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  1. #1
    One-Winged Angel
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    Mount Snow Crosstown Trails? 90 bucks.

    So I call Mount Snow yesterday to see what the deal is with their Crosstown Trails.

    First, I sent an email that was never answered. Then, I called their main number only to find that it was an answering machine with a message saying to call back in the Fall. So THEN I called the hotel, and they connected me with the bike shop.

    I asked if you had to pay for the Crosstown Trails. "You certainly do" was the answer.

    Oh well, looks like I'll be waiting until the fall to ride 'em again... cuz I'll be damned if I pay 90 bucks for a trail network that you can cover in an hour and a half.

  2. #2
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    Are those the trails about a mile or so from the mtn?

  3. #3
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    Dude, I was there two years ago. You will not see anybody out there. Go to the main store and get a map. Tell them that you are thinking about ridding them. Then, go ride them. The trails are empty. Nobody will bother you.

  4. #4
    One-Winged Angel
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    Yeah, the crosstown trails are the ones about a mile from the mountain. I can't believe they're actually trying to charge people for them.

    On the other hand, trespassing is dishonest. But I might say, "screw it" at some point this summer and ride 'em anyway.

    There are a million other places to ride here that are free. NO WAY am i spending 90 bucks to ride those trails.

  5. #5
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    Hard to believe they'd try and charge $90 for trails the locals walk free of charge with no way to collect at the trail.

  6. #6
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    Weird. They are totally openning themselves up to liability law suits by charging a fee for xc riding. Doesn't make much sense.

  7. #7
    Inbred Homebrewer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sephiroth
    I asked if you had to pay for the Crosstown Trails. "You certainly do" was the answer.

    Oh well, looks like I'll be waiting until the fall to ride 'em again... cuz I'll be damned if I pay 90 bucks for a trail network that you can cover in an hour and a half.
    Yeah, you have to pay, but where the hell did you pull $90 from??? The daily pass is only $10. Even the season pass is 'only' $80, and that gives you access to the Crosstown trails and the entire mountain (w/o lift service... great way to get those legs in shape!) all season long.

    FWIW, this is not a 'new' thing. Been this way for at least 7 years, although I think the daily pass was only $5 then.

    Re: 'opening themselves to liability' by charging money to ride? It's completely the opposite. To get the pass, you sign a waiver releasing the resort from all liability if you get hurt, just like you do when you go up on the lift. If you get hurt riding w/o the pass, you're tresspassing, so I think the resort has a leg to stand on defending itself against liability either way.
    [SIZE="2"][/SIZE]"mmmm....Beeeeeeer." - Homer J. Simpson

  8. #8
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    Um...."Landowner Liability Act". I suggest reading it. Waivers, as in the ones ski areas use in the form of lift tickets, do not protect anyone from anything. Proof is in the countess settlements AGAINST ski areas. The LAW in VT states very clearly that a landowner can not be held responsible for any person injury UNLESS the charge a fee for usage, get some sort of tax break on the land for allowing usage, or basically booby traps the trail and causes injury. By charging a fee for usage you are assuming responsibility for the safety and well being of the trail for users, despite any waiver, in fact, despite the law, you can still get sued, but by charging a fee, you are no longer protected under the landowner liability law. Not really trying to convince you, just stating what the law says. With so much exceptional and FREE riding in the state, it's a wonder to me why people would pay for it. As for the trails ON the Mtn that are lift served...different story.

  9. #9
    Inbred Homebrewer
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveVt
    Um...."Landowner Liability Act". . .With so much exceptional and FREE riding in the state, it's a wonder to me why people would pay for it. As for the trails ON the Mtn that are lift served...different story.
    I don't really need convincing. I know that those waivers generally aren't worth the paper they're printed on. I'm also not the sort to sue anybody over an injury, regardless of whose land I happened to have been on at the time...

    As for the 'different story' - I assume you mean paying to play "on the mountain" is a different story because you're paying for the convenience (and operation/maintenance) of the lift? Just an aside, but - if you pay to ride the lift and the trails on the mountain, you don't have to pay additional money for Crosstown access, so one might as well ride all that's there, too.
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  10. #10
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    True, my understanding was that if you wanted to ride the trails off the mtn., you still have to pay. That would open up some room for a liability lawsuit to stick.

    example: I show up to ride the cross country trails off the mtn., I am told to pay. I pay and go out on the trails. In a high speed section, on a blind corner, a newly fallen tree throws me off my bike and I am paralyzed. My insurer, now faced with astronomical Dr.'s bills, sues you for 20 million dollars. In court, the Landowner Liability Act will not be there to protect the persons who collected the fee because they assume responsibilty for the safety of the trails.
    Sounds like the trails off the mtn. near Mt. Snow are free so this would not apply, just wanted to put it out there. Cheers.

