Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,419

    Manuals: standing up or laying back?

    I know that the technique for doing manuals has been covered thousands of times, but this is a different question.
    My question is: is it better to to standing up or "laying back" manuals? I ask this because I see people use both of them. Tell me if I'm right here: are standing up manuals for getting over obstacles (eg. 4X) and laying back manuals to show off?
    Personally, I have more problems doing laying back manuals. When I try to do one, I usually fall on my ass or end up standing up during the manual. What am I doing wrong?
    Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  2. #2
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,448
    You mean a seated manual? That's more for no footer manuals.. Use your feet(move them forward and back) the same as you would use your butt on a standing manual.

  3. #3
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,709
    I think he is referring to how far you get your a$$ back... really hanging off the rear, or pulling the bike up higher and doing them more upright... is that right?

    I would imagine its easier to pump a bump or transition if you aren't waaay back, but I don't know?

    JMH

    Quote Originally Posted by snaky69
    You mean a seated manual? That's more for no footer manuals.. Use your feet(move them forward and back) the same as you would use your butt on a standing manual.

  4. #4
    mtbr remember
    Reputation: BikeSATORI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    4,257
    either is the correct answer! you do whatever your balance tells you to do to keep up the front wheel and keep the back weighted on changing ground. you will pump, moving from far back to standing repeatedly going over rollers or just for speed.
    but, generally, on flat ground, laid back low and far over the rear wheel, you will get more distance since it's easier to hold your balance point in that position for a long time with a lower center of gravity (not that manuals are easy to begin with), and you can use your feet on the pedals to move the rear tire forward and back as needed....

    if you keep falling on your a$$ when laid back, then just lower the front tire a bit more to readjust your balance point. if you can go farther in a vertical stand up manual, then I applaud you, cuz in my opinion, I find that hard!

    oh yeah, 545cu4ch, what is with the sudden popularity of domo-kun? in your avatar? I don't really understand it, haha he is funny looking though...
    Last edited by BikeSATORI; 09-07-2006 at 07:19 PM.
    Schralp it Heavy.

  5. #5
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeSATORI
    either is the correct answer! you do whatever your balance tells you to do to keep up the front wheel and keep the back weighted on changing ground. you will pump, moving from far back to standing repeatedly going over rollers or just for speed.
    but, generally, on flat ground, laid back low and far over the rear wheel, you will get more distance since it's easier to hold your balance point in that position for a long time with a lower center of gravity (not that manuals are easy to begin with), and you can use your feet on the pedals to move the rear tire forward and back as needed....

    if you keep falling on your a$$ when laid back, then just lower the front tire a bit more to readjust your balance point. if you can go farther in a vertical stand up manual, then I applaud you, cuz in my opinion, I find that hard!

    oh yeah, 545cu4ch, what is with the sudden popularity of domo-kun? in your avatar? I don't really understand it, haha he is funny looking though...
    Well, I find it easier to do a vertical stand up manual, though I suck at it anyways The bad thing about it is that when I fall on my ass doing one of those, it hurts more Ive tried to do the pumping stuff with the feet, but I dont seem to get it right. I guess I just have to practice more. When I see guys doing the pumping thing, they look like their trying to hump their stem, but its too far
    Thanks for clearing my doubt.

    About domo kun, well yeah, I found about him before he entered the mainstream
    I just find him funny too, he looks like a carpet.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  6. #6
    Premium Member
    Reputation: Ojai Bicyclist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,843
    Getcho ass back when you manual unless you want to look like a dufus and have no controll.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: free rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,393
    i dont know about you, but i cant manual laying back...i thought there was seated and standing

    whats this sport comign too

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TXhucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    254
    For me, it depends on the terrain or how I'm starting the manual. This also relates to the other thread about standing or sitting wheelies. When I manual from flat ground or land in a manual, I'm in the laid back position and I'm not good at it at all. When manualing over rollers or something that kicks the front wheel up naturally, I am straight up, boner style. Manualing rollers or the rythym section at a bmx track...I can do it really well and hold it for a good distance. I feel like I have much more control. But that's how I learned so I'm more comfortable with that.

    Wheelies: I cannot do them sitting down. I can ride a nice long one standing up.

  9. #9
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by TXhucker
    For me, it depends on the terrain or how I'm starting the manual. This also relates to the other thread about standing or sitting wheelies. When I manual from flat ground or land in a manual, I'm in the laid back position and I'm not good at it at all. When manualing over rollers or something that kicks the front wheel up naturally, I am straight up, boner style. Manualing rollers or the rythym section at a bmx track...I can do it really well and hold it for a good distance. I feel like I have much more control. But that's how I learned so I'm more comfortable with that.

    Wheelies: I cannot do them sitting down. I can ride a nice long one standing up.
    Thanks a lot for clearing it up. Thats excactly answers my question
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  10. #10
    me like bikes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,094
    personally, i can't do very good manuals sitting. i can ride them standing up, but for siting i always find my self pedaling them up and then i end up pedaling to keep it up after a few seconds of doing the manual. for sitting down, i find it easist for me to actually do it when i have my seat up higher for XC. i just put it on the balance point and ride it. use the rear break to keep it from going over and slight movement of the pedals to keep her up. wish i could actually be of help to ya
    "dropped outta school. no G.E.D. but in these streets i'm a G.O.D."
    -murs

  11. #11
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,448
    I'm usually all over the place, whatever the bike need to stay up, I give it to her.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zaefod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    291
    I wish I could get there. As soon as I feel it start to slip back I panic and grab the brake.

  13. #13
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,448
    Instead of grabbing it, feather it, and if you feel you're really falling back a lot, push your weight forward and grab the brake(don't lock the wheel).

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zaefod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    291
    I've never been able to "feather" the brake in a one-wheel situation. Always seems to be too much bite no matter what. I'll be keeping at it though.

  15. #15
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,419
    Quote Originally Posted by zaefod
    I've never been able to "feather" the brake in a one-wheel situation. Always seems to be too much bite no matter what. I'll be keeping at it though.
    Hahah me too. Maybe its my no-modulation brakes
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  16. #16
    me like bikes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,094
    yeah, for riding really long wheeiles and manuals i'm constantly riding the break it seems like. just gotta get the pull on the levers so it feels comfortable to just barely pull them and get some break action, but you don't want to have it so you pull it and they just grab all the way. play around with your breaks, because they are very helpful on the rear wheel.
    "dropped outta school. no G.E.D. but in these streets i'm a G.O.D."
    -murs

  17. #17
    rock hard or hardrock
    Reputation: derfernerf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,047
    watch this there are 2 or 3 good manuals within the first 1:00

    http://broadbandsports.com/node/3321
    www.transitionbikes.com

    "The journey of 1,000 miles begins with one step" -Bear Grylls

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •