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  1. #1
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    DJ , Pump Track plans

    My freinds and I are going to build a DJ park and a Pump track. I have been doing a lot of research trying to find the best set I can find. So does anyone have and good suggestions of webpages or any links that could help me out. I did get the e-book from leelikesbikes.com.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flboy
    My freinds and I are going to build a DJ park and a Pump track. I have been doing a lot of research trying to find the best set I can find. So does anyone have and good suggestions of webpages or any links that could help me out. I did get the e-book from leelikesbikes.com.

    Thanks
    I think the best advise I could give you is to get a solid commitment from your friends that you all will put in the hours to dig. When you start a line, really plan it out and put some thought and measurments into it. Digging w/ a crew is always much easier. 5-6 people can really make something from a pile of dirt.
    -ebR

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by East Bay Rich
    I think the best advise I could give you is to get a solid commitment from your friends that you all will put in the hours to dig. When you start a line, really plan it out and put some thought and measurments into it. Digging w/ a crew is always much easier. 5-6 people can really make something from a pile of dirt.
    -ebR
    true that
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  4. #4
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    Good advice so far. And don't underestimate the amount of time and effort you need to put in even after your done building. My pump track has required a lot of maintenance just to keep it rideable. And I seem to always want to build some new lines once I get bored with it.

    So I guess what I'm saying is, you really are never finished building a pump track.

  5. #5
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    the Leelikesbikes "Welcome to Pump Track Nation" is written well, BUT . . the thing people don't realize is that it is primarily intended for backyards. if you have a lot of space, like a public park, do not build a small 30 ft. X 70ft. oval or figure 8 pump track. that is not what mtb/bmx is all about !! that's a backyard pump track.


    SO, lemme just give you some points that I think are essential to a good mtbmx spot.

    1. if you are on flat ground, you MUST build a large starting hill, like at a bmx track. there is nothing as lame as having to crank from a standstill.

    2. build at least 3 different jump lines with different heights and gaps. the standard bmx skatepark box jump in the old days was 4' tall with an 8' or 10' deck. that is an excellent size for a lot of riding levels. the difficulty has more to do with the mellowness or steepness of the transitions than with the size. for example, in the picture below, is 3 tabletops in a row. the height is probably somewhere between 3'6" on the first one and maybe 4'5" on the last one. the lip to landing gaps should match up pretty closely, unless you're going down hill. you don't want a short jump followed by a long one, or the reverse.
    a 7-8 foot lip to landing gap is very easy. 9-10 is normal/intermediate. 11-12 is getting big (unless your transitions are mellow and it's easy to carry some distance. 13+ is intermediate/advanced level. for that to be fun, you MUST be on a decline slope, or have a BIG starting hill to drop in from.


    3. space your rollers appropriately.
    the rollers you see in the picture below on the left are spaced 13-14 ft. peak to peak. this is typical bmx race track style. you can gain speed, manual through them etc.



    4. TABLES are good for beginner and intermediate scenes. if you want more people to show up (and potentially help in the future), build stuff they can ride. this table about 13 or 14 feet from lip to landing. note how deck of table transitions with a curve into the landing. this is good for beginners who are gonna tag their back wheel pretty hard.



    5. public city/neighborhood spots should not be built by hand. if the city ok's a dirt jump spot, get someone to rent a bobcat and do all the fundamental work with heavy machinery. most beginner jump spots die before they get started because of the sheer amount of digging it takes to make an awesome spot.

    6. resist the urge to make every jump look like a skatepark quarterpipe--one line of steep tranny jumps is cool, but build the others with mellow. you will get plenty of air and it will be a lot smoother.


    7. avoid the mistake of small landings. landings are actually more important than launches. you want something that is big and long, starts steep at the top, but has mellow transition at the bottom. here is a typical beginner mistake. a 13' gap but the landing has barely enough surface to get the wheelbase of your bike on.


    this is one of the big sets. around 18 feet lip to landing lip gap. but look how big the landing is. tons of transition to land on. . the more transition you have to land on, no matter how big the jump, the more the jumps will have flow. flat ground is your enemy. rythm comes from having back to back transitions. inclines, declines, curves.

    hope that helps.

  6. #6
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    great pic's and advidce cmc4130 and as far as commitment goes we have got it. This going to be on private property and the land owner came to us to build the park, well it was a mutual coming together. He wants a track and we want a track. We already have the use of bobcats and other heavy equipment. I am trying to find some guidence into build the jumps properly and suggestions of good flow lines. Thanks agin for the great advice on spacing and landings. I know there are a bunch of us MTB's who have done this and know some things to do and not to do.

  7. #7
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    Here are some plans:

    http://www.chuckfurlong.com/SundaysTrails/design.html

    These are out of date. The place is no longer called Sundays trails, and the jumps didn't end up being built exactly as you see in the plans.

    Also check out Progressive Park Design's plans for the Texas X-Park dirt section:
    http://www.progressiveparkdesign.com..._Park_Dirt.pdf .


    1. RHYTHM SPACING. If you're going to do a rhythm line of jumps (meaning back to back jumps where you have to land smooth to have a good pump to jump the next one), spacing is very important.
    The top of the first landing to the lip of the next jump needs to be somewhere between double and triple the gap distance of the jumps. So, if you have a line of 10 foot gap jumps, the landing-to-next-lip distance should be at least 20 ft. That will feel tight. 25ft. is about normal. And 30ft. is plenty of room. These tables are spaced around 25-28 feet. If you do the math, this will also tell you how much room you'll need for a 5 sets of doubles in a row. Big drop in (probably covers 15 feet of the flat ground), at least 30 feet to crank, 10 foot gap, 25 ft pit, 10 ft. gap, 25 ft pit, 10, 25, 10, 25, 10, 25, then some kind of berm to turn around (covering another 15 ft or so). So add it up, that means you need roughly 220 - 250 ft. 80 yards.


    2. CONSTRUCTION.
    (a) If you have to dig dirt by hand, consider using large objects like solid stacks of logs, railroad ties, bricks/cinder blocks, washing machines, whatever. It will go so much faster, and you'll have a solid under-structure. If you're using logs, the base of the jump has to be a lot wider than you want it at the top, because dirt has a tendency to become mountain shaped....
    (b) If you're buying dirt, you can use cheap fill dirt for most of the jump, ESPECIALLY if you're building tables, then put a layer of sandy loam with clay content, or some other kind of clay mixture. In my area, the natural black clay soil is perfect by itself. If you pack it really well, when it dries, it's like cement.

    (c) Watering the jumps will prevent the surface cracking and crumbling. So you need to think about where you'll get your water.


  8. #8
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    I nominate this thread for sticky status!

    Fantastic info.

    who can make it happen?

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    awesome write ups there cmc4130 good info. I agree with the stickage

  10. #10
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    A few words about pump tracks, pump-jump tracks, and mid-school bmx rhythm sections.....

    1. To take a pump track to the next level, you'll want to move beyond the Leelikesbikes.com designs and build something that looks a lot more like a mini-bmx track. Back to back table tops, lots of rollable doubles, launch-transfers etc.

    2. Take a look at this classic 1990's SoCal BMX spot known as Sheep Hills. Watch the very first line. What you'll notice is how the lips are not more than 3 feet off ground level, but the pits are at least 2 feet or more deep--meaning they feel more like 5 foot tall doubles. The cool thing about having landing pits that are bowls with zero flat space is that it makes your rhythm section really smooth. (The bad thing is if you live in a rainy climate, they fill up with water). You can have back to back doubles very close together, but because of the constant transitions you get amazing flow. ** SO, consider using the same concept in your pump track.

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...A5DQ4ALUg5HnBA


    3. Here's another example of back to back low-to-the-ground doubles with deep pits. It was known as the Graveyard section at 9th street.

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...LRoLnsBA&hl=en

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...MJSw4QKt2eXxBA

  11. #11
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    bump

  12. #12
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    I CALL STICKY!

    nice post
    -War does not determine who is right, only who is left...-

    current bike: Brodie Brat 08

  13. #13
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    This is a good reference point for ideas.
    Just posting so I can find this for easy reference.

  14. #14
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    why the **** is there nothing like that where i live

  15. #15
    What's the Speed of Dark?
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    Stuff like this just doesn't magically appear...
    It takes hard work and dedication.

    Obviously everyone where you live is fat and lazy.
    Tricks Like: The Heavy Metal Maniac's Dizz Flip, Redefine the Term "Radness"

  16. #16
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    I was just about to say, Get out there and make something like it. That's what I'm doing.

    All you need is a shovel, dirt, and a tamper. Oh and a lot of manpower helps.

  17. #17
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    is what cmc4130 posted a jump pump track compared to rhythm pump track?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjcc55
    is what cmc4130 posted a jump pump track compared to rhythm pump track?
    yes.

    rhythm pump tracks in my opinion get boring. if it's not designed to have jumpable aspects to it, it is almost pointless.

    the way you space rollers and pits matters A LOT to whether it's a jump-pump track or pump only.

  19. #19
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    Walk thru the progression of this thread: Joe's Jump Farm

  20. #20
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    this spot is the perfect example of jump/pump. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4U1LvX6zJjM

    bmx'ers would just say it's trails and everything is rollable.

    the rollable factor is key for bringing new people into the scene. old guys, chicks, groms etc. (if thats what you want).

  21. #21
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    CMC, I really like the looks of your track in Austin, and also the last post about the jump/pump track. I have the pump track nation book and I am in the planning stage for building a jump/pump track. Do you have a layout for the austin track? It looks like some of it is sloping down hill. My lot has a large flat upper section and then drops down in three different tiers. My plan was to build the track on the upper portion but after looking at some of these threads I am considering some alternate lines that drop down into the lower tiers. I see how you can use the progressively bigger rollers to go up hill, but how steep of an incline can you climb back up with pumping only?

  22. #22
    Manual4ever
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    out of curiosity, and since i'll be ordering my dirt and hauling it in. How many yards of dirt is that table jump?
    06 Giant STP
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr boo boo
    CMC, I really like the looks of your track in Austin, and also the last post about the jump/pump track. I have the pump track nation book and I am in the planning stage for building a jump/pump track. Do you have a layout for the austin track? It looks like some of it is sloping down hill. My lot has a large flat upper section and then drops down in three different tiers. My plan was to build the track on the upper portion but after looking at some of these threads I am considering some alternate lines that drop down into the lower tiers. I see how you can use the progressively bigger rollers to go up hill, but how steep of an incline can you climb back up with pumping only?
    heh hheh. those weren't "my" track. but this is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZ3E8u-CZ2w
    there's no question, if YOU build it, they will come.

    to answer your question, you should definitely use natural terrain ups and downs. it's more challenging, but in the end it is way more fun.

    for going up a slight incline or gaining speed from a slow speed consider an accelerating rollers design:


    another thing i learned was that you want a big radius to turn 90 degrees at the bottom of a decline, but then a tight radius turn as you turn to go back up an incline. nothing kills speed like a big radius berm that goes up hill.

    if you want to make rollers more jumpable, pair up the rollers, instead of spacing them evenly. pace out all your peaks. if you're not digging down bowls/pits, you'll need a lot more dirt. remember these are not speedbumps, you're creating a wave pattern on the ground--no flat space !! always make rollers bubbled over, not peaky.









    more here:

    "pump tracks" thread on ridemonkey http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=217062

  24. #24
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    I would like to point out one thing that has been kinda overlooked. after building one obstacle, ride it to get an idea how much speed you'll have and where you want to start building the next. after building the next, ride both to see if they flow correctly. if they do you will not have to pedal, brake(check-up) or struggle to make the second set, it should come naturally. thirdly, it is nice to see a slight increase in speed after landing each set. dont make the mistake of getting in a hurry and throwing up a bunch of jumps and then having to move all of them to make it work. also have patience, I know guys that will spend a week building a lip, another week or more on the lander and then after riding it they end up tearing it down and moving it to make the flow better.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime8
    out of curiosity, and since i'll be ordering my dirt and hauling it in. How many yards of dirt is that table jump?
    just do the math... length X width X height = volume

    1 cubic yard is 27 cubic feet.

    account for dirt being packed versus loose.

    the box area in the middle (the deck) would be 12 feet long, average of 5 wide (4 wide at the top, 6 wide at the bottom), and 4 feet tall. then add on a rough 8 X 5 X 4 for the launch and landing part. 14 cubic yards. multiply by 1.3 to account for loose versus packed...
    total = ROUGHLY 18 cubic yards. which is a LOT. a whole dump truck load.

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