
    Did turns all day long on my Epochs at Smuggs with the wife. Scarpa T4s and the Epochs. Lots of fun. I'm slowly grinding the pattern off the bottom though. And mine are 185s. Crazy long for playing at the lift served. 3pin cables.

    Those Marquettes look like a good ticket for lots of things. Also like the Hoks (in theory...).

    Pics from a couple of weeks ago at Smuggs. My brother (who skis mostly in the west) on the fat boards. Me on the skinny long things.


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr


    Untitled by mbeganyi, on Flickr

    Waiting for a good snow dump to try Bolton - Trapps.

  50. #50
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    The Challenge trail is well maked and burned in. Very beginner friendly mostly traversing with mellow ups and downs. We circumnavigated the Hump starting from the Huntington XC center in a clockwise direction. Moderate climb out of Preston Brook up to Bamforth Ridge. Slightly spicy but short desent out of the wind gap. Awesome tour. Once through the saddle between bald hill and the hump a nice long and mellow dh traverse brought us back to the nordic area. I think my partners max speed was 11mph on that section so it is quite mellow.

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