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Thread: Frame Repair

  1. #1
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    Frame Repair

    Anyone have any experience with getting their aluminum frame repaired/modified in the Salt Lake valley? I found a crack on my Mach 429 frame and want to get it stitched up and reinforced. I have spoken with a few local sheetmetal shops but thought I would ask the hive mind here before making a decision.

  2. #2
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    obvious questions

    What about the warranty from Pivot?

    There is a guy that advertsing frame repair on ksl in the bike section. I have not had a frame repaired just see the ads.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

    http://www.vrbo.com/392904

    PM me

  3. #3
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    I bought the frame second hand so the best Pivot can do is sell me a new rear triangle - which wont be available for another month anyway.

    Plus, getting a new rear triangle would just expose me to the same failure again since it is a crack in an area where there is just a big stress concentration. I intend to have the person grind out the crack, fill it with weld bead and then make some gussets to support the structure.

  4. #4
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    Not sure about local...

    but post pics and ?'s here:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/frame-buildin...10c58d4b65fb9f

    Those guys can give a good idea if it is even possible to repair.

    Keep in mind that Al will have to be heat treated post repair to retain it's strength.

    frog

  5. #5
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    I had wondered about the heat treat. I'll look into that. Do you know if I can run a heat treat with anodizing still on the frame? I dont know much about the condition the metal needs to be in for a heat treat process.

    EDIT: A heat treat on this type of aluminum (6000 series) after a repair is really just going to be a kind of stress relief treatment that relieves the internal stresses from the welding repair process followed by an elevated temp aging process right? If so, that means a kind of 'artificial aging" process at a relatively low temperature (<500F) right? It has been awhile since my last Materials class and I haven't had to deal with this type of information for quite awhile.
    Last edited by Brownni; 06-06-2012 at 09:14 AM. Reason: More thoughts

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1 cog frog View Post
    Keep in mind that Al will have to be heat treated post repair to retain it's strength.

    frog
    After looking up the material properties for 6061-T6 Al (which is what I am assuming the frame is made of) I found that the Aging temperature is around 320*-350*F.

    If I remember correctly, the welding process would basically cause the precipitates in the local area to be bigger inside the crystal structure and aging the material in the oven at that temp for a few hours would distribute those precipitates back into the crystal structure as necessary to bring the strength back to where it needs to be. Can anyone confirm or correct me?

  7. #7
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    You could try WaltWorks (I think they just moved to SLC). I'm not sure if he works with Al though.

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