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Thread: Moab Bike Prep

  1. #1
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    New question here. Moab Bike Prep

    The plans are set for a Moab trip in late April. New Nomad was picked up yesterday and I'm wicked stoked!

    New bike came with Kenda Nevegal/Blue Groove tires, but a folded bead which I've never used. I was wondering if this would be okay for Moab or should I look into a wire bead for the trip.

    Then I thought, "Well, I wonder what else I should do to prep my bike before I go?"

    So experts...Please add what you'd like.

    Kat
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  2. #2
    Mojo0115
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    My prep for a Moab weekend is to ride the previous weekend.

    You will be all set, if anything goes wrong there are a bunch of excellent shops in town full of friendly bike mechanics.

    Prep by riding a lot!

  3. #3
    should know better.....
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    Kevlar/Folding beads are absolutely fine, especially for a bike like the Nomad. You do not need a heavy duty DH casing wire bead tire. I would go with 2.3" or so minimum, and carry spare tubes etc, or go tubeless/stan's. Dry lube/ Krytech etc. for your chain. The red, fine dust will get EVERYWHERE. You'll be finding it for years.

    Fitness will make your trip more fun. You'll be able to enjoy the scenery and techy riding instead of just "surviving" the climbs at 4,000 feet.

  4. #4
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    Smile Me too!

    [QUOTE=SuperKat]The plans are set for a Moab trip in late April. New Nomad was picked up yesterday and I'm wicked stoked!


    Awesome! I'm going there too April 11 - 19th. It will be mine first time, but everyone else's umptith time.

    I'm shipping my Titus Racer X to Salt Lake City and we will be driving down since are friends live in Park City.

    I was told to bring extra tubes even though I run tubeless. Multitool and a pump. Air cartages and flamable lube will not be allowed on the plane.
    Bring water bottles and a hydration pack
    Lots of snacks for the ride including Electrolyte mix.
    Extra contacts, 2nd set glasses, and saline nasal spray (the dry air is difficult to breathe)
    Must bring warm clothes for the 50 degree mornings, some rain gear just in case.
    Swimsuit for the hot tub
    I'm considering my headcam and camera
    Extra cleats and bag of mixed bolts for the bike.
    Extra deraileur hanger
    4 sets of gloves and helmet liners
    A game plan for which trails you want to do and how you intent to do them.
    Hope that helps.
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  5. #5
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    you can bring your C02 pump and just buy a cartridge at a LBS.

  6. #6
    JMH
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    Good call on the extra pair or two of contacts. Even if you don't lose one, it can be a great relief to swap out to a new pair after a particularly dry, dusty ride

  7. #7
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    I run two bladders on long or very hot days. one with an electrolyte mix, one with plain water. They suck when you first start out, the weight is considerable, but it gets lighter as you ride and drink, and you stay fresher as the day progresses, again, making the riding ultimately more enjoyable.

    Wearing light colored clothing is a must if it's going to be hot out. You'll stay a lot cooler.

    Use a good waterproof sunscreen on all exposed skin, don't forget the back of your neck and the top of your head if you have short or thinning hair. I apply it like its hair gel and rub it into my entire scalp, back of the ears etc. If not you'll get a leopard print sunburn from your helmet vents.

  8. #8
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    Awesome, thanks for all the advice. We're going the week of the 21st to the 25th of April.
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    Great

    Great, since you are going after my return,...I post the "forgotten stuff" and tell ya the trail conditions. Are you looking to do more XC or Diablo stuff?
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperKat
    The plans are set for a Moab trip in late April. New Nomad was picked up yesterday and I'm wicked stoked!

    New bike came with Kenda Nevegal/Blue Groove tires, but a folded bead which I've never used. I was wondering if this would be okay for Moab or should I look into a wire bead for the trip.

    Then I thought, "Well, I wonder what else I should do to prep my bike before I go?"

    So experts...Please add what you'd like.

    Kat
    If the Kendas are the Stick-E compound and you are into tire conservation you may want to bring a different set of tires, at least for the days with a lot of slickrock riding. That sandstone eats tires like no other, and is especially fond of the softer compounds. If you can find some Motoraptors or maybe the Kendas in the DTC variety (if that's not what you already have) on closeout for $15-20 a tire it might be worth the investment over melting down a set of Stick-Es in a week. Other than that, be prepared for temps anywhere from 40 to probably 90 and you should be good to go. Have fun.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  11. #11
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    +1 on the spare deraileur hanger. Moab square edged rocks likes to eat those.

    Extra tubes for sure. Not a lot of thorns but cut sidewalls and pinch flats are certainly a possibility. I run a little more air pressure in the tires than normal for prevention.

    Like someone else said, there's lots of good bike shops for more major repairs if necessary. Just make sure your bike is well adjusted and ready to ride just like any other trip and have fun. You're going to love it.

    Hey Mountains to Sea, too bad you're arriving in Park City in April. Lots of incredible trail will be burried under 6 feet of snow. It's the perfect time for Moab though. Have fun.

  12. #12
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    Bring tweezers to remove the 200 thorns from your tires that you ride through the night you get to Moab if you are from a place without goatheads.

    You should probably bring a spare derailleur pulley bolt, as well as a spare pulley. You may also want to bring a spare water bottle bolt to replace the one you use to create a makeshift derailleur pulley after you realize that no one brings spare pulleys on a ride. Also, bring a chain tool to turn your bike into a single speed when you realize that the waterbottle bolt is just spinning under the chain when you pedal, causing the sides of the cage to tighten down on the chain making it impossible to pedal more than 100 yards at at a time without loosening the ever-tightening bolt. Bring a second chain tool to replace the chain tool that breaks when you are turning your bike into a single speed. Bring a second chain to replace the chain you throw into the Colorado River. Bring your significant other in order to have someone to tow you back into town.

    And yes, KRob is right. Bring a second der hanger for your ride the next day.
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  13. #13
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    +1 on a spare, worn out, folding rear tire for slickrock. The more worn out the better, if the sidewall is still good.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuky
    Bring tweezers to remove the 200 thorns from your tires that you ride through the night you get to Moab if you are from a place without goatheads.

    You should probably bring a spare derailleur pulley bolt, as well as a spare pulley. You may also want to bring a spare water bottle bolt to replace the one you use to create a makeshift derailleur pulley after you realize that no one brings spare pulleys on a ride. Also, bring a chain tool to turn your bike into a single speed when you realize that the waterbottle bolt is just spinning under the chain when you pedal, causing the sides of the cage to tighten down on the chain making it impossible to pedal more than 100 yards at at a time without loosening the ever-tightening bolt. Bring a second chain tool to replace the chain tool that breaks when you are turning your bike into a single speed. Bring a second chain to replace the chain you throw into the Colorado River. Bring your significant other in order to have someone to tow you back into town.

    And yes, KRob is right. Bring a second der hanger for your ride the next day.

    How can you tell what size derailleur hanger you need for your bike? And do pulleys come in one standard size or do I need a specific size of pulley for my bike? I currently have a SRAM X9, mid cage rear derailleur.
    Cheers,

    Seb

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  15. #15
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    Derailleur hangers are bike brand and even bike model specific. Check with your local bike shop, where you bought your bike, or the nearest dealer. You'll need SRAM pullies, again, check with your LBS. the length of the cage shouldn't matter, but the actual model might.

  16. #16
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    Thank You

    I will go to my LBS to find out which hanger i need. Thanks for your help.
    Cheers,

    Seb

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  17. #17
    Forget work- let's ride!
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    I'm heading out the same week, looking to ride with Solfun Tours.

    I can't wait!
    I'm trying to think but nothing happens!

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Mtnz2Sea]
    Quote Originally Posted by SuperKat
    I was told to bring extra tubes even though I run tubeless. Multitool and a pump. Air cartages and flamable lube will not be allowed on the plane.
    Bring water bottles and a hydration pack
    Lots of snacks for the ride including Electrolyte mix.
    Extra contacts, 2nd set glasses, and saline nasal spray (the dry air is difficult to breathe)
    Must bring warm clothes for the 50 degree mornings, some rain gear just in case.
    Swimsuit for the hot tub
    I'm considering my headcam and camera
    Extra cleats and bag of mixed bolts for the bike.
    Extra deraileur hanger
    4 sets of gloves and helmet liners
    A game plan for which trails you want to do and how you intent to do them.
    Hope that helps.
    Don't forget TP, if you do you can use a nice smooth flat rock or 2" diameter piece of a smooth branch. Check under the rock for scorpins or other inhospitable critters. Also a cell phone works on a lot of the trails for emergencies.

