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  1. #1
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    Skiing MTB trails?

    Does anybody ski mtb trails? I alpine ski but I'm ignorant to other styles and set ups. I see telemark, out & back, backcountry, touring etc.

    I'd like something to cruise around the local singletrack when time is limited but I don't know what type of set up I would need. Any suggestions?

    I figured I could grab a lesson on telemark Thursdays at Bolton Valley.

    I apologize for asking this on a MB forum but figure you guys would understand the terrain and be able to offer some advice.
    Last edited by Fat & Hairy; 11-16-2009 at 06:06 PM.

  2. #2
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    Karhu Guides or 10th Mountains for turns, not so great for kick and glide. Both are waxless, 10ths are skinnier, a little better for flats, guides are fatter, way better for turns. 10ths would not be good for lift serv. Do not go very far into the woods without skins if there is any decent climbing as well. Outdoor Gear Exchange in Burlington has lots of knowledge and used gear as well. There are many options. If you want to lift serv tele and rolling back country then the Guides are great. Voile Switchback bindings ($$) rock. If your short on funds, spend the money on the boots. telemarktips.com is a good resource as well. People in VT can be asshats about their 'secret stashes' so don't even bother to ask. Bald off of Buroughs Camels Hump trail is a great beginner out a' bounds (follow the skin track). Also stuff around Bolton accessible from the nordic center and off of the backside. The nordic center can provide maps. Once you get started, you will be looking for the steeper terrain, particularly if the snow is deep.

  3. #3
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    I apologize for asking this on a MB forum but figure you guys would understand the terrain and be able to offer some advice
    i think in general you can x-c ski on mtb trails


    there's a winter tri's in new hamp. & mass. off road, mtb & x.c. ski
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  4. #4
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    I apologize for asking this on a MB forum but figure you guys would understand the terrain and be able to offer some advice
    i think in general you can x-c ski on mtb trails hiking trails too?


    there's a winter tri's in new hamp. & mass. off road, mtb & x.c. ski
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  5. #5
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    I don't know (modern) cross country skiing.

    But, I feel that singletrack is ideally suited to snowshoeing. The 'shoes provide versatility on the trails that are probably not tracked for skis, and also the tight turns and off cambers that you find on bike trails. Sure, it's slower but snowshoeing is easier than most beginners expect!

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  6. #6
    Ride and Smile suckas
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    There is a place in Merrimack NH that they groom all winter so you can XC ski, there are a few powder areas that people use back country skiis on and blast down a steep section.
    Its called Horse Hill and i usually go on my studded bike or snow shoes but there are a ton of XC people in there becasue of the grooming
    "DO OR DO NOT, THERE IS NO TRY" -Yoda
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  7. #7
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    most are multiuser

    Most of the trails in vermont are really and officially multi user trail networks and are a blast in the winter.

    The biggest question is what do you want to do?
    -If you want to go fast and rip more downhill MTB trails and lift stuff then telemark is the way to go.
    -If you want to keep fit and enjoy the woods and then do more backcountry (NNN bindings and more flexible boots and skinny skiis with patterned bases and metal edges).
    -If you are after fitness go for a purely cross country ski set up.


    I personally have a midheight tele boots (Garmont Veloces) and a set of skis for lift access and one set for more cross country stuff (narrower with metal edges and patterned base). [FYI: without the patterned base ("fish scales") moving forward on flat ground is damn near impossible.] It is overkill for Mobbs (my local spot) but it is a lot of fun.

    I would also second the snowshoes suggestion. Snowshoeing is an absolute blast and allows you to go anywhere in any winter condition (first tracks in deep powder is as euphoric as skiing).

  8. #8
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    Thanks everybody for the response. I guess where my confusion starts is the diversity of options. I'm not looking for lift assisted stuff. I'm thinking kind of like snowshoeing but with the ability to ski the down sections along with the ability to make tight turns. I'm guessing that is considered more back country or out & back.

  9. #9
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    Check out the Karhu XCD series ski... I have the Guide and really like them for breaking trail, or ripping turns down snowmobile trails.

