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Thread: Trials Info.

  1. #1
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    Trials Info.

    I'm not sure if this is the most appropriate place for this question or not.

    I just scored a trials bike for cheap!

    Question is; In what case(s) is a mod. trials bike or a stock trials bike an advantage or disadvantage. Who would be better suited for each?

    I'm mostly using this to help me with my motorcycle trials and for the experience and just to see what it's like.

    Any comments or opinions are welcomed.

  2. #2
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    I don't know if that would help you with moto trials, although it might and I am by no means an authority in the area. As far as the bike question it just depends on what you want. Far as I know a stock bike is more like a regular bike if you're used to that, a mod bike is pretty much perfect trials geometry but don't expect to use it for ANYTHING else. If you're going strictly for trials only maybe a mod bike would be better. If you haven't ridden one, they feel extremely weird when you first get on one. Very finicky and you basically feel like you are on all fours. Except on a bike. Strange. They are very easy to toss around. First time you get on one you almost feel like you can do a perfect trackstand. If trials is what you're going for, worth learning.

    Anyways since nobody else responded I figured I might but I am talking somewhat out of my ass since I don't really do any real trials (want to though), just going off what I've read and seen.

  3. #3
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    Mods are incredibly easy to balance and flick around. Stock bikes are easier to ride and just roll over stuff. The rear mod rims are pretty much unbreakable too. Sovietspyguy was right about the mods when it comes to riding. Trials and that's about it. Stock bikes can be setup for different things. You can run gears and put a seat on and ride some urban. With a mod, you pretty much have to bring your bike to the spot. The best place for info is observedtrials.net. Most of those guys have extensive trials experience. I recommend using the search function though. They will flame you for re-hashing old topics.

  4. #4
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    i ride mod trials as well as street and dj, so i do a blend of both. mod=20 stock=26 stock i like for street better.i put up more later

  5. #5
    resident dumbass
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    next summer, I'm going to put some money together for a 24" heatsink trials frame + full build.
    I'm out of things to say . . .

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    24" sounds good. A 74 year ols gentleman in our moto trials club has an Ibis 24/26" trials bike. It may be 20/24" I can't remember. He can ride the crap out of a moto trials bike and was national 60+ rider 2 or three years in row.

    I do know my Mt. bike riding has helped out in riding moto trials. I put the Monty together tonight. I'll say, it feels pretty damn awkward. It feels tiny. I like a big long stretched out bike for an xc bike so this feels really odd. I can't imagine being able to do many tricks on it but I'll tinker with it for a while and see where it goes. It might be loads of fun in the back yard on days that I don't have time to go anywhere else.

    I notice a few unique bits on this bike that I haven't seen on any other bicycle. First the rectangular straight forks that run the length to the top clamp like a double triple clamp fork. Also, the integrated stem on top of the top triple clamp. Also, I noticed the chain has a master link like a motorcycle. Not a SRAM type link but litterally like a motorcycles master link. Pretty cool. The bike is built in spain, the same place where most of the worlds top motorcycle trials riders come from.

    All in all it's a neat little bike. I wanted a bike that was stricktly trials because I have a trail bike already and am very curious about a stock bike or a trials bike that really works well. This will give me a taste of a true trials bike though. If I like it enough then I'll think about something more serious.

  7. #7
    Goin' Down ain't bad!!!
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    Wow...I just started thinking about trials bikes myself.

    I'm basically a Free Ride - XC junky, but realize having some trails skills would really help my riding. So, I guess "Mod" is a dedicated Trials bike like an Onzo or Monty and a "stocker" is more of a BMX chassis (ie: has a seat)?

    I just discovered this site in England.

    http://www.tartybikes.co.uk/news.php

    Seems the europeans are all over this stuff. Check out some of the videos....amazing.
    Dug-da-Goat

    "Oh momma, could this really be the end? To be stuck outside of Mojo with the High Side Blues again!!!"

  8. #8
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    Mod = Small wheels (looks BMX size)

    Stock = Big wheels (used to mean a slightly modified MTB with seat and gears)
    HB - The God Damn Flying Dutchman
    Chicago Freeride
    Elgin, IL

  9. #9
    Devolution is real!
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    Go to www.observedtrials.net and start reading.

    In the past 4 years the sport has changed a lot. Now a lot of the stocks have high BB and ride like a big mod. This might be a trend but a lot of companies produce a high BB frame.

    What brand of bike did you get?

