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Thread: Rear Hub

  1. #1
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    Rear Hub

    Looking to get a new rear hub for my DJ bike. Gonna make it a ss. I was wondering if there are any real advantages or disadvantages in getting a cassette hub or a freewheel hub? Which do you prefer and why? I find that I can buy a high quality freewheel, and throw it on a high quality freewheel hub, for much cheaper then buying a high quality cassette hub. Why then would so many buy cassette hubs?

    Please be objective and base opinions on performance only. I don't want to have responses such as, "Freewheels are gay, get a cassette," or, "Cassettes look cooler."

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Freewheels are gay, get a cassette.
    Thinking back to about 10 years ago I remember there was quite a bit of debate in the BMX race scene about which was better. Freewheels would go out a lot (usually at Nationals for some reason) and also lacked in quick engagement compared to brands like King, Profile, and Stealth. I was a trail rider so a 39-14 is usually what I ran so being 16 on a budget I ran a freewheel to due cost. In the MTB DJ/Street scene I think everyone is trying to get their bikes set-up like a BMX bike so a NS Rotary or Atomlab SS is kind of the standard now with being able to run a 9 or 10t driver. They are lightweight, clean looking, loud as hell, and give you cool points. If you're looking to run a 12t or higher you can get by with a typical freewheel... it's just not cool. In a nutshell cassettes keep up with trends of weight savings and style, but also perform great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ/UF View Post
    Please be objective and base opinions on performance only. I don't want to have responses such as, "Freewheels are gay, get a cassette," or, "Cassettes look cooler."
    I don't understand, were you trying to be funny? The only performance points you made were engagement and weight. The freewheels I am looking at have over 120 points of engagement. Weight was only relevant point. The rest was exactly what I asked not to receive.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ/UF View Post
    I don't understand, were you trying to be funny? The only performance points you made were engagement and weight. The freewheels I am looking at have over 120 points of engagement. Weight was only relevant point. The rest was exactly what I asked not to receive.

    Thanks
    Weight, being able to run under a 9 and 10t driver, and style are the advantages. Take the NS rotary hub for example... It's light weight, clean, simple, looks like a BMX cassette, and able to run a smaller single speed one piece driver. Sadly the only reason why cassettes are the norm is because they're better looking.

  5. #5
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    Depending on your frame and DJ set-up, a lot of companies use a 135mm rear and a disc brake. That usually points to a cassette hub for ease and compatability. If using BMX rear 110mm then then changes.

    Personally I like the cssette driver hub styles. As mentioned you can go down to a 9 or 10tooth. Standard cassette bodies you can only go down to a 12t. Also another reason for a normal cassette is for chain line. You can space out the single cog in back as needed to get a perfect chainline (talking MTB 26" DJ mostly).

    When you get to specific frames like my Tonic Fall Guy, you have to go to a 110mm x 14mm so you really only have a driver hub option. But chainline is actually already considered as part of the geometry. As mentioned freewheels are simply cheaper.

    Hope that helps..

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    Thanks guys. The only advantage I initially saw was the smaller driver option, which you both pointed out. However, chainline is a good point I didn't consider. Thanks for the good info.

  7. #7
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    Cassette hubs have sealed cartridge bearings that are replaceable.

    Freewheels usually have some play in the bearings, wear out quicker and aren't sealed. That's why they are so cheap.
    Last edited by Motl500; 04-09-2012 at 08:47 PM.

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