Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5
Results 101 to 122 of 122
  1. #101
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JustMtnB44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    500
    Quote Originally Posted by anotherbrian
    Beware that 62 linear inches is the common maximum for US carriers for regularly checked luggage. Beyond that it is considered oversized and up to their baggage rates. I've taken my S&S case (26x26x10") more than a dozen times r/t on United and it has never been measured, though YMMV.
    Yes, although I have yet to see anyone ever measure that dimension. They really only check the weight. Since it is a large odd shaped bag and not some kind of box, it is very difficult to measure anyway and the counter people usually don't care all that much. But yes, it is a bit of YMMV.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bula
    JustMtn44: Sounds brilliant. Were you able to get your bike in the bag without removing the fork? Anxiously awaiting those photos.
    Thanks. No, the fork must be removed. But you already need to take the handlebars off to fit a bike in a box, so the only extra step is to remove the front brake caliper. Here are the pictures:

    Bag:


    Frame and fork ready to go in bag:


    Frame and fork and helmet and camelback in bag:


    Wheels in bag:


    Ready to go on plane:


    Also, this is a good video that I used for inspiration.
    http://www.vitalmtb.com/videos/membe...orgeRyan83,311
    Last edited by JustMtnB44; 11-15-2010 at 04:24 PM.

  2. #102
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    718

    Huge Problem

    I just skimmed over this thread. I am going to Phoenix (currently in Virginia) over thanks giving. I am flying jet blue and they carry bikes for $50 each way.

    One HUGE problem they make you sign away all liability!

    Thats right they can loose a bike all together and not be responsible at all and I am expected to pay them 50 bucks for that privilege. Yes I am fuming mad.This is totally un acceptable. I am a shop wrench and make very little and have a bike worth a whole lot. If my bike were lost it would take me over a year to replace it piece by piece even buying every thing at cost. I had to bite the bullet and UPS the thing, which is insurable and requires signatures by the UPS driver ect. WOW ups got a lot more expensive, it was only about 64 bucks last year and this year the same bike (well 2 pounds lighter) in the same size box costs 114 dollars. Ouch. I may just have to start renting. If I have to get bent over with a big expense I would prefer it to be at a bike shop rather than some huge souless company. Rant over.

  3. #103
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    187
    Superuseful post JustMtnB44. I never would have thought of this. Thanks.

  4. #104
    uber-lurker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    26
    I'm heading out to New Zealand in a couple of weeks, and taking my bike with a Sette Travel Bag. One question: how do you keep the large chainring from slicing through the bottom of the bag? Take all the chainrings off? I was thinking of a block of styrofoam under the bottom bracket to elevate the chainring off the bottom of the bag, but not sure how to attach it securely. Any ideas?

  5. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,006
    I cut a length of junked inner tube, knotted the ends, then stretched it around my chainring.

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JustMtnB44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    500
    I took a small cardboard box and fit it around my chainring and crankarm to keep them from cutting through the hockey bag I used and it worked pefectly.

  7. #107
    jcard14
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    138
    Wow! I actually started this thread over two years ago...glad it is still going strong!

    I have flown with my bike 5 or 6 times in the last two years and here is what I have found:

    I live in Miami but have gone to Denver and Portland, OR on my travels...never made it to La Ruta due to a nice training spill in '08. That Costa Rica trip was the reason I started this thread...I had no clue how I was going to get a bike to CR.

    I have only used the Serfas hard case, not the prettiest out there, but it has been perfect and held up exceptionally well. My buddy uses the Thule hard case and he loves it. The bike goes in without taking the fork off and I can break it down and build it back up in a half hour or so.

    As for airlines, I have ONLY flown Southwest. They only charge $50 each way so it is still cheapest way out to do it. On one trip home (luckily not on my way to ride), my box did not make my connecting flight but they had it back to me the next morning. I let the ticketing agent know that a few weeks later on another trip with the bike and they waived the $50 fee for me.

