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  1. #1
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    Mountain Bike Skills Camp

    Want to have more fun on the trails, be more efficient and mountain bike with more confidence? Just like any other sport, to ride with skill you need proper technique. BetterRide’s team of professional coaches is dedicated to teaching riders of all levels the skills to ride in balance, in control & have more fun on their bikes!

    The BetterRide structured skills progression has under gone 13 years of evolution to become the most effective mountain bike skills coaching in the US. With the help of World Champions, top coaches from other sports and 21 years of coaching experience BetterRide founder Gene Hamilton has taught his certified coaches to get you riding at your best.

    In a BetterRide camp you will learn the core skills that over 2,000 mountain bike enthusiasts of all experience levels (including two World Champions and many National Champions) have already invested in.

    Camps are filling up fast, reserve your spot today and start riding up to our potential! Get all the details, read student reviews and register Mountain Bike School, Mountain Bike Camps, coaching by Betterride


    Upcoming Mountain Bike Skills Camps in Utah:

    March 23-25 Hurricane, UT Mountain Bike Camp

    April 20-22 Moab, UT Core Skills 2 Mountain Bike Camp

    April 27-29 Moab, UT Mountain Bike Camp

    May 18-20 Moab, UT Mountain Bike Camp

    June 16-17 Park City, UT Mountain Bike Mini-Camp



    Thanks, Gregg for permission to post these events.
    Skills coaching loved by passionate riders of all levels and trusted by the pros.
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    What is the difference between the April 20-22 and other Moab camps? Core Skills 2 means what compared to a regular camp?

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    Quote Originally Posted by nord1899 View Post
    What is the difference between the April 20-22 and other Moab camps? Core Skills 2 means what compared to a regular camp?
    Thanks for your interest in BetterRide. Our Core Skills 2 camp is for riders who have already attended a BetterRide camp and want to continue their skills progression with further professional instruction. If you have any other questions feel free to check out our FAQ page or shoot an e-mail to Info@BetterRide.net
    Skills coaching loved by passionate riders of all levels and trusted by the pros.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterRide View Post

    March 23-25 Hurricane, UT Mountain Bike Camp

    April 20-22 Moab, UT Core Skills 2 Mountain Bike Camp

    April 27-29 Moab, UT Mountain Bike Camp

    May 18-20 Moab, UT Mountain Bike Camp

    June 16-17 Park City, UT Mountain Bike Mini-Camp



    Thanks, Gregg for permission to post these events.
    Do you know who's lead instructing at the camp highlighted above?
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  5. #5
    Shaman
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    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Do you know who's lead instructing at the camp highlighted above?
    That is yet to be determined, but no matter which certified coach is there, be assured that they will be fluent in the BetterRide curriculum, meticulously trained by Gene, and will have demonstrated to Gene that they can conduct a thorough camp properly. You can read about our coaches here: Coach Bios - BetterRide.net
    Skills coaching loved by passionate riders of all levels and trusted by the pros.
    www.betterride.net

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    How much is the average cost for a 3 day? I am deployed and get home around the time of the June one in Park City

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    Quote Originally Posted by ipalmer13 View Post
    How much is the average cost for a 3 day? I am deployed and get home around the time of the June one in Park City
    Thank you for your service. Pricing and other details about the camps and be found at the bottom of this page. The camp in Park City is a 2 Day Camp and is $537. Feel free to e-mail us at Info@BetterRide.net if you have any other questions.
    Skills coaching loved by passionate riders of all levels and trusted by the pros.
    www.betterride.net

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    Wow, I read the title and thought this would be good for my kids but I definitely have sticker shock. How does your orginization justify $547 for a 2 day clinic?

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    Quote Originally Posted by championp View Post
    Wow, I read the title and thought this would be good for my kids but I definitely have sticker shock. How does your orginization justify $547 for a 2 day clinic?
    My wife and I took the 3-day in Hurricane last March and it was worth every dollar. Even though some of the skills drills were direct crossovers from moto schools I used to teach and which I wrote text for, I gained valuable skills and techniques which have heelped me and the wife become faster, smoother riders while decreasing risk.

    Let me repeat. I ride faster, smoother and do it with less risk. How much is that worth? It's different for all of us.
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  10. #10
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    I agree with STT. I took one of the downhill camps in Bootleg and I was amazed at how much I learned and was able to ride and race faster. Gene and Andy will teach you the skills but you still have to go home and practice them so they really set in. Can't wait to do it again this year!

  11. #11
    N8R
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    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    My wife and I took the 3-day in Hurricane last March and it was worth every dollar. Even though some of the skills drills were direct crossovers from moto schools I used to teach and which I wrote text for, I gained valuable skills and techniques which have heelped me and the wife become faster, smoother riders while decreasing risk.