  10. #10
    Goin' Down ain't bad!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ihatemybike
    Mod = Small wheels (looks BMX size)

    Stock = Big wheels (used to mean a slightly modified MTB with seat and gears)
    So what are the advantages??? I've seen 20", 24" and 26" wheels....I guess 26" is Stock and the others "Mod". Is 24" fading away as a standard and 20" taking over? Is 20" more controllable??? What about competitions...are there Stock and Mod classes???

    Tell me more, tell me more.....
    Dug-da-Goat

    "Oh momma, could this really be the end? To be stuck outside of Mojo with the High Side Blues again!!!"

  11. #11
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    Does anybody know some 24" frames that would be ok for trials?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dropin%Dug
    So what are the advantages??? I've seen 20", 24" and 26" wheels....I guess 26" is Stock and the others "Mod". Is 24" fading away as a standard and 20" taking over? Is 20" more controllable??? What about competitions...are there Stock and Mod classes???

    Tell me more, tell me more.....
    Mods are the most manuverable/flickable.

    Stock is from when riders compeated in all events at MTB comps.

    24" wheels is fairly new with riders doing trials/street hybrid type riding.

    Yes, competitions have seperate classes for Mod and Stock. You can compete in both if you have both bikes. 24" haven't been allowed for sanctioned competition, but the winds of change are blowing and they are starting to gain acceptance into the stock class at some smaller comps.
    HB - The God Damn Flying Dutchman
    Chicago Freeride
    Elgin, IL

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtyharry
    next summer, I'm going to put some money together for a 24" heatsink trials frame + full build.
    dont build dude! buy a used mod bike w/ vs or hydros. its nnot worth building. i traded a sherman for a monty w/ maguras and carbon bars and stuff. ive been riding for over 2 years in trials and that thing still stands up to the abuse. like casing a 4 foot pedal up and landing on the downtube. barely even bent. and get an onza if ye gona build. and for your sake since you probly dont know much about what trials parts to buy, get a used bike, it wont let you down and its cheaper. im getting a stock bike next year thats 1450. and if you can tell me 2 reliable trials site, and how many engagement points a white industries trials fw has, and who makes the hifi and control bikes, you should be set. just buy a simple mod it wont let you down

  14. #14
    resident dumbass
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-dogg
    dont build dude! buy a used mod bike w/ vs or hydros. its nnot worth building. i traded a sherman for a monty w/ maguras and carbon bars and stuff. ive been riding for over 2 years in trials and that thing still stands up to the abuse. like casing a 4 foot pedal up and landing on the downtube. barely even bent. and get an onza if ye gona build. and for your sake since you probly dont know much about what trials parts to buy, get a used bike, it wont let you down and its cheaper. im getting a stock bike next year thats 1450. and if you can tell me 2 reliable trials site, and how many engagement points a white industries trials fw has, and who makes the hifi and control bikes, you should be set. just buy a simple mod it wont let you down
    I don't want a mod, 'cause I want a seat, so I can go places, and I really don't like 20 inch wheels. As far as trials parts, I know enough. I'd get as many parts as I could used, save for probably the frame and drivetrain. The only thing I wouldn't be sure on would be what wheelset would be the best. And what mechanical rim brake would be the best (i really don't want to start hydro until I know how to service it).

    I dunno, maybe I'll just go ahead and grab some Magura HS-33's when I build. Probably not . . .

    Put it this way: I'd make sure the build doesn't cost much more than a complete.
    I'm out of things to say . . .

  15. #15
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    Some people that are making the transition from BMX are more comfortable on mods. So are those who are shorter in stature (though you will find exceptions). As stated, it is near impossible to ride a mod bike to a location. Mod bikes will be lighter, much easier to lift off of the ground, and have geometry that is perfect for trials. The smaller tires will have a tougher time rolling over obstacles, and some people that are used to their mountain frames may feel as though they are on a clown bike in tbhe circus. People are more likely to mistake you for a BMX rider, too.

    A stock bike no longer needs to have gears. The new frames also come without a saddle in most cases. A lot of people feel more at home on a stock bike, especially if they are switching between it and other bikes. Learning trials moves on a stock bike will help you to take what you've learned and apply it to riding your other mountain bikes to a greater extent. Parts are easier to find for stock bikes as well. You can use some DH tires and rims. Mod bikes use a 19" rear rim.

    There is a company out there that is starting to build a couple of trial and urban frames for 24" tires. The name is elluding me right now. It seems as though it may be a good compromise for a lot of people. I went with a new stock bike this year. Building a trials bike part-by-part can get to be extremely expensive. If you can find a used bike for cheap, that may be the best option. You can always resell it if you learn that you want something else.


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