    TSA has been an issue, they definitely pop the box open and don't put it all back together the way you, so I did have 2 spokes break on one trip out West. Luckily, I always travel with extras so it was not a problem. As you know, some airports have TSA screening areas that you can watch the screeners rummage through your box, I (very politely) ask to watch. I give pointers on packing when appropriate. They will let you look but not touch the box, to make sure it is locked up securely. The idea from another poster about a kindly worded not seems to be a good idea. I have found that the screeners out West are much more used to handling bike boxes than the ones I deal with in Miami/Ft. Lauderdale, so they definitely do a better job.

    When it comes to renting a car wherever you travel too...don't skimp and not get an SUV...it is a must!!
    C Knife 14
    '10 S-Works SJ...blinged out!
    '10 Blue AC1
    '11 Spot Brand Acme
    '12 S-Works SJ 29er...even more blinged out!!

  8. #108
    Wandering, but not lost
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    73

    Regular luggage size bike box, for FS bikes

    I made a couple of bike boxes out of coroplast, basically it's the corrugated plastic that political signs are made out of. Fairly indestructable stuff. I had made larger bike boxes out of it previously and know that it survives the airline staff very well. So with the new airline bike fees I decided to try to make boxes that would qualify for regular luggage, 62 linear inches total.
    Yes, it means that you've got to do a good amount of taking apart and putting back together of the bike, but the FS bikes that we have I do all the mechanic work on, so it's not that big of a deal.
    Bottom line......it's a tight fit, but it worked. The bikes were a Turner Flux and a Spec FSR. It required removing the crank, taking the handlebars, fork and rear der off, deflating tires, folding up the rear linkage, and stuffing it all in. The box size was 28x24x10.
    Still though, when they asked what was in the boxes, since the airlines don't really spell out the charge for a bike in regular size luggage......."just camping equipment, sir".
    Airline travel with a bike-cimg_1325.jpg
    Airline travel with a bike-cimg_1329.jpg
    Airline travel with a bike-cimg_1346.jpg

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation: V.I. Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    30
    Just my $0.02.

    I traveled to CR last spring with a bag made by Pika Packworks out of Slt. Lake. It's under the size limitation, no fees were added (AA), and the bike (a large Trance) with all the pieces plus ride gear made it in perfect shape. The bag is the "Disc" model which is not listed on his site, but the owner and I chatted a couple of times and he took great care of us (bike and me). He's been making these bags for a number of years (I believe the US Cycling team uses his bags).
    Last edited by V.I. Clyde; 03-08-2011 at 05:22 PM.
    "Somebody left the door open and the wrong dogs came home." The Stranger

  10. #110
    Team NFI
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,100
    Quote Originally Posted by Goatrak
    I made a couple of bike boxes out of coroplast, basically it's the corrugated plastic that political signs are made out of. Fairly indestructable stuff. I had made larger bike boxes out of it previously and know that it survives the airline staff very well. So with the new airline bike fees I decided to try to make boxes that would qualify for regular luggage, 62 linear inches total.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cIMG_1325.jpg 
Views:	2130 
Size:	218.0 KB 
ID:	601450

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cIMG_1346.jpg 
Views:	1398 
Size:	151.3 KB 
ID:	601448

    Interesting. How did you secure the corners ..glue, pop rivets??

  11. #111
    Wandering, but not lost
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    73
    They are basically plastic ratchet type rivets. I know crateworks uses velcro and I've used zip ties on my previous bike box, but these rivets held, not one popped, so pretty robust. I found them here, http://www.mrmcgroovys.com/

  12. #112
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    63

    Pack a starter pistol

    I've seen many posts in this thread referring to the TSA and them not re-packing your bike properly and thought I'd share this little tip. This has worked for my friends who needed to check high end camera gear and there's no reason it wouldn't work with a bike. Pack a starter pistol in the bike box.

    Expensive Cameras in Checked Luggage

    I've only traveled with my bike once (to Japan) and didn't have any issues (didn't pack a pistol with it). Many of my friends have used the above technique to check their expensive camera gear and not had any issues whatsoever.

    If someone tries it let us know if/how it worked!

    Happy travels!

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    483
    Quote Originally Posted by Goatrak
    I made a couple of bike boxes out of coroplast, basically it's the corrugated plastic that political signs are made out of.