    Let me repeat. I ride faster, smoother and do it with less risk. How much is that worth? It's different for all of us.
    Or you can just go on youtube watch some how-to-mtb videos and then find some more experienced riders in your area to ride with and save yourself a lot of money. $500 + is a bit ridiculous, unless that includes 6 meals and your hotel.
    Last edited by N8R; 01-17-2012 at 05:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    Or you can just go on youtube watch some how-to-mtb videos and then find some more experienced riders in your area to ride with and save yourself a lot of money. $500 + is a bit ridiculous, unless that includes 6 meals and your hotel and even then that's not a fair deal.
    I heard the same sort of talk when I spent a decade as a certified ski instructor. The fact is, whether you realize it or not there are a lot of things you can learn from a skill based clinic no matter what level you are. I could take any non high level racer skier and teach them something to change the way they ski and I assume the same would be true for these bike clinics.

    Looks like the only people who can't see the value in the clinic are the ones that haven't taken it. Shouldn't that tell you something?
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I heard the same sort of talk when I spent a decade as a certified ski instructor. The fact is, whether you realize it or not there are a lot of things you can learn from a skill based clinic no matter what level you are. I could take any non high level racer skier and teach them something to change the way they ski and I assume the same would be true for these bike clinics.

    Looks like the only people who can't see the value in the clinic are the ones that haven't taken it. Shouldn't that tell you something?
    I agree with you 100% as far as teaching a non-pro something. But the reality of it is that most people aren't ever going to be pro's and won't be riding at that level. Most of the top extreme bikers are self taught and never took "clinics". Many (including myself) are naturals and can just feel how to ride. You can learn pretty much everything you need for non professional riding just by doing it and sharing/comparing stuff with other good riders, for free. Now if you are set on being a Pro and want to ride at the highest level MAYBE it's worth the cost. Some people just naturally are able to pick up skills and feel what it is they need to do. Others will never get to the top level no matter how much they practice. For example, one of the hardest basic skills to learn on a bike is manualing. There are many many Proffesional riders who can't do this and probably will never be able to. For others, it was pretty easy to learn how to do. For me to learn how to manual I just started trying to do it, fell on my back once. With practice I learned where the balance point was and after that could manual downhill as long as I cared to or until my arms and brake finger got tired. These skills camps are a product/service like any other. If someone comes to me and tries to sell me a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for $100, I'll say no thanks, and just make one myself for like $0.50. Now if I was hungry, feeling lazy, and they offered me one for $1, I think I would by it. It's all about fair value.
    Last edited by N8R; 01-17-2012 at 05:30 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    I agree with you 100% as far as teaching a non-pro something. But the reality of it is that most people aren't ever going to be pro's and won't be riding at that level. Most of the top extreme bikers are self taught and never took "clinics". Many (including myself) are naturals and can just feel how to ride. You can learn pretty much everything you need for non professional riding just by doing it and sharing/comparing stuff with other good riders, for free. Unless your a rich yuppie, spending $500+ on a skills camp is a rippoff when you can learn the most important basics for free. Now if you are set on being a Pro and want to ride at the highest level maybe it's worth the cost.
    I'm not really interested in a heated debate, but I will say that unless you've actually taken a clinic like this that you really don't have a leg to stand on. I will admit that I also don't have enough familaity with bike skills clinics to say for certain the level of help they provide but I would very confidently say that it doesn't matter how good you are as a "natural" bike rider, you have plenty to learn no matter what your actual level of riding is.

    I don't know you personally so I hesitate to say that you're too arrogant or ignorant to admit or recognize this, or perhaps you've simply never ridden with people of a really high level, or maybe you're truly a world cup level rider who would have little to learn from a little movement analysis. But I guarantee that even the highest level riders work constantly on their skills, never thinking they are as good as they could ever been and never satisfied with where they are.

    If someone has the money it's not a waste. I wish I had the money to give a skills camp a try, I know there's plenty I could be working on getting better at. I'm sure a few days down at Bootleg would learn the living hell out of me or maybe a few days at Whistler getting more comfortable in the air. And while I'm no pro biker, I can hold my own with the majority of people on any trail that doesn't go uphill too long; that doesn't mean I can't get better.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

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    Quote Originally Posted by championp View Post
    Wow, I read the title and thought this would be good for my kids but I definitely have sticker shock. How does your orginization justify $547 for a 2 day clinic?
    I read that price and had the same initial reaction. Economics dictate that if they can charge $547 and fill the roster, it simply makes good business sense to charge that much. However, in my mind, a price tag like that means that only A) Rich people who can afford it easily, B) Dumb people who think they will get something here that they can't get elsewhere, or C) Extremely passionate people who have very specific improvement goals that can be obtained only through this clinic are going to be willing to pay that amount. You and I are obviously not within any of those categories.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I'm not really interested in a heated debate, but I will say that unless you've actually taken a clinic like this that you really don't have a leg to stand on. I will admit that I also don't have enough familaity with bike skills clinics to say for certain the level of help they provide but I would very confidently say that it doesn't matter how good you are as a "natural" bike rider, you have plenty to learn no matter what your actual level of riding is.

