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  1. #101
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    Here are some pics of a jump park called The Lair in Bend, Oregon. We just finished our spring build sessions. We had 39 people show up to a weekend build day!!!

    Lower section of jump lines.
















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  2. #102
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    Nice!
    Transition Bank
    Transition ToP
    Transition Covert

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by NastyNick
    Here are some pics of a jump park called The Lair in Bend, Oregon. We just finished our spring build sessions. We had 39 people show up to a weekend build day!!!
    A lot of great-looking stuff there!! Maybe you could elaborate a little (as far as this being the DJ, Pump Track "plans") thread . . . with some of the measurements, spacing, techniques etc. used ?

    Do yall have a water source to water the jumps? Is that all native soil (if so, it looks surprisingly good)....

    I like how yall made landings a little stepped-up and big and wide--that will definitely help the durability.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flboy
    My freinds and I are going to build a DJ park and a Pump track. I have been doing a lot of research trying to find the best set I can find. So does anyone have and good suggestions of webpages or any links that could help me out. I did get the e-book from leelikesbikes.com.

    Thanks
    This ist the gayest thing Ive ever read. You need an instruction manual to dig and pack dirt.


    If it (roller, berm, whatever) sucks dig it up and move it.
    ORP

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzy
    This ist the gayest thing Ive ever read. You need an instruction manual to dig and pack dirt.


    If it (roller, berm, whatever) sucks dig it up and move it.


    Sure, for someone who has already ridden different spots and knows the basic designs already, then a little trial and error is fine (and usually necessary). But, this whole thread is designed to assist beginners and people who want to try to get it better the first time.

    There have been so many times I have seen things built not right, get torn down and re-built not quite right again, then get abandoned. And I also have met quite a few experienced, rad riders, who can't design and build trails for sht. And I also know guys who are not great riders, but who are great designers/builders. Most people don't see what goes in to good design. Bystanders just see piles of dirt, while many riders don't think, just ride. A lot of times, a setup will work okay, but a different design could improve it immensely.

    Maybe I pay a lot of attention to measurements etc. because I've built a lot of ramps--from backyard half-pipes to private and public bike/skateparks... There's something to be said with looking at plans and doing stuff right.

    Here are some guys designing and building professionally:
    Inside Earth Ramp Dirt Park Construction
    http://espn.go.com/action/bmx/blog/_/post/5364197

    Last edited by cmc4130; 05-11-2011 at 07:07 PM.

  6. #106
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    New city-sponsored jumps
    Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee, Fl.

    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=242376

    this is a good example of how to improve a typical tabletop. ---> make it a step up, where the landing is taller than the launch. the reason step ups are so common in dirt jumping is that a bigger landing has more space for the wheelbase of your bike to land.

    note especially, the curved over landing-edge. much smoother than a hard-corner landing edge.




    here's are two other examples of the rolled-over or curved landing edge on a step up . .. this time at wood bikeparks:


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    although some builders do build the sides and back of a jump almost vertically (see second pic below), it is more typical (and durable) to have your jumps somewhat Pyramid shaped. and if they're slanted, this means the base of your jump is going to be a lot wider than at the top, or the lip. this means that the base (or "footprint") of the launch is going to be like a big rectangle on the ground. you mark that out to start with and build the entire base and pack it down. then you add the next layer, pack it. then the next layer etc. like Aztecs or Egyptians building pyramids. this also makes for easier packing because it's a lot easier to pack downwards than to pack sideways later (trying to make a jump wider).



    Pyramid shaped jumps. very sturdy/durable:

    from
    Oregon Trails
    http://www.ridemonkey.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=233036

    Vertical sides & back. No question it looks rad, but it will be less durable. Especially if you're not using premium clay. Places that have amazing clay like in this picture are better able to stack and pack vertically.


    If you're doing the pit/bowl method of building (where you get the dirt from the riding line) you'll notice that a lot of the "base" of the lip is part of the natural earth already there . . . . this is the most efficient way of building.



    You can also find a natural decline and build a landing extension at the top of it, like this:


  8. #108
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    another example of the "pyramid" sides to launches and landings . . . . brought to you by the All-Star digger crew for Odyssey's Texas Toast jam which is happening this weekend in Austin:


  9. #109
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    Well I've got dirt coming this weekend. I'm getting 6 dump truck loads which is 72 yards and renting a skid steer. I'll take pictures and keep you guys posted.

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    I guess this hasn't come up so far . . . . but it's worth mentioning that pump track style features can be made of lumber. Either in the freeride-ish planky style or in the smooth-plywood bmx park style.

    Ray's MTB has one of the best known:



    Here's an outdoor one (with the 2X6 planky style). . . at the Burnaby skills park:


    Good wood-berm view:


    Not real psyched on the particle-board, but has some good shapes:

  11. #111
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    We want to build some dj's up in a forest spot we ride. This would all be done by hand using existing dirt and downed wood. Is there a recommended wood to dirt ratio? Thinking about base and 3/4 of lip/landing wood and the rest dirt?

    We could build the line using the pit/bowl method and eliminate most of the wood. But lots of planted trees and roots that make deep digging a real pain. Also, lots of rain during some months, so kinda worried about drainage issues with this method.

    Any advice would be awesome!

  12. #112
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    The less wood, the better. When the wood starts to break down/rot, your jumps will suffer.

    Also, if your dirt isn't thick enough, when you need to make repairs (and you will) the logs can often reveal themselves right where you don't want them. You can't shape a lip with a log sticking out of it....

  13. #113
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    Lots of good info, thanks

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    I know a guy who travels all over building pump tracks dj and all kinds of dirt features if any one is intrested. They Just came to tallahassee and did some stuff here.

  15. #115
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    Just got done marking out a pump track in my backyard cant wait to get dirt and get started. Goona feature it on my site.
    Soil Taste Tester

  16. #116
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    I'm thinking about building a pump track in my backyard. The area that I'm using is on a slight hill, so I'll have a natural drop in, but my big concern is getting back to the top without having to do a ton of work. Any suggestions as to how to build to get back up a little easier?

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    Quote Originally Posted by K9Self View Post
    I'm thinking about building a pump track in my backyard. The area that I'm using is on a slight hill, so I'll have a natural drop in, but my big concern is getting back to the top without having to do a ton of work. Any suggestions as to how to build to get back up a little easier?
    There are several options. Upgradient rollers do work if they are carefully spaced and sized (we have upgradient rollers at my spot); you can also have upgradient jumps, where each set is a step up. The best option in my opinion though is to build a large structure at the low point of the property which artificially creates elevation and therefore generates kinetic energy--it can be a roll-in, a bank, a large quarter pipe, a quarter pipe to wallride, etc. See: Roll-ins - Ridemonkey.com. This is frequently done in skatepark and bikepark street course design.


    Although it's at a skatepark--this is a weirdly accurate replica of bmx style step-up rollers, or what could be also called a rollable double. For your upgradient rollers, it will be good to use this type of shape, because in a sense, a step-up is like a ladder that is getting you up the elevation, yet still giving good backside for your wheelbase to compress on to pump you up the gradient.


    Check out SPA Skatepark Design&Build; they are an excellent contractor here in Austin. Although most people don't think about it, there's a lot of design principles which apply to both skateparks and pump tracks--in both spots, you are engineering flow, with curves and spaces designed to not require pedaling (or kicking, with a skateboard).

    SPA Skateparks: Professional Skatepark Design. Design/Build Skateparks. Skatepark Construction. Skateboard Park Contractor. Skatepark Consultation. Custom Concrete Skateparks. Wooden Skateparks. Backyard Ramps. Skateboard Production Events. Contests.
    Last edited by cmc4130; 09-12-2011 at 01:21 PM.

  18. #118
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    Thanks cmc4130 - I think I'm going to try the rollers and see how that works out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by K9Self View Post
    Thanks cmc4130 - I think I'm going to try the rollers and see how that works out.
    cool, but i really think it's worth considering a wood build up at the low end of the property if you can. as i said there are a lot of varieties. look at it this way---it's actually cool that your area is not flat because you get to have a more unique setup....


    1. Wallride
    Highland MTB Park:


    2. Quarter pipe


    3. BMX-style Vert Wall (Quarter Blending into Vert Wall).
    This would be overkill for your pump track, but I'm including it just to illustrate the idea. BMX vert walls are one of the best speed-generators ever invented.


    4. Roll-in.
    I took this picture at Whistler Air Dome.


    5. Curved Slant Wall aka wood berm Technically a slant wall or "bank" is not a wall-ride; only vert walls are really walls. If you have a 180 berm on your pump track and it's at the lowest elevation of the your slanted yard, you may consider a curved slant wall all the way around the berm so that you can carve up it and get some height, generating more speed to go back up the gradient with.

    Winter Park:


    Diablo:

  20. #120
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    CMC you've convinced me to go with a wooden berm. So I've been researching/reading up on how to build one. I'm thinking about doing a 7' x 3' high berm. Using 1x6 for the planks. As for the posts I'm going to bury them into the ground and connect them horizontally to complete the frame. Any suggestions or tips on building the frame? I'm a visual person so I started looking thru pics for some ideas on how to build I found this picture. I really like how the berm starts level with the ground. I'm not going to be going that vertical with mine, but I like that idea. Opinions?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DJ , Pump Track plans-cf_wallride.jpg  


  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by K9Self View Post
    CMC you've convinced me to go with a wooden berm. So I've been researching/reading up on how to build one. I'm thinking about doing a 7' x 3' high berm. Using 1x6 for the planks. As for the posts I'm going to bury them into the ground and connect them horizontally to complete the frame. Any suggestions or tips on building the frame? I'm a visual person so I started looking thru pics for some ideas on how to build I found this picture. I really like how the berm