    Good job on the boxes. If ever you decide to sell some, let me know!

  14. #114
    cycle dad
    Reputation: taletotell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    223
    Quote Originally Posted by Goatrak
    I made a couple of bike boxes out of coroplast, basically it's the corrugated plastic that political signs are made out of. Fairly indestructable stuff. I had made larger bike boxes out of it previously and know that it survives the airline staff very well. So with the new airline bike fees I decided to try to make boxes that would qualify for regular luggage, 62 linear inches total.
    Yes, it means that you've got to do a good amount of taking apart and putting back together of the bike, but the FS bikes that we have I do all the mechanic work on, so it's not that big of a deal.
    Bottom line......it's a tight fit, but it worked. The bikes were a Turner Flux and a Spec FSR. It required removing the crank, taking the handlebars, fork and rear der off, deflating tires, folding up the rear linkage, and stuffing it all in. The box size was 28x24x10.
    Still though, when they asked what was in the boxes, since the airlines don't really spell out the charge for a bike in regular size luggage......."just camping equipment, sir".
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cIMG_1325.jpg 
Views:	2130 
Size:	218.0 KB 
ID:	601450
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cIMG_1329.jpg 
Views:	1153 
Size:	134.9 KB 
ID:	601449
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cIMG_1346.jpg 
Views:	1398 
Size:	151.3 KB 
ID:	601448
    This looks somehow perverse, like body parts in a box or something.

  15. #115
    cycle dad
    Reputation: taletotell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    223
    Anyone ever send a bike by train? My wife and I shipped some stuff from Portland to Syracuse via train once and it arrived in three days in great shape and it cost us somewhere around $80US for 200lbs. Seems like a bike could ship for $10. I'd be willing to go three days without my bike to avoid rental rates, assuming my bike made it safely.

  16. #116
    cycle dad
    Reputation: taletotell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    223
    Look: http://www.amtrak.com/servlet/Conten...=1241245658041
    "A superb method of SHIPPING a bike IF YOU ARE NEAR AN AMTRAK STATION THAT HANDLES CHECKED BAGGAGE is by train. Box is provided by Amtrak. Box is much larger than those provided by airlines. Have to remove pedals and handlebars but that's all. Roll bike into the box. Give to station agent. Pay $25 to $50 (I was quoted $30 for Seattle to St. Louis). Retreive the bike a few days later at the destination. " -some random guy on the internet.
    Last edited by taletotell; 05-06-2011 at 03:27 PM.

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    46
    Southwest's policy as of today:

    "Non-motorized bicycles, including Bike Friday and Co-Pilot, will be accepted in substitution of a free piece of checked baggage at no additional charge provided the bicycle is properly packaged and the box containing the bicycle fits within the 62-inch sizing limit and weighs 50 pounds or less. (Maximum weight is 50 pounds and maximum size is 62 inches (length + width + height per checked piece of luggage.) The handlebars, kickstand, and pedals must be removed and placed inside the box. A $50.00 each-way charge applies to bicycles that don't meet the above criteria. Bicycles packaged in a cardboard box or soft-sided case will be transported as a conditionally accepted item."

    Now to figure out how to get down to 62 inches, 50 pounds and remove my kickstand! This thread is useful for that, sure I'll find a solution.

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zeeshan66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    56
    another resurrection.

    Is it possible to pack your bike into your suitcase (I have a hard one that will fit my bike). ? I'm thinking of taken off the wheels bubble wrapping the entire thing and throwing in into a suitcase when I travel both domestically and internationally. I typically fly with United.

    Is it legal? - I see everyone spending lots of $ on bike box's and travelling fees etc. If it fits in a suitcase why not?
    2013 Fuji Nevada 1.5 D

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    58
    Of course it is legal. As long as your suitcase fits the baggage size regulations of the airline, this is actually the best option to take a bike on the plane for free. But I doubt your bike fits into a regular suitcase. Only few 26" full suspension frames will fit, I guess. What frame is it?

  20. #120
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zeeshan66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    56
    I figured it would be. I've got a fuji Nevada 1.5 D hardtail. 17" frame. I'm sure it can fit with room to spare in a larger suitcase. Can't wait to take it to Trinidad with me next time. I've also got a euro trip planned this year that i'll be sure to bring it along with me.
    2013 Fuji Nevada 1.5 D

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    200
    Good to see this thread bumped up. I would love to hear about recent anecdotes from people who have flown with their bikes.
    Heading to Europe this summer. I'm resigned to the reality that it'll cost a few hundred bucks round trip, but don't want any surprises along the way.

    Scenarios that concern me:
    1. Rather than charging just the $200 fee for a bike, they charge me $100 for additional luggage + $200 for exceeding 62 inches + $200 for exceeding 50 lbs. Since the airlines don't tend to clarify whether the charges are stacked or not, my imagination is creating worst-case scenarios. $500 bucks would be hard to swallow, one way.
    2. I get through immigration in connecting country and when I re-check-in for the final flight on "partner" airline, they charge me all over again. This could be another $200 bucks or another $500 bucks (see above). My mind is ready to explode now!
    3. Connector flight is on a small commuter plane that is not capable of carrying a bike.
    4. Flight doesn't have room for oversized luggage (Lufthansa in particular specifically mentions this as a possibility on their flights). Then what the heck do you do?
    5. Damage. I'm only really interested in first or second hand stories that have occurred in recent times. Sure, anyone can imagine horrible things happening, but do they really happen? Is a hard case really worth the extra cost/weight when shipping a bike designed for durability (ie not a road bike)?
    6. Is it really true that sometimes they just choose not to or forget to charge you the oversized fee? Would be a nice perk.

    Any and all stories would be greatly appreciated and welcome.

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joules's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,312
    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    1. Rather than charging just the $200 fee for a bike, they charge me $100 for additional luggage + $200 for exceeding 62 inches + $200 for exceeding 50 lbs. Since the airlines don't tend to clarify whether the charges are stacked or not, my imagination is creating worst-case scenarios. $500 bucks would be hard to swallow, one way.
    I've never had that happen. It might be worth a call to the airline before buying a ticket. On international flights, I'm always a little nervous that checking the bike and paying for it isn't taken care of in advance, but no horror stories yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    2. I get through immigration in connecting country and when I re-check-in for the final flight on "partner" airline, they charge me all over again. This could be another $200 bucks or another $500 bucks (see above). My mind is ready to explode now!
    Only one experience here; on a flight from JFK to Marrakech with a layover in Madrid. JFK-MAD was on American, MAD-RAK was on Ibera as an American partner. No issue at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    3. Connector flight is on a small commuter plane that is not capable of carrying a bike.
    4. Flight doesn't have room for oversized luggage (Lufthansa in particular specifically mentions this as a possibility on their flights). Then what the heck do you do?
    the MAD-RAK flight mentioned above was in the smallest plane I've been on in a long time; a 40 or so seater. I'd guess they put that disclaimer in as a CYA, not that it's likely to happen. I believe they only use those tiny planes for less popular routes, so it's less likely they have a full flight's worth of baggage to fit.
    If it happens, I believe they'll put it on the next flight that has room. That's worth asking if you call.

    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    5. Damage. I'm only really interested in first or second hand stories that have occurred in recent times. Sure, anyone can imagine horrible things happening, but do they really happen? Is a hard case really worth the extra cost/weight when shipping a bike designed for durability (ie not a road bike)?
    I have a hard-side case (Trico), it's been on a couple dozen flights and the contents have never been damaged. If you are coming from or through the US, I worry more about TSA not getting it back in the the case after their inspection than baggage handlers. I've seen enough success with soft-side cases that I'm considering getting one (EVOC), not for weight but just because it's so hard to fit an XL bike in the ironcase, which is the biggest hardside I know of.

    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    6. Is it really true that sometimes they just choose not to or forget to charge you the oversized fee? Would be a nice perk.
    Don't hold your breath. It has happened to me, though I can't remember the last time; not in the last 3-4 years. Baggage fees are going up, airlines profits are down.

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •