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  1. #1
    destructionismyobjective
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    Manuals--how to??

    Ive been struggling to do a manual, whats the trick. I can trackstand and pivot or hop up and down objects but i cant stand on the back wheel or do a rolling manual, any tips?

  2. #2
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    I'm with you, I can't do them either, I did one once I landed into one off of a jump. So what is a track stand?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitterrider
    Ive been struggling to do a manual, whats the trick. I can trackstand and pivot or hop up and down objects but i cant stand on the back wheel or do a rolling manual, any tips?
    if u have gears put it on the lowes one leanback and peddal wile pulling up the front. its helpful if you adjust the seat up more and look wer ur goin.

  4. #4
    Air Junkie
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    Shift your weight to the back and pull up on the bars, try to almost straighten your legs and arms and stick your butt over or past the rear wheel, your supposed to use the counterbalance of the front of the bike to keep you level.

    Pedaling is not allowed in manualing.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudden_Judgement
    Shift your weight to the back and pull up on the bars, try to almost straighten your legs and arms and stick your butt over or past the rear wheel, your supposed to use the counterbalance of the front of the bike to keep you level.

    Pedaling is not allowed in manualing.

    if u cant pedall thewn how u spose to keep it goin

  6. #6
    Jesus Freak
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    You "pump" to keep it going. Pedaling on the back wheel is just a run of the mill wheelie and does not count for a manual.

    Pull on the bars slightly and lean your butt over the rear axel. Keep your arms only very slightly bent.

    If you start to roll out bend your knees. If your front wheel starts to drop straighten your knees.

    Some speed is necessary but you don't have to be flying. Oh, and it takes time. Practice, practice, practice and then practice some more.

  7. #7
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    a perfect manual does not involve arms. They have to stay straight and relaxed. Put your body back and low, bend your knees, look way forward (don't look at your front wheel) your abdominal muscles should get very tight and push on your legs. The front wheel goes up with the pressure of the legs on the pedals.

    And train again and again. Mastering manualing needs lot of time

  8. #8
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    does it help to have a more dirt jump style bike than an XC bike?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tilla0
    does it help to have a more dirt jump style bike than an XC bike?

    Usually because they tend to have shorter chainstays as well as shorter stems so it makes it a bit easier to get the front wheel up.

  10. #10
    Me hates pinchflat
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    I cant do them properly either
    When I do a decent one, its usually by accident. Last time I tried one, I was manualing a 2 foot "bump". I summersaulted and landed on my back
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by d-boy000
    if u have gears put it on the lowes one leanback and peddal wile pulling up the front. its helpful if you adjust the seat up more and look wer ur goin.
    If you're really trying to get the technique down, don't pedal. Pedalling to get the front up is just a crutch and won't help you. Lean back and down, get your ass way back behind the saddle and as low as you can. Your arms should be just about extended. If you do this right the front should sort of "float up" by itself. You shouldn't need to put much effort into throwing your weight back unless you have a bike with long chainstays and/or a longish stem. If you have a bike like that no problem, just do the same thing with a bit more emphasis.

    I can't really do them worth a damn but I can get the front up fine...it's the balancing that is the hard part . Just practice a lot. And I do mean a lot. It's frustrating but every now and then you'll just randomly pull one for 15-20 feet and feel really proud of yourself after being able to get nothing previously. Some of the guys I ride with have been practicing them for a year and can do them pretty well, but not forever. I'm sure you can get it down in a few months if you practice hard enough. Good luck!

  12. #12
    Manual4ever
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    Do it all the time, everywhere you go...practice! It sucks that there isn't an 'easy trick' to getting em down. Just keep doing it and doing it!
    Everyday it takes me a few tries to get the balance point again.
    It takes time to get the brain/muscle connection to work right.

  13. #13
    I post too much.
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    Try using the rear brake if you're falling back too much :P

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Moore
    You "pump" to keep it going. Pedaling on the back wheel is just a run of the mill wheelie and does not count for a manual.

    Pull on the bars slightly and lean your butt over the rear axel. Keep your arms only very slightly bent.

    If you start to roll out bend your knees. If your front wheel starts to drop straighten your knees.

    Some speed is necessary but you don't have to be flying. Oh, and it takes time. Practice, practice, practice and then practice some more.
    so the manual ur tlaking about only works goin downhills.

  15. #15
    Rollin' twenties.
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    Quote Originally Posted by d-boy000
    so the manual ur tlaking about only works goin downhills.
    no you can manuel uphill if you really wanted to, ya it mite be a little easier going downhill but that aint the only way. and as far as keeping speed goes, just make sure your already going fast enough to clear the distance you want to clear. it helps me to go pretty fast

  16. #16
    Biker for Life
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    yeah i have been trying manuals for a really long time now. i have been doing them completely wrong. but also does anyone know how to pogo. i can get my front wheel up to my balance point but i cant kep it up and i cant jump while i have my front in the air.
    afk irl

  17. #17
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    Lots of good shots of Hamilton doing manuals about 45 seconds into the video below. I just wonder how many times he flips backwards and they just edit those out. This guy makes them look effortless nonetheless...