  11. #11
    horseman
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    crosstown

    The Crosstown trails are fairly entertaining. Volume of traffic though has reduced the taveling way to smooth dirt single track with roots and rocks thrown in. Often, difficulty is more a matter of speed and the amount of moisure affecting surface conditions (duh!). But it's not like the more natural options off-campus. Still, paying is really a matter of conscience (and whether or not you feel like you need a map). We usually use the trails when we are passing thru from one "off-mountain route" to another. While there is the Valley Trail, that is a free bike path affair that leadsd from the mountain over to the Mount Snow Golf course and crosses between some of the same routes we are connecting too, it is often more fun to divert thru a few of the Crosstown "Forest" trails instead. Usually there isn't time to run up to the "Mountain" to pay for the privelege of crossing over.

  12. #12
    One-Winged Angel
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    Sounds like the trails off the mtn. near Mt. Snow are free so this would not apply, just wanted to put it out there. Cheers.

    They're not free. They want 80 bucks to ride them (not 90 like I had posted before).

    I guess maybe it's worth it if you're going to ride the mountain, too, but I can't believe they want to charge for just the crosstown trails. There's all kinds of signs at the trailhead saying that you're tresspassing, they'll prosecute, etc.

  13. #13
    horseman
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    $90 ?

    I live here and didn't think the fellows at the shop charged that much. I went to the Mount Snow website, events, mountainbiking, and found they offered a $10 trail pass. It seems like $10 isn't a lot to pay for a map, info/advice on everything from where to ride to where to eat/drink, and perhaps something you might need while you're there. Mount Snow was just purchased and any interest in mountainbiking should go a long way towards convincing the new owners to stay involved in the sport/industry/business.
    Don't want to use the Crosstown trails, try some of the XC stuff on the mountain. Ever ridden the XC race course. No picnic! I believe that anyone who has raced at Mount Snow would say the course is tame. I think there's plenty to get for your initial $10, even if it's only used to figure out how the Mount Snow stuff fits into the local trailwork puzzle.

  14. #14
    Inbred Homebrewer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sephiroth
    They're not free. They want 80 bucks to ride them (not 90 like I had posted before).

    I guess maybe it's worth it if you're going to ride the mountain, too, but I can't believe they want to charge for just the crosstown trails. There's all kinds of signs at the trailhead saying that you're tresspassing, they'll prosecute, etc.
    I think you're missing the bigger picture. They aren't charging you *just* for the Crosstown trails. There is no 'crosstown pass'. What you're getting is a season trail pass for ALL of Mt. Snow (the DH trails, and the XC). Consider the fact that they charge something like $35/day for combined lift/trail pass, and that $80 isn't really so outrageous for ~ 3 months of riding. A little expensive? Sure, but then - so is everything else at Mt. Snow!!

    Would I pay it if I had no intention of ever climbing up the mountain and riding down? No way. If I lived close enough to Mt. Snow to ride there all summer long, I'd rather pay $35 for a KTA green season pass and suck up the drive time.

    ymmv
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildskycomet
    I live here and didn't think the fellows at the shop charged that much. I went to the Mount Snow website, events, mountainbiking, and found they offered a $10 trail pass. It seems like $10 isn't a lot to pay for a map, info/advice on everything from where to ride to where to eat/drink
    $10 gets you a *one day* pass. It's $80 for the whole biking season.
    [SIZE="2"][/SIZE]"mmmm....Beeeeeeer." - Homer J. Simpson

  16. #16
    horseman
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    season's pass?

    Why would anyone purchase a pass here unless perhaps they owned a home and planned on using the lift service on a regular basis. Wouldn't you travel to different places? Different local trails one weekend. KTA another weekend. Waterbury another. New York another. New Hampshire another. Unless you lived reasonably close by and used the Mountain as a facility for training downhill...

  17. #17
    Inbred Homebrewer
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildskycomet
    Why would anyone purchase a pass here unless perhaps they owned a home and planned on using the lift service on a regular basis. Wouldn't you travel to different places?
    Of course I would. I'm just quoting rates from their website. I only visit Mt. Snow once or twice a year, and - any more - that's as much for the sake of tradition and socializing w/ the folks I go with as it is for the quality of the riding.

    IIRC, the person who started the thread lives in NJ. I have no idea why anyone would make that trip *solely* to ride crosstown - even if access was completely free!! The trails are a lot like the rest of the 'resort' proper (read: NOT like the rest of VT) - nice place to visit, but it gets old fast and I wouldn't want to live there. No offense!
    [SIZE="2"][/SIZE]"mmmm....Beeeeeeer." - Homer J. Simpson

  18. #18
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    Are the cross town trail on Mt. Snow land?

  19. #19
    One-Winged Angel
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    Bah, I don't live in Jersey anymore. I'm in Wilmington. Just haven't updated the profile.

    Much nicer without the traffic, humidity, pollution and attitude.

  20. #20
    horseman
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    Crosstown @ MT Snow

    The Crosstown Road trails (magical forest names) are located on Mount Snow property. The Valley Trail that winds thru it is a public bike path (north/south) that intersects with the actual Crosstown trail (abandoned roadway [public] that leads east/west from the Mont Snow golf course to Handle Rd). The trails that Mount Snow calls their own to the south of Crosstown Trail may or may not be on other landowners' property. they use many of the older abandoned Hermitage cross country skiing trails. Some of the ones on the north side of Crosstown Trail are on Mount Snow property and some involve some of that same xc ski trail network. You'd be pretty hard pressed to know when you were on or off Mount Snow property.
    Again... the best riding in the area is "off-campus". Most folks don't even know where it is.

  21. #21
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    And I imagine the goods is free, as it should be IMHO.

  22. #22
    In the rear with the gear
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    I am headed up there this weekend of a week of R&D, Riding and Drinking!

    I believe there is a trail that connects Haystack and Mt Snow (maybe its a dirt road), is this rideable?
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  23. #23
    horseman
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    The trail between the peaks of Mount Snow and Haystack is incredibly primitive. I helped build the trail 15-20 years ago. It used to be maintained a little more regularly when Mount Snow still owned Haystack. Then they used to make sure they could get groomers and snowmobiles back and forth regularly. Haystack was sold off a couple of years back and probably the only maintenance activities have been carried out by snowmobile folks. In any event, what's there now most likely has not been ridden by mountainbike for years. It can be done and it would certainly be an adventure. Surprisingly though, there aren't many vistas from up there. The woods are incredibly tall on either side of the trail. What would be a good adventure ride would be to use abandoned cross country ski trails that lead up to the bottom of the Sunbrook area, make your way up to the top of Mount Snow, over to the Haystack Ski area peak, down Haystack and back. Make sure your brake pads have a lot of life in them!

  24. #24
    In the rear with the gear
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    Yeah, one of the days, I want to ride to the top of Mount Snow and then take some alternative way back down - thinking back to when I used snowboard there - isn't there some sort of access road/green trail on the north side of the mountain that winds its way down to the bottom?

    Your suggestion to use the XC ski trails sounds interesting.
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  25. #25
    horseman
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    a way off the "mountain"

    about 1/3 of the way up the "mountain", up the access road, the trail splits at Ego Alley and heads back over to the left and further up towards the top. If you keep right you are actually on part of what was Somerset Road that lead ot Somerset resevoir. Continue to the right, across the mountain and a really wide trail, Snowdance, and then One More Time, then a work road leading towards the bottom of the North Face (once you cross One More Time there is a mountain bike trail on the right that leads down and was part of the early cross country courses [Tomac/Overend vintage]). As you approach the bottom of the North Face and lifts, keep right acoss the bottom of the clearing where you will probably find a Mount Snow rope across the remnants of Somerset Road. It's a pretty rugged descent with many technical elements. Entertaining "keep you on your toes" kind of ride down to the picnic area near the Somerset dam. Usually when we do thaat ride we take the forest road to the right and head north roughly parallel to the resevoir. Just before it peters out there is a snowmobile trail to the right that climbs back up to the elevation you left and to the north end of Handle Road, just north of the mountain. Down Handle R and right on the north entrance road and you're back to the base. OOne of the reasons we don't go over there much anymore is, it is fairly grueling and the snowmobile trail back up was incredibly modified from the old twisty four wheeler trail to the wide open, run a snowmobile grooming machine up the highway affair. A memorable adventure though.
    An alternative would involve turning left at the pinic area and trying the "swinging bridge trail" or "road closed road" trail and then back up the old Somerset Road and down the front of the mountain.
    All of these should involve bring tools and food.

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