    I don't know you personally so I hesitate to say that you're too arrogant or ignorant to admit or recognize this, or perhaps you've simply never ridden with people of a really high level, or maybe you're truly a world cup level rider who would have little to learn from a little movement analysis. But I guarantee that even the highest level riders work constantly on their skills, never thinking they are as good as they could ever been and never satisfied with where they are.

    If someone has the money it's not a waste. I wish I had the money to give a skills camp a try, I know there's plenty I could be working on getting better at. I'm sure a few days down at Bootleg would learn the living hell out of me or maybe a few days at Whistler getting more comfortable in the air. And while I'm no pro biker, I can hold my own with the majority of people on any trail that doesn't go uphill too long; that doesn't mean I can't get better.
    I'm not into heated debates either so I will keep it civilized. I never said I had nothing to learn or that my skills couldn't improve. What I said is that you don't need to spend ridiculous amounts of money to learn stuff that you can learn for little or even free. If someone was offering a skills course for say oh $50 or so I might be willing to check it out and try to learn something new but $500 is ridiculous. That's been my point. I'm not above someone showing me a thing or two. I'm above being ripped off ( well willingly at least). I'm not an arrogant person, incase that's how I came across. By saying I'm a natural I was merely stating that riding comes to me naturally and was trying to demonstrate a point that I've been able to learn the most important skills on my own but also by just getting out and riding with other good riders and being aware of riding techniques. You feed off of each other and learn by seeing what the other guy is doing. I guess technically you could say that every time we go out riding with other people it's a skills camp. Always learning and always trying to improve. No need to pay $500 for it. ( By the way I have ridden with world class riders and I don't care to ever be one. It's not worth it IMO )
    Last edited by N8R; 01-10-2012 at 08:11 PM.

  17. #17
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    Several points:

    1) I would love to do this...It sounds fun.

    2) I can think of a hundred bike related items I would rather buy for that price.

    3) Do you know how many skilz building races I could enter for that price?

    4) At that price...

    This is definitely a disposable income type event and in this economy there isn't much of that going around. The organizers of this clinic have got to compete for those meager dollars with other things. I'm sure this is pretty hard to justify for well over 99% of MTB'ers.
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  18. #18
    rpalmer
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    And many days later, the guy who posted the ad and the price is nowhere to be found... Its bad enough for business to post such a ridiculous price, even worse to not get on and defend it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpalmer View Post
    And many days later, the guy who posted the ad and the price is nowhere to be found... Its bad enough for business to post such a ridiculous price, even worse to not get on and defend it.
    We have been too busy registering stoked students into our camps! My research indicates that reputable organizations that coach other sports charge a similar amount for 19-21 hours of field-based training. We offer a money back guarantee to riders who take the camp and are not satisfied. We coached over 500 students in 2011 and had zero ask for the refund. We don't "defend" it because we don't want anyone to take the camp if they don't feel it is worth the price.

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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    I'm not into heated debates either so I will keep it civilized. I never said I had nothing to learn or that my skills couldn't improve. What I said is that you don't need to spend ridiculous amounts of money to learn stuff that you can learn for little or even free. If someone was offering a skills course for say oh $50 or so I might be willing to check it out and try to learn something new but $500 is ridiculous. That's been my point. I'm not above someone showing me a thing or two. I'm above being ripped off ( well willingly at least). I'm not an arrogant person, incase that's how I came across. By saying I'm a natural I was merely stating that riding comes to me naturally and was trying to demonstrate a point that I've been able to learn the most important skills on my own but also by just getting out and riding with other good riders and being aware of riding techniques. You feed off of each other and learn by seeing what the other guy is doing. I guess technically you could say that every time we go out riding with other people it's a skills camp. Always learning and always trying to improve. No need to pay $500 for it. ( By the way I have ridden with world class riders and I don't care to ever be one. It's not worth it IMO )

    You might want to check out our blog article about "Why Our Instincts Fail Us" - it relates to the idea of Natural Athlete and figuring stuff out by "feel" alone. Just some food for thought. Totally agree that you are learning every time you ride - the question to ask is: What are you learning (skills vs bad habits further ingrained)?