  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by konaclump91
    yeah i have been trying manuals for a really long time now. i have been doing them completely wrong. but also does anyone know how to pogo. i can get my front wheel up to my balance point but i cant kep it up and i cant jump while i have my front in the air.

    Don't try to jump from a manual if you don't really have the manual down. If you're just talking about doing bunnyhops then someone else could explain that better than me. If you find yourself always falling forward, try this: While you're riding the bike pull the front wheel up with a little extra "oomph" so that you have to jump off the back of the bike. Do this several times to get more of a feel for where the "point of no return is." Once you have a good feel for that try the same but then touch the rear brakes to bring you back forward. I emphasize the word "touch" because if you panic and grab them you will slam the front down and it won't be fun. This should just give you a better idea of where your balance point is. It works for me mostly.

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=GotMojo?]Lots of good shots of Hamilton doing manuals about 45 seconds into the video below. I just wonder how many times he flips backwards and they just edit those out. This guy makes them look effortless nonetheless...

    No doubt the guy is talented, but I can't wait for him to bust his head open and maybe start wearing a helmet for once. I wouldn't even care, but guys like this are part of the reason so many people think it's cool to not wear helmets.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sovietspyguy
    Quote Originally Posted by GotMojo?
    Lots of good shots of Hamilton doing manuals about 45 seconds into the video below. I just wonder how many times he flips backwards and they just edit those out. This guy makes them look effortless nonetheless...
    No doubt the guy is talented, but I can't wait for him to bust his head open and maybe start wearing a helmet for once. I wouldn't even care, but guys like this are part of the reason so many people think it's cool to not wear helmets.
    Yup, never understood why most of these really talented guys would risk throwing it all away by not wearing any type of protection. All it takes is one bad crash for it to be all over. That pavement looks pretty damn hard.

  21. #21
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    While I am not very good at manuals, I have found a few things that help me out. First off, before you pull back, make sure and pre-load your fork (assuming you're not riding rigid). When you pre-load (push down on the handlebars) it makes it to where you don't have to jerk the bike back as hard, making it a more fluid motion. Then drop your arse and bend your knees a little once you are up and push in and out with your legs to balance. Keeping your elbows outward will also help your side to side balance.
    To get a feel of how far you need to pull up, ride up to a park bench or something similar, and pull up you front wheel onto the bench then stop. Then try and imitate the same motion while rolling around. Sometimes when i'm having trouble getting the feel, i'll do this and it seems to help. Just my 2cents. Have fun, and wear a skull cap.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by FalconAR
    While I am not very good at manuals, I have found a few things that help me out. First off, before you pull back, make sure and pre-load your fork (assuming you're not riding rigid). When you pre-load (push down on the handlebars) it makes it to where you don't have to jerk the bike back as hard, making it a more fluid motion. Then drop your arse and bend your knees a little once you are up and push in and out with your legs to balance. Keeping your elbows outward will also help your side to side balance.
    To get a feel of how far you need to pull up, ride up to a park bench or something similar, and pull up you front wheel onto the bench then stop. Then try and imitate the same motion while rolling around. Sometimes when i'm having trouble getting the feel, i'll do this and it seems to help. Just my 2cents. Have fun, and wear a skull cap.
    I kinda disagree with the preload. Unless you have a bike with more slack geo. (long stem/chainstays) you should just kind of lean back and down a lot, get your ass way over the back wheel if you have to, and the front should kind of "lift up" almost on its own without too much help from you. If you DO have a long bike then yeah, preloading helps and you might really need to throw your weight back.

  23. #23
    I post too much.
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    I lean back down and lower, give it a tiny bit of help with my wrists and then roll in style. If you have good hubs and don't touch the brake too much, you can go for a very long time :P

  24. #24
    Biker for Life
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    i just was trying on picnic tables today, then when i left to head back to my house i was picturing a picnic table in front of me and it helps me alot...i can kinda keep them at my balance point, still a little low.
    afk irl

  25. #25
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    Whenever i ride it takes me about 30 minutes to start getting my balance point down. I can ride manuals for about 200 feet or so now. One trick i like do is before you try to manual starting flat, ride a few wheelies and coast them into a manual to find the balance point, once you've got your balance point established you can start manuling out pretty long. Next start from flat and pull up your manuals, then you'll know where you need to be when you get to the balance point.

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