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  1. #1
    destructionismyobjective
    Reputation: bitterrider's Avatar
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    Who rides on 24"s??

    Just wondering. Is this mostly a street/urban thing? Is it easier to toss around a bike w/ 24 in wheels? Oh yeah and are there frame manufacturers that make frames specifically designed for 24s and ss?

  2. #2
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    24 cycles makes frames exclusively for 24's, brodie makes some too. Nemesis Project, Tonic Fab, Union Street Bike.

    I personally am not too fond of 24's, even though I'm only 5'6''(weird eh?). But my friend throws down on 24's and loves it, I jumped his bike some and it handles pretty well. To me, 24's are more for park and straight up urban, smaller stronger hoops mean for less weight and less to worry about breaking.

  3. #3
    destructionismyobjective
    Reputation: bitterrider's Avatar
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    Thanks man. I was wondering cause i got this gf bitter and I love the bike but it is heavy and difficult to toss around. I am also 5'7 so seems like a smaller lighter bike would be good for urban type riding. Im interested in building a 24" ss. The bitter is great but for urban/park type stuff I think another bike may be better suited.

  4. #4
    USB Rep'n
    Reputation: namaSSte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitterrider
    Thanks man. I was wondering cause i got this gf bitter and I love the bike but it is heavy and difficult to toss around. I am also 5'7 so seems like a smaller lighter bike would be good for urban type riding. Im interested in building a 24" ss. The bitter is great but for urban/park type stuff I think another bike may be better suited.
    smaller is possible but don't count on lighter. for urban, you want strength over weight generally. that doesn't mean your frame has to weigh 8lbs but I wouldn't make lightweight a real priority. going to 24's makes the bike smaller and thus more easy to manipulate. in addition, the smaller wheels mean that you have smaller forces at work against you when you try to spin, etc. that can make learning tricks easier to some degree.

    I've been on 2-4s for a few years now (fyi, I ride a Union St. Molly which is 24 specific). Before my Molly, I had a SC Chameleon setup with 24s and even that felt much different than when it had 26s on it. Once I got past the squirrelly feeling, I saw the light and have not looked back.
    though hope is frail, it must prevail - Taj Weekes

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  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Evil4bc's Avatar
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    24's are the way to go for urban,park and street
    ..Personally I have been rideing dule 24's wheeled bikes for almost 9 years now !

    I ride a Nemesis Project streetfigter and 24" DeathMobile both bikes have 24"
    for park I find that the smaller wheel dia works better with the transistion , as well as being able to go fast and higher with a larger wheel dia.
    You also dont fite the rotatinal mass as much as you would with say a 26'
    they also give you more clearence between your crank and front tire for x-up or barspin tricks , as well as deidcated 24 frames like the streetfighter can run a much steeper headangle than a comprable 26".

    24" wheels have much more advantages that most people realize ... and they still remain the black sheep of the bicycle industry .
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  6. #6
    mtbr remember
    Reputation: BikeSATORI's Avatar
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    I'm rockin' the duece-quad on my hot rod. I like it, and agree with Snaky69. Excellent for street shredding, but depending on by who and how the dj's were built, they can be a bit more loopy, unless you are riding straight up bmx jumps, then they still feel gumpy, haha.
    and in fact, contrary to what namaSSte mentioned (although he is generally right IMO), my 24" wheelset is a bit lighter than a lot of 26" wheelsets (which usually need to be more overbuilt with the 9-spd offset crap and since they have a larger diameter that is more prone to flex). 24's are so frickin' stiff, I also have an SS specific, zero-offset rear hub.
    Depending on your frame, I'm not familiar with many GF products, it might be a bit weird just to convert it. how long are your chainstays, and are you using rim or disc brakes?
    Schralp it Heavy.

  7. #7
    destructionismyobjective
    Reputation: bitterrider's Avatar
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    Im not planing on converting it. I was thinking more along the lines of building another bike. The bitter serves its purpose as a good dj and messing around bike. One more thing, are there specific 24" forks or do you just run standard forks?

  8. #8
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    The only 24'' specific suspension fork I know of sucks, (the marzocchi d-street), but yes, you can use a standard fork, just make sure you don't get one with too much travel or it will rake out your frame. An 80mm gold label, or a pike, or an argyle would be your best bets.

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