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  1. #1
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    Can I still ride Deer Valley on a 91 Bridgestone with no shocks?

    My wife and I want to do a little Utah mountain biking. Back in 1992 or so we took our mountain bikes to Deer Valley, bought lift passses and had a great time.

    We never did it again.

    It has now been 20 years or so, and we are wanting to do again.

    Here is the difficulty:
    1) we are no longer young
    2) we are still riding the our bridgestone mountain bikes we bought at Highlander in Provo more than 20 years ago. .

    No shocks. No disc brakes. No skills. We have been mostly road biking the last 10 years. Just a few short trips on the old mountain bikes. Nice non-rocky trails are what we are really looking for.

    With all that being said, is Deer Valley still a good place to go? If not there, where?

    We will actually be coming from Logan, if that makes a difference, and we only have a couple of days before we have to get back to Arizona.

    thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Yes you can.

    Alot of the trail in park city will be smoother and easier then you remember. Personally I think you would have a better time on a rental bikes.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

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  3. #3
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    I didn't really consider rental bikes as an option. But we already dragged our bikes all the way from Arizona. And besides shocks, are new bikes that much better?

    Again, we are old, and not likely to be going that fast. At least intentionally.

  4. #4
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    One more thing. I also considered going to Canyons, but when I look at their map all the biking trails seem to labelled "difficult" or "more difficult" Not really what we were looking for.

  5. #5
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    I went to DV about a month ago with some Air Force guys who had hard tails, nice hard tails, but still hard tails. Both went in and rented bikes (Giant Reigns with 6" of travel) after the first run. There is enough rocks and some roots and other crap (like brake bumps) that make a full squish bike that much nicer there. Add in the small to medium sized stunts, and you'll definitely want a full squish.

    But it is doable on an older bike.

  6. #6
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    Is it full rigid? 91 there is a good chance it is.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by While At Rome View Post
    Is it full rigid? 91 there is a good chance it is.
    Yeah, to clarify our Bridgestone bikes are full rigid. And 2.1 tires to boot.

    Back in 1991 Mr. Peterson was still holding out on the no shocks thing.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nord1899 View Post
    I went to DV about a month ago with some Air Force guys who had hard tails, nice hard tails, but still hard tails. Both went in and rented bikes (Giant Reigns with 6" of travel) after the first run. There is enough rocks and some roots and other crap (like brake bumps) that make a full squish bike that much nicer there. Add in the small to medium sized stunts, and you'll definitely want a full squish.

    But it is doable on an older bike.
    6 inches of squish seems like a lot. I am not sure you are comprehending how vintage our vintage mountain bikes are. We have no squish.

  9. #9
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    Yes new bikes are alot better

    The Geometry of mountain bikes has changed since the early 90's and the newer FS rental bikes are going to let you sit more upright and be more comfortable. Combine the better position with better brakes, better tires, Vastly better suspension, better steering, you get the idea. 6 inches of travel sounds like alot but if you are riding the lifts up and working your way down it will make for a much more comfortable experience. If you are planning to do much pedaling uphill I would get something closer to 4 inch travel.

    Another option if you don't want to rent bikes is just to ride the bikes that you have on the rail trail. I am not extremly familar with its entire length but the sections that I have rode were pretty flat and would make a great beginner ride.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

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  10. #10
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    You guys are being too nice and the truth isn't being told as a result, dang political correctness! Tell it straight for the OP's benefit: you'll have a horrific time at DV riding your current bikes and will be run over by other riders. It won't only be better to ride a bike with at least 6'' of travel, but it will be much, much safer for you and your wife. I can't fathom taking a fully rigid, cantilever brake, and likely 73 degree head angle bike down ANY of the DV lift accessed trails safely! Your bikes are fine for mild xc trails in PC, but NONE of the lift accessed ones. THE END.
    I like bikes.

  11. #11
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    If you are an experienced rider you will be fine but keep in mind the top quarter mile getting off bald mountain is pretty rocky with a lot of switch backs. I have seen a number of "recreational riders" have significant trouble getting down.

    In reality it is not that tough but it has an exposed and loose feel especially if you don't ride off road a lot.

    Once you get to the meadow, the trails become more typical singletrack.

    As already mentioned, there are still a lot of rocky sections even on the easier routes. They are not technical but riding fully rigid you will get a work out.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjpitts View Post
    And besides shocks, are new bikes that much better?
    With out getting into the many details, and resounding yes would be the answer to that question.

  13. #13
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    As I said in my initial post, we did this back in 1992. It was fun, even on our shockless-hardtail bikes. I remember the trails being mostly nice smooth single track.

    But that was nearly 20 years ago. Maybe my memory is not that clear. And maybe the trails have gotten worse now that everyone has shocks.

    But I do have proof-- here is a picture from Deer Valley in 92 (or maybe 93). Steel Lugged Frames. Thumb shifters. No shocks. Cantilever brakes. Toe Clips.

    But it was still a blast.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Can I still ride Deer Valley on a 91 Bridgestone with no shocks?-deer-valley-92.jpg  

    Last edited by sjpitts; 07-27-2012 at 02:35 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wasea04 View Post
    You guys are being too nice and the truth isn't being told as a result, dang political correctness! Tell it straight for the OP's benefit: you'll have a horrific time at DV riding your current bikes and will be run over by other riders. It won't only be better to ride a bike with at least 6'' of travel, but it will be much, much safer for you and your wife. I can't fathom taking a fully rigid, cantilever brake, and likely 73 degree head angle bike down ANY of the DV lift accessed trails safely! Your bikes are fine for mild xc trails in PC, but NONE of the lift accessed ones. THE END.
    First, I am not offended by what you are saying in the slightest. I prefer honest opinions to PC any day.

    And what you say makes a lot of sense-- but what do you think about the fact that I have done this before, on these exact same bikes, and had a blast? Are the trails that much worse? Are there no easy trails up there?

    And while I have you-- what are the wife and hardtail friendly XC trails in PC that you would recommend?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by string View Post
    If you are an experienced rider you will be fine but keep in mind the top quarter mile getting off bald mountain is pretty rocky with a lot of switch backs. I have seen a number of "recreational riders" have significant trouble getting down.

    In reality it is not that tough but it has an exposed and loose feel especially if you don't ride off road a lot.
    Can you avoid these rough sections? I noticed that several of trails were rated easy on the DV map. We would probably stick to those if it is possible. Rocks really do suck with no shocks. And loose rocks are a real pain in any event.

    Quote Originally Posted by string View Post

    Once you get to the meadow, the trails become more typical singletrack.

    As already mentioned, there are still a lot of rocky sections even on the easier routes. They are not technical but riding fully rigid you will get a work out.
    That sound like what I remember.

  16. #16
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    Hit up youtube, there are quite a few mtn bike videos highlighting Deer Valley which will give you an idea of what the trails are like (for example, Nail Driver a blue trail).

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nord1899 View Post
    Hit up youtube, there are quite a few mtn bike videos highlighting Deer Valley which will give you an idea of what the trails are like (for example, Nail Driver a blue trail).
    That was a great idea. It doesn't look that horrible.


  18. #18
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    Just to keep in mind, the is one of the easier blue trails. And he is on I think a Pivot Firebird, which is a 6.6" travel bike, either that or on a Pivot Mach 429 which is a 29er with 100mm travel.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by wasea04 View Post
    You guys are being too nice and the truth isn't being told as a result, dang political correctness! Tell it straight for the OP's benefit: you'll have a horrific time at DV riding your current bikes and will be run over by other riders. It won't only be better to ride a bike with at least 6'' of travel, but it will be much, much safer for you and your wife. I can't fathom taking a fully rigid, cantilever brake, and likely 73 degree head angle bike down ANY of the DV lift accessed trails safely! Your bikes are fine for mild xc trails in PC, but NONE of the lift accessed ones. THE END.
    I was going to say something like this once i learned they were full rigid.

    Seeing as you probably dont do a ton of cycling, or at least MTB, your body will also like the extra squish. Not to mention much safer with the head angle and hydraulic brakes.

    If you want to do a good ride do the glenwild loop or something. 8 miles, small climbing, mostly tame and easy to get to and find. counter clockwise probably would be the best. If you want to do DV i would rent bikes. Not worth the ticket on the out dated full rigid, ESPECIALLY when you are not super comfortable/confident on your bike. Last thing you want on vacation is a broken wrist or something when yo go over the handlebars.

  20. #20
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    Naildriver, Bermie, and Sunset are what you'd be limited to at DV, and you'd still be run over by others on modern gear. Fire Swamp, Thieves Forest, Alpine Slalom, Sharp Rocks, and NCS are "fuggeddaboutits." I don't know much about PC's singletrack besides Mid-Mt., but those trails should be fine for y'all.

    I admit I somewhat overlooked the above mentioned easier trails as I stick mostly to the right side/east end of the hill where it's steep and technical, but I still think it should be more about what you can enjoy versus what you can barely survive. In comparison to your older gear newer bikes are exponentially better at everything, and thus safer, much safer. I don't doubt at all that you had a blast back in the day, but why not take advantage of the progression of the past twenty years? Also, erosion takes a serious toll on trails, and I've never seen it make a trail easier; rocks become more exposed, ruts emerge, and brake bumps turn into olympic sized moguls
    I like bikes.

  21. #21
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    Go ride Round Valley. It has a good variety of easy and scenic rides. Ride it one day on your bikes, then the next on rentals and you wont even have to take your old bikes home.

  22. #22
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    Deer Valley

    Some trails at deer valley are doable without suspension. Deer valley has a few nice flowy trails (super G, GS Trees),but most trails are technichal, rocky and rooty. Even some sections of nail driver and sunset have small drops and are rocky. Like others said before, I recommend that you should rent bikes if you plan on doing any other trails as they are tough even on a 6" travel bike. NCS, Fireswamp, Freestyle and a few others are for people with not only downhill rigs, but full face helmets and armor.

  23. #23
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    I would rent a bike; Jans, White Pine Touring, and Cole Sport are among the many non-resort options for this. They will also be able to provide some honest trail advice for you no matter what bicycles you choose.

    I think everyone is assuming that riding lifts at DV means the trails that are full on monsters like Fire Swamp or NCS. You can buy a lift ticket to DV and still ride some of the XC stuff. You can start the ride from Silver Lake and ride Mid Mountain, maybe Deer Crest first if your braking fingers are feeling strong.

    OP, remember that a lot of the trails have developed as bikes have developed. There are plenty of mellow trails and you can access many with the lifts, but you'll have much safer and much more enjoyable times on a modern bike, preferably a full suspension rig.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I think everyone is assuming that riding lifts at DV means the trails that are full on monsters like Fire Swamp or NCS. You can buy a lift ticket to DV and still ride some of the XC stuff. You can start the ride from Silver Lake and ride Mid Mountain, maybe Deer Crest first if your braking fingers are feeling strong.

    OP, remember that a lot of the trails have developed as bikes have developed. There are plenty of mellow trails and you can access many with the lifts, but you'll have much safer and much more enjoyable times on a modern bike, preferably a full suspension rig.
    Pretty much this. If the OP wants to give it a shot, go ahead. His bikes won't spontaneously combust or disintegrate. On the easy trails, he isn't gonna be run over by fast DH guys. And if they are finding the trails too rough, the rental shop is right there at the bottom.

    That said, I wouldn't want to ride DV (or anywhere else for that matter) on an old rigid.

    One other note -- Sundance is a little less rocky than DV, except for the first few hundred yards right off the lift. A nice loop around the backside of the mountain that is a nice, scenic ride w/o all the climbing. Cheaper, too, and typically less crowded. That's where I'd go if I were the OP.
    '11 Specialized Enduro Expert for the trails
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Go ride Round Valley.
    +1 to this. Was just introduced to the area this year, and pretty impressed. Never felt like I needed more than my 26" hard tail w/ v-brakes, and tbh my fork wasn't working too hard either.

    Glenwild isn't a bad suggestion either, although it's definitely more climbing than Round Valley.

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