  10. #10
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    fisher outbound crown

    for all of my bc tour and turn with alpina bc 1550 boot and nnn-bc manual binders. the skis are 70-60-65 and are a nice compromise. i ski fort rock a ton on them as well as trails like the wildcat valley trail that drops over 3000 vert in 8 miles, to closed ski areas for corn in spring. they parallel and tele well in good snow.

    i've used the karhu 10th mtn in the big hills of wv bc, like 1000+ vert ascent/descent with a garmont excursion and chili binding. the set up turns well and climbs well, but tours like crap compared to my narrower partial metal edged fishers.

    black mountain ski area april 07:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgQu-UqT3c8

    powderhouse hill ski area south berwick maine, same skinny setup:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1h6OiJ6EbI

    rog
    Last edited by newmarketrog; 11-17-2009 at 07:05 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woozle
    Karhu Guides or 10th Mountains for turns, not so great for kick and glide. Both are waxless, 10ths are skinnier, a little better for flats, guides are fatter, way better for turns. 10ths would not be good for lift serv. Do not go very far into the woods without skins if there is any decent climbing as well. Outdoor Gear Exchange in Burlington has lots of knowledge and used gear as well. There are many options. If you want to lift serv tele and rolling back country then the Guides are great. Voile Switchback bindings ($$) rock. If your short on funds, spend the money on the boots. telemarktips.com is a good resource as well. People in VT can be asshats about their 'secret stashes' so don't even bother to ask. Bald off of Buroughs Camels Hump trail is a great beginner out a' bounds (follow the skin track). Also stuff around Bolton accessible from the nordic center and off of the backside. The nordic center can provide maps. Once you get started, you will be looking for the steeper terrain, particularly if the snow is deep.
    I like this advice except for the "ass hat" generalization. I think skiers everywhere in the east can be ass hats about their stashes. I switched to tele a few years back after getting annoyed by all the ass hat lift riders. I got some light boots that are stiff enough for aggressive skiing and light enough to be fun on waxless (scaled) back country skiis. At the time the only real choices were the Fishers Out of Bounds line up or the Alpina cross terrains. Folks who did some ski tests mentioned that the fishers did'n climb well enough to make them that fun, particularly when try to climb and break trail, w/o skins. I have found the alpinas to be an awsome ski. You can totally rage DH, and they climb pretty good. I don't have skins for them and haven't felt like I've needed them to have fun. If I see some skinny skins for cheap I may grab them up. Since discovering the fun and accesibilty of these "bushwacher" type skis, more then half my ski days are on them. They make moderate terrain real fun, and when the snow is good you can get pretty aggressive on them. I have simple 3 pin viole bindings w/o cables and they are very functional. GL and enjoy. Great set up for exploring the New England Lost Ski Areas that dot the northeast....
    www.NELSAP.org

  12. #12
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    Roger,

    What would you recommend for my interests?
    I have currently some Silveretta bindings mounted to some OLD Rossignol Haute Route tele skis and I use my plastic or leather ice climbing boots. The skis are heavy and I use full length skins. I have used them for general touring around Mt. A to Huntington Ravine or Shell Pond ice climb approaches to Katahdin trips. I would like to continue using this boot / binding set up but with a lighter ski. Something that I can either run a full length skin or wax if needed, unless there is a nice waxless ski? But one that tours better and still allows me to lock it down and get a few turns in. This would obviously be necessary for a return trip from Huntington. Appreciate your thoughts, you can PM if interested to keep the thread clean.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat & Hairy
    Thanks everybody for the response. I guess where my confusion starts is the diversity of options. I'm not looking for lift assisted stuff. I'm thinking kind of like snowshoeing but with the ability to ski the down sections along with the ability to make tight turns. I'm guessing that is considered more back country or out & back.
    Scaled ski (waxless), full metal edge, plasic 2 buckle boots, 3 pin bindings.

  14. #14
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    Go for the Guides. My favorite for this area, as they are light and quick for xc skiing, but with the right conditions they are my favorite for backcountry skiing.

    They have some 3-pin bindings on them and I ski them with some Garmont Excursions.

    We are planning a trip to Baxter this winter, going to use the pugs with a large sled for the 13mile slug into the camp, hauling all of our gear while everyone else skins in. Looking forward to the combination of the two sports!

  15. #15
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    Scaled ski (waxless), full metal edge, plasic 2 buckle boots, 3 pin bindings.
    Old school?

