Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    18

    White Rim, Current Conditions? (November 2013)

    Howdy,
    Anyone been on the White Rim lately? How are the road conditions? Mud, Sand, Snow? Planning to hit it on Saturday for a WRIaD loop. Weather for the weekend looks dry and warm(ish).

    Thanks,
    Potsie

  2. #2
    Desert Seeker
    Reputation: glesoine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    105
    Well, I have not been out there, but I can tell you that the conditions around Moab are dry and sunny. Just rode in the Brands area yesterday and there was no mud. No snow down at these levels. Can't comment about sand...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    18
    Thanks. I appreciate the info!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    18
    Conditions on Saturday were perfect. Cold start at 5am, shorts by 11 am, cold beers by 5pm. Sandy in the usual spots. A good number of mtb's out, with more bikes than cars!

    Cheers!

  5. #5
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,649
    We were down there for the high school mtb state championships. It was absolutely perfect weather. Glad you got to take advantage of it.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,135
    In case someone is searching for White Rim information, I wanted to give everyone a heads up. We were in Moab over Thanksgiving and decided to make a day trip of driving our Jeep around White Rim. I have been around the loop several times, but it was always during dry conditions.

    The area had 8 inches of wet snow the Saturday before, and we took off on Friday heading clockwise. The Shafer Trail was closed. The higher we got on the loop road, the more snow and mud there was. By the time we got to the shelf road up to Murphy's (we were going clockwise), the road was slick as snot. My Jeep is a Rubicon with mud tires and lockers, and we used them going up and down the other side. Things dried out until we got to Potato Bottom, where we were confronted with about 1/2 mile of deep mud, as in scraping the undercarriage deep. Lockers again. Hardscrabble was also a mess. Then, along the road between Hardscrabble and the Horsethief Road, there was a giant boulder blocking the road, which forced us to squeeze around it through some Tamarisk. Up the switchbacks went fine, but then the last 12 miles back to 313 were simply incredible. A foot deep mix of mud and snow formed into ruts. It was an hour of white knuckling, because if we had slid off of the road, it was going to be a long walk to the highway, and an expensive tow out of the ditch.

    Bottom line: if there is significant moisture, you would have to do a LOT of walking to complete the loop on a bike. In a vehicle, White Rim is considered Class 2, which is Subaru territory, but with significant moisture, do NOT attempt the road without a decent vehicle with high ground clearance, lockers, and mud tires.

  7. #7
    NMBP
    Reputation: crashtestdummy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,982
    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    In case someone is searching for White Rim information, I wanted to give everyone a heads up. We were in Moab over Thanksgiving and decided to make a day trip of driving our Jeep around White Rim. I have been around the loop several times, but it was always during dry conditions.

    The area had 8 inches of wet snow the Saturday before, and we took off on Friday heading clockwise. The Shafer Trail was closed. The higher we got on the loop road, the more snow and mud there was. By the time we got to the shelf road up to Murphy's (we were going clockwise), the road was slick as snot. My Jeep is a Rubicon with mud tires and lockers, and we used them going up and down the other side. Things dried out until we got to Potato Bottom, where we were confronted with about 1/2 mile of deep mud, as in scraping the undercarriage deep. Lockers again. Hardscrabble was also a mess. Then, along the road between Hardscrabble and the Horsethief Road, there was a giant boulder blocking the road, which forced us to squeeze around it through some Tamarisk. Up the switchbacks went fine, but then the last 12 miles back to 313 were simply incredible. A foot deep mix of mud and snow formed into ruts. It was an hour of white knuckling, because if we had slid off of the road, it was going to be a long walk to the highway, and an expensive tow out of the ditch.

    Bottom line: if there is significant moisture, you would have to do a LOT of walking to complete the loop on a bike. In a vehicle, White Rim is considered Class 2, which is Subaru territory, but with significant moisture, do NOT attempt the road without a decent vehicle with high ground clearance, lockers, and mud tires.
    I sitting here dumbfounded while I read this. Why would you keep going if the road was in this bad of shape? It sounds like you left the road totally FUBARed.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,774
    I wasn't going to say anything, but it's not like that trail doesn't see enough damage as-is. I think staying off of it in those type of conditions is common sense.


  9. #9
    NMBP
    Reputation: crashtestdummy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,982
    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    I wasn't going to say anything, but it's not like that trail doesn't see enough damage as-is. I think staying off of it in those type of conditions is common sense.

    True, that has to be a difficult road to keep up with, but ignorant abuse by humans, motorized or not, doesn't help.
    Riding Fat and still just as fast as I never was.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,135
    Quote Originally Posted by crashtestdummy View Post
    I sitting here dumbfounded while I read this. Why would you keep going if the road was in this bad of shape? It sounds like you left the road totally FUBARed.

    Umm, because it would have been NINE HOURS to turn around? We checked with the Park Service before leaving, and they said conditions were "good".

    It isn't like that road hasn't been driven on since 1955 or anything. It is a MAINTAINED road, not a freaking piece of pristine singletrack. It was created by dynamite and bulldozers, and is maintained by road graders and backhoes.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,634
    Yes, but it's still foolish to knowingly damage a road. It's like riding a trail... just because a sign says open doesn't mean it's a good idea to ride it if the conditions suggest otherwise.

    And it wouldn't have been 9 hours to run around if you would have reconsidered after the first significant encounter with mud and snow. Just because you can drive/ride something doesn't always mean you should.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 90
    Last Post: 12-19-2013, 08:59 PM
  2. Typical weather and trail conditions in November?
    By InertiaMan in forum Virginia, WV, Maryland, DC, Delaware
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-28-2013, 07:11 AM
  3. Downieville 2013-Current conditions?
    By zgroove in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 07-15-2013, 01:20 PM
  4. Current trail conditions PDX area February 2013
    By Glide the Clyde in forum Oregon
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: 04-15-2013, 07:50 AM
  5. Replies: 81
    Last Post: 02-15-2013, 05:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •