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  1. #1
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    Problmes with manual

    Hi i want to nail this once and for all...

    How to preforme the manual correctly? for example in this video the guy doesnt pull the handelbar at all he is just leanning backwords...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oE2o5...eature=related

  2. #2
    i also unicycle
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    that is correct. it's almost entirely lower body. keep practicing.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
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    well its so frustrating i just keep pulling the front wheel and after a sec it gets back to the ground again even if i lean backwords low or high....i just need to find the right starting point..

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  5. #5
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    10x really helpful

  6. #6
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    from LeeLikesBikes.com




    Also check this out.... I grabbed this photo of the internet and added the Red Triangle.
    ---> If you think of a triangle with your body core, your feet, and the rear tire being points..... then you kind of start to get what it means to push the bottom bracket out forward and then get your body behind the wheel. The rear wheel is below you between those two points.



  7. #7
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    This is partly what i am doing but i guess i am not pulling up hard enough.

    By the way looking forward and not on the front wheel is also helpful

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbullet
    This is partly what i am doing but i guess i am not pulling up hard enough.

    . . . .
    it's not so much about pulling "up" hard.... it's more about shifting your body weight behind the rear wheel and pulling "back" on the bars and pushing your feet/cranks forward to lever the front wheel off the ground.


    this center of mass of a triangle is called a "centroid." if the center of mass is perpendicular to the ground then the triangle will balance on the point. .you can kind of visualize that with manuals too.... by pushing your feet forward you are adjusting the wheel forward to keep it the "triangle" balanced.







  9. #9
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    How hard you need to "pull up" will depend on your bike setup. This is one of the few areas that the bike actually makes a difference in how easy or hard it is to manual. (A good rider can manual just about any setup.)
    Long chainstays, lots of bb drop (low bottom bracket), and low bars will all require more of a pop to get into a manual position. The harder you have to pull, the easier it is to get squirrely!
    The tradeoff, is that sometimes a bike that's harder to get into position will have a larger sweet spot for balance.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sittingduck
    How hard you need to "pull up" will depend on your bike setup. This is one of the few areas that the bike actually makes a difference in how easy or hard it is to manual. (A good rider can manual just about any setup.)
    Long chainstays, lots of bb drop (low bottom bracket), and low bars will all require more of a pop to get into a manual position. The harder you have to pull, the easier it is to get squirrely!
    The tradeoff, is that sometimes a bike that's harder to get into position will have a larger sweet spot for balance.
    Actually i am riding on a stock p1 2010, but i am starting to get this..
    on the begging i though that speed is one of the important keys but now i understand that i can find the sweet spot even on a walking paste speed which helped me a lot getting the confident needed to learn this technique

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbullet
    Actually i am riding on a stock p1 2010, but i am starting to get this..
    on the begging i though that speed is one of the important keys but now i understand that i can find the sweet spot even on a walking paste speed which helped me a lot getting the confident needed to learn this technique

    I have a weird request. Could you please have someone take a picture of you as you manual and post it here. I would like to see an approximation of where the sweet spot on a 2010 P1 is. I am having a ***** of a time getting this done on my 2010 P1. I know a different body will have a different sweet spot on the same bike, but still, it may help me.

  12. #12
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    I don't think that you can be shown the sweet spot. Finding it takes practice. Take your bicycle and find an empty parking lot. Ride perpendicular to the parking lines and start trying to see how far you can hold your front wheel up, one lane, two lanes, three lanes... etc... until you get to a point where you can go far fairly consistently.

    Like other people have said, its more about getting your body back behind your rear wheel. Do not be afraid of the bike flying out from under you in case you go back to far. Its part of the learning curve

    Remember, riding bikes is about riding bikes. The internet can only take you so far.

    Basically, go have fun riding your bicycle.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by boostin
    I don't think that you can be shown the sweet spot. Finding it takes practice. Take your bicycle and find an empty parking lot. Ride perpendicular to the parking lines and start trying to see how far you can hold your front wheel up, one lane, two lanes, three lanes... etc... until you get to a point where you can go far fairly consistently.

    Like other people have said, its more about getting your body back behind your rear wheel. Do not be afraid of the bike flying out from under you in case you go back to far. Its part of the learning curve

    Remember, riding bikes is about riding bikes. The internet can only take you so far.

    Basically, go have fun riding your bicycle.
    Like I said, different bodies on the same bike will move that spot around but seeing someone else on the same bike just might help. There is no harm in asking for more data.

    The parking lot idea is a nice one but you are assuming the parking lots around me are ever empty or not behind chain-link fences with gates and razor wire.

    I cannot remember a time I have not had fun on a bike, btw. I actually commute on my P-DJ because it is a friken blast! The terrain between where I live and where I work is made for a DJ bike. I am just having trouble busting this manual. I see the manual as a final key.

  14. #14
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    I'm just now getting the "sweet" spot set up on my 2010 P1. It's harder then it seems, but I practice it daily now. It seems I always do a crappy one first, then I pull up and lean back a second time and have a decent manual.

    I also found if I straighten my legs, instead of bend them it seems to be better balance.

    Idk about a pic, but I'll try for a video, then I can take a still frame out of that.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by boostin
    I don't think that you can be shown the sweet spot. Finding it takes practice. Take your bicycle and find an empty parking lot. Ride perpendicular to the parking lines and start trying to see how far you can hold your front wheel up, one lane, two lanes, three lanes... etc... until you get to a point where you can go far fairly consistently.

    Like other people have said, its more about getting your body back behind your rear wheel. Do not be afraid of the bike flying out from under you in case you go back to far. Its part of the learning curve

    Remember, riding bikes is about riding bikes. The internet can only take you so far.

    Basically, go have fun riding your bicycle.
    This is totally right , u can learn the basic concept from the internet but trying to learn the small and sensetive detailes will come from your body only...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smasher!
    I'm just now getting the "sweet" spot set up on my 2010 P1. It's harder then it seems, but I practice it daily now. It seems I always do a crappy one first, then I pull up and lean back a second time and have a decent manual.

    I also found if I straighten my legs, instead of bend them it seems to be better balance.

    Idk about a pic, but I'll try for a video, then I can take a still frame out of that.
    That would be cool. If you can't no biggie. I'm having a kinesthetic problem where I don't know when to push out and how to pull up/back. I know it is only a matter of time before I "get it". I wish I had more time to work on it daily like you can. I also wish I had east access to a pump track. That experience might inform me of some of the physics involved.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayenn
    That would be cool. If you can't no biggie. I'm having a kinesthetic problem where I don't know when to push out and how to pull up/back. I know it is only a matter of time before I "get it". I wish I had more time to work on it daily like you can. I also wish I had east access to a pump track. That experience might inform me of some of the physics involved.
    The thing I am having to work on MOST is braking. I want to really learn the controls of using my brake to control if I am going to fall over. Sure, leaning forward is easy...but braking is quicker. Everyone says to bend your knees, but I find having mine straight help me more, but it seems to depend on my speed?

  18. #18
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    OK, as i am proggresing i i have another question.

    When i lean backwords i feel like there is a certain point where the bike want to raise the nose a bit, is this the point where i should pull on the handelbar to get the wanted lift?

  19. #19
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    I felt like i must share this

    one of the best videos ever to learn manual (the pulling part is very important)


    More
    Mountain Biking Videos

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbullet
    I felt like i must share this

    one of the best videos ever to learn manual (the pulling part is very important)
    Excellent offering! I never would have thought of intentionally overthrowing the manual to find the balance point and then reducing the throw to find the balance. Hopefully I can carve out some free time to give that a shot.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayenn
    Excellent offering! I never would have thought of intentionally overthrowing the manual to find the balance point and then reducing the throw to find the balance. Hopefully I can carve out some free time to give that a shot.
    Yeah , and it also helps to pvercome the fear of looping out

  22. #22
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    im just building on what thunder bullet said, like he said over come the fear of looping out, best way to do that is to get over that fear on grass so its a softer landing, but practice your manuals on concrete because they're much easier on a smooth terrain, its how i learned em and don't give up, it take quite a while to learn them.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazdxb
    im just building on what thunder bullet said, like he said over come the fear of looping out, best way to do that is to get over that fear on grass so its a softer landing, but practice your manuals on concrete because they're much easier on a smooth terrain, its how i learned em and don't give up, it take quite a while to learn them.
    yes thats right, and even when my bikes reached thier limit i instinctly jumped away from them so no harm was done to my back or ass.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbullet
    Quote Originally Posted by hazdxb
    im just building on what thunder bullet said, like he said over come the fear of looping out, best way to do that is to get over that fear on grass so its a softer landing, but practice your manuals on concrete because they're much easier on a smooth terrain, its how i learned em and don't give up, it take quite a while to learn them.
    yes thats right, and even when my bikes reached thier limit i instinctly jumped away from them so no harm was done to my back or ass.
    I had planed on finding a nice stretch of level grass this weekend. I'll get over the concern of looping out soon enough. It is this whole "being a responsible husband" thing I didn't have 20 years ago. I tell ya, between the time that has passed and the 26" instead of a 20" it's like learning this stuff all over again. Oh how I miss that sense of invincibility!

  25. #25
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    Just keep one finger on the end of the brake lever and tap your brakes if you start to loop out and you won't loop out. . . .

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