    Remember to not scare the elk, especially with new calves. The local sharp shooters are concerned that mountain bikers are scaring the elk and reducing their herd size. It's too bad that the hunters haven't figured out what the real problem is.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    It's too bad that the hunters haven't figured out what the real problem is.
    LOL. Exactly. That reminds me of a comment a hunter made at a trail/land use meeting I was at once and my subsequent response. He was going on about how the increasing number of trails broke up the elk habitat which was decreasing the herd size and I commented that I didn't think it decreased the herd size nearly as much as shooting them did. He didn't seem too pleased. Hunting is sacred around here.

    I'm just not diplomatic (or patient) enough to attend many of those meetings. I probably do more harm than good. They are incredibly frustrating affairs. I write my letters and comments and attend when needed.... but thank goodness for those who attend frequently and often and those we support to represent us. Join IMBA or you local trail advocacy group!

  20. #20
    frejwilk
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    [QUOTE=traildoc]
    Quote Originally Posted by Mtnz2Sea

    Don't forget TP, if you do you can use a nice smooth flat rock or 2" diameter piece of a smooth branch. Check under the rock for scorpins or other inhospitable critters. Also a cell phone works on a lot of the trails for emergencies.

    Remember to not scare the elk, especially with new calves. The local sharp shooters are concerned that mountain bikers are scaring the elk and reducing their herd size. It's too bad that the hunters haven't figured out what the real problem is.
    Probably not going to run into too many elk on trails you'll be riding in late April in Moab.

    Smooth rocks and sticks? Better than scorpions I guess.

  21. #21
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    [QUOTE=frejwilk]
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    Probably not going to run into too many elk on trails you'll be riding in late April in Moab. Smooth rocks and sticks? Better than scorpions I guess.
    frejwilk:

    I thought the Forest Service was doing a study in the UPS area to see if it might be an elk calving site and doesn't the Kokopelli go right by that area? Maybe it's too early to ride the Kokopelli in April. If the UPS was made legal this season can you access it from the lower Kokopelli trail that exits onto Sands Flat Road or would that lower section still have snow on it?

  22. #22
    frejwilk
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    [QUOTE=traildoc]
    Quote Originally Posted by frejwilk

    frejwilk:

    I thought the Forest Service was doing a study in the UPS area to see if it might be an elk calving site and doesn't the Kokopelli go right by that area? Maybe it's too early to ride the Kokopelli in April. If the UPS was made legal this season can you access it from the lower Kokopelli trail that exits onto Sands Flat Road or would that lower section still have snow on it?
    UPS is not a legal trail. I understand the NFS has a potential reroute, but that trail will not likely be made legal this spring.

    I've not heard of any studies regarding elk calving sites in that area. Certainly elk do spend time around the LaSal loop road / Kokopelli trail intersection. I don't think I've ever seen one while riding below the loop road though.

    April is usually too early to ride that section of the Kokopelli trail. There is some very messy, clay based soil there. Shuttles typically don't take people up there in April. May is usually when folks start riding there.

    FW

  23. #23
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    witz in moab

    Quote Originally Posted by zzsean
    My prep for a Moab weekend is to ride the previous weekend.

    You will be all set, if anything goes wrong there are a bunch of excellent shops in town full of friendly bike mechanics.

    Prep by riding a lot!

    Sean,

    you in moab, boy ... me too. good advice. aslo, an excellent blog. a visit to zzseans blob is like a visit to ......moab

  24. #24
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    Keep in mind that Moab eats bikes . . . but stay cool because there are plenty of shops to get that bike fixed. April can be warm in Moab or it could be cool. You do not need two water bladders if it is cool. Be prepared for both. There is a lot of snow in the hills this year, so any trails that are high up will probably be snowed in. Porcupine will be open of course.

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