  21. #21
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    Gene's camps are worth every penny. I did one back in 06' and the things I learned fundamentally changed the way I ride for the better. Although I have no intention of ever being a pro, you learn things in those camps that make you go faster. Faster = more fun for me. Since I coach for a living (in another sport) maybe it's easier for me to "get it" that good instruction in a small group setting is the best way to get better. For me, the small group is the best part because you get plenty of attention but you also get to see up close the same or similar instruction applied to others and what they do with it. Seeing another rider do something wrong, then get something right is sometimes easier than seeing your own mistakes.

    As others have mentioned, you could do a lot component wise for $500, but there's no $500 part, besides an engine, that's going to add as much speed to your riding as one of these camps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I'm not really interested in a heated debate, but I will say that unless you've actually taken a clinic like this that you really don't have a leg to stand on. I will admit that I also don't have enough familaity with bike skills clinics to say for certain the level of help they provide but I would very confidently say that it doesn't matter how good you are as a "natural" bike rider, you have plenty to learn no matter what your actual level of riding is.

    I don't know you personally so I hesitate to say that you're too arrogant or ignorant to admit or recognize this, or perhaps you've simply never ridden with people of a really high level, or maybe you're truly a world cup level rider who would have little to learn from a little movement analysis. But I guarantee that even the highest level riders work constantly on their skills, never thinking they are as good as they could ever been and never satisfied with where they are.

    If someone has the money it's not a waste. I wish I had the money to give a skills camp a try, I know there's plenty I could be working on getting better at. I'm sure a few days down at Bootleg would learn the living hell out of me or maybe a few days at Whistler getting more comfortable in the air. And while I'm no pro biker, I can hold my own with the majority of people on any trail that doesn't go uphill too long; that doesn't mean I can't get better.

    That pretty much sums it up.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8R View Post
    Or you can just go on youtube watch some how-to-mtb videos and then find some more experienced riders in your area to ride with and save yourself a lot of money. $500 + is a bit ridiculous, unless that includes 6 meals and your hotel and even then that's not a fair deal.
    Not even close to the same transfer of skills and coaching. That's like saying "watch a few porno's and then you'll kow how to f#ck..." LOL!!!
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideBetter View Post
    You might want to check out our blog article about "Why Our Instincts Fail Us" - it relates to the idea of Natural Athlete and figuring stuff out by "feel" alone. Just some food for thought. Totally agree that you are learning every time you ride - the question to ask is: What are you learning (skills vs bad habits further ingrained)?
    I wouldn't call the way many natural athletes learn, learning by instinct alone. I have never relied on feel alone. The natural athlete just has a heightened awareness, feeling, connection, and balance. Sometimes our interpretations can be off or we can miscalculate what our bodies/minds feel, but the majority of the time a skilled natural athlete is doing what works best for them. However, sometimes walls are hit, or problem areas show themselves. The intelligent athlete, in addition to feel, also analyzes what he is doing, and conducts trial and error experiments, as well as consults with peers. There is no such thing as a perfect rider. Even the best of the best have bad habits and less than efficient techniques "ingrained" that they further ingrain every time they ride. They just have less of them than lesser riders. This is an accurate statement because all riders can always improve. If they didn't have "bad habits" they couldn't improve and they would be perfect. And it is guaranteed that there are even some bad habits that are being taught in your skills camp. How can I say this? Because riding, or man's interpretation of the most efficient way to handle a bike, is always evolving. Some techniques have stuck around, but others are yesterdays tech when a better way is developed and learned. I have nothing against Skills camps or professional instruction as I am doing the same thing they are doing. The main difference is I am doing it for myself and those I ride with ( just as they are doing it for me also) and we aren't paying a lot for it. We are not professional riders and don't need to ride at that level and therefore don't need the extra little tweaks and ideas in training that they use. How do I know that I don't need these? Well, I've been riding since 1993, have been having a blast doing it, and have never had any cycle related injuries because I always try to ride within my limit. I ride and do what is fun for me and I am safe about it. There is no value for me to pay a huge sum to learn things that I don't need. It might be nice to learn a few new things or correct a couple bad habits, but that is not a need. It's a luxury at best, and I am not uncomfortable in anyway with my riding. What it comes down to is each person has to decide for themselves where the value is. The fact is most people don't have a lot of money and can find much cheaper ways to become a skilled and sufficient rider. I will read your article though.....
    Last edited by N8R; 01-17-2012 at 05:37 PM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    That pretty much sums it up.
    What pretty much sums it up is that most people don't have an extra $500 to use unwisely

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