    I used to have 3 whole bindings. I got a new set of x-c last year, I don't think there the 3-whole.

    it's a lo-tech system, the whole kit was like 80 bux, ski barn was getting ride of x-c.

    last winter started okay, but it just became icey mess after december
    Look to where the river ends, or where the river starts...

  16. #16
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    xcd

    Quote Originally Posted by Climber25
    Roger,

    What would you recommend for my interests?
    I have currently some Silveretta bindings mounted to some OLD Rossignol Haute Route tele skis and I use my plastic or leather ice climbing boots. The skis are heavy and I use full length skins. I have used them for general touring around Mt. A to Huntington Ravine or Shell Pond ice climb approaches to Katahdin trips. I would like to continue using this boot / binding set up but with a lighter ski. Something that I can either run a full length skin or wax if needed, unless there is a nice waxless ski? But one that tours better and still allows me to lock it down and get a few turns in. This would obviously be necessary for a return trip from Huntington. Appreciate your thoughts, you can PM if interested to keep the thread clean.
    i'd go 10th mtn or guide for your intended purposes.

    rog

  17. #17
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    When the snow gets too deep to ride there's a group of us that gets together for a TNS (thursday night ski)... headlamps, backcountry skiis, frosty beverages. We ski snowmobile trails and bushwack a little, after a dump we find some powder to ski, it's all good fun.

    I actually use my Scarpa T1's with my Karhu Guides. Yes, the boots are overkill, but I can use the exercise and they don't really slow me up that much. Its not a race, after all. but when it's time for a descent I let everyone else go first, then I rip down the trail passing everyone sitting in the bombholes they made when they crashed on the descent using their skinny track skis and floppy ankle-high boots!

  18. #18
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    Nice turns Rog! You should keep your heels free on the big skis too!

    I'm a big fan of the Karhu XCD GT with NNN BC and the beefiest Alpina boot you can find. Tele turns in the right snow are super fun on that setup. The Guide/10th are also fun for deeper/steeper snow. 3 pin with cables and the Excursion or T3 works well.

    However, most of the bike trails around here are a bit too tight for skiing. Snowshoeing is fine on singletrack, but I'd rather ski on old logging roads, snowmo trails, or just find a glade.

    Here's a fun shot from one of the few Fellowship bike trails that follows portions of an old logging road. Sheep Thrills in the HTF.

    Brooke
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Skiing MTB trails?-brooke-jump-sm.jpg  

    I used to build these: www.bikesonsnow.homestead.com
    I now build trails: www.sinuosity.net

  19. #19
    beer thief
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    Quote Originally Posted by newmarketrog
    black mountain ski area april 07:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgQu-UqT3c8

    powderhouse hill ski area south berwick maine, same skinny setup:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1h6OiJ6EbI

    rog
    Rog, if you are that core into the ski, why live on the east coast? Them hills are pint size.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by radair
    Rog, if you are that core into the ski, why live on the east coast? Them hills are pint size.
    LOL

  21. #21
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    damn i missed this!

    Quote Originally Posted by radair
    Rog, if you are that core into the ski, why live on the east coast? Them hills are pint size.


    rog

  22. #22
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    been there done that

    Quote Originally Posted by BikesOnSnow
    Nice turns Rog! You should keep your heels free on the big skis too!
    i used to tele on big gear just like i used to ride 29ers. here: the east sucks this how we tele in nh, where the real hills of the east are:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6korU8FgnM

    rog

  23. #23
    the train keeps rollin
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    Quote Originally Posted by radair
    Rog, if you are that core into the ski, why live on the east coast? Them hills are pint size.

    Yeah, and maybe he should learn how to parallel, tele turns is child's play
    beaver hunt

  24. #24
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    Jeez Rog , you can't catch a break can you! I love my 10th Mtn with a three pin set up, 25 year old Merrill XCD Lace for out the back door adventures!

  25. #25
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    you wann em nate?

    Quote Originally Posted by snowdrifter
    Yeah, and maybe he should learn how to parallel, tele turns is child's play
    how bout parallel on xc gear

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TkBmDPiaNu4

    or, on the bigger gear deep in my old back yard....the wasatch

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A89G7SLbRkE

    rog

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