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  1. #26
    Curb Jumper
    Reputation: [dB]Will's Avatar
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    I've been sort of practicing manuals on my daily ride and actually held a nice little one today. It felt real nice but I got excited and when I went to do the next one I didn't have my finger on the brake and almost looped out. I caught it just in time but went off into someones yard. Man, I'm starting to get excited. Throughout my years of BMXing (~10) and MTB (~5) I have never been able to manual. It's a cool feeling.

  2. #27
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    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayenn
    . . .I wish I had more time to work on it daily like you can. I also wish I had east access to a pump track. That experience might inform me of some of the physics involved.
    you are correct that daily riding is the key. i never fully learned them till college when i was riding to class every day on the same street manualing the same sidewalk, curbs etc. manualing is one of those things that requires you to be very in tune with your bike. even sometimes if i'm not riding for a while i have to work on them a little to get them back. riding every day and practicing them on a commute, i guarantee you will learn them waaaay faster than just the occasional weeknight or weekend session.

    as for the 'pump track' . . . . flat ground manualing is a slightly different skill than manualing between rollers. some people can manual rollers but cant flat-ground manual good. anyway . . .there are things on regular city streets that are awesome to manual. thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act, wheelchair-ramps and wheel-chair ramp cutouts from curbs at intersections are awesome.

    try using the up-bank to pull up into the manual. but even more important try riding up it then manualing down the backside and across the flat. if you can manual up, across, down, and flat . . then you're on your way to manualing multiple rollers at a pump track.






    even something like this, a bank to flat to bank. . . . .



    try manual both up it and down it. . . . you have to adjust for the flat space, kind of a double pump. when you pull up into the manual then hit the incline your front wants to drop, lean back harder, then when you hit the flat spot your bike wants to loop out, so drop your bars lower, then hit the incline again and adjust your weight back again.

  3. #28
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    That was actually interesting and helpful info!

    I actually commute on my DJ and have started messing around on the sidewalk structures you describe when I can. Sadly, due to more than 20 years of street designing to combat skateboarders the place I live is startlingly flat.

    A bit over 2 decades ago I was shedding around here pretty much anywhere I went. I then moved away for a while. In that time the cities I live in went on a rampage in rebuilding almost every place that had shredable features to be less attractive to skaters. The result is two poorly planed skateparks and flat flat flat.

    There are sections of old sidewalk here and there that have settled in some interesting ways I go on my way to work every day.

  4. #29
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    If anyone is intersted, after a mounth of training i was managed to pick up a decent manual...

    here have a look:

  5. #30
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    Reputation: [dB]Will's Avatar
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    The vid isn't working sir

    I've been staying on the practice but I just can't quite hold one for more than 5 seconds or so. MY Komodo has a pretty slack HA and I almost think that helps. I tried to manual a bit on my gals Cannondale F7 Fem as it is a bit smaller than my bike, but it seems like her steep HA makes the front end a lot harder to pull up. Does that make ay sense? I've been riding around with her trying to get her prepped for trail riding but she was having problems pulling up the front wheel to get onto curbs and stuff. I thought it was just her but I now think the problem lies in the geometry of the bike...

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by [dB]Will
    The vid isn't working sir

    I've been staying on the practice but I just can't quite hold one for more than 5 seconds or so. MY Komodo has a pretty slack HA and I almost think that helps. I tried to manual a bit on my gals Cannondale F7 Fem as it is a bit smaller than my bike, but it seems like her steep HA makes the front end a lot harder to pull up. Does that make ay sense? I've been riding around with her trying to get her prepped for trail riding but she was having problems pulling up the front wheel to get onto curbs and stuff. I thought it was just her but I now think the problem lies in the geometry of the bike...
    Actually the thing that helped me the most is visualising i am going into a drop:
    Streching out my legs while rolling the bike forward and extending my arms to the point where i cant anymore...and then keep rolling on the sweet spot is the 2nd objective.

  7. #32
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    when i learned how i just watched peeps at the skate park and tried it myself. i found if you just get use to flippin it then you start to get a feel for the sweet spot on your bike. keep tryin to hold it at lower heights until your able to keep your manual goin for like ten feet or so. also different speeds. my friend brandon R.I.P. could manual at full speed better than any other speed so you might wanna try that to
    would anyone like to buy partially plucked chickens?

  8. #33
    Transition Blindside v5
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderbullet
    for example in this video the guy doesnt pull the handelbar at all he is just leanning backwords...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oE2o5...eature=related
    Mmmmm, personally I really like this kid's manual style, with the front wheel kept pretty low...
    (I just wish I could understand what he's saying, though, hahaha...)
    Last edited by PiroChu; 10-27-2010 at 05:50 PM.
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  9. #34
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    Looping out over and over really does help you get a feel for the balance point. It also helps you get rid of that "Oh my god I'm going to die!" feeling you get when you are falling backwards.

  10. #35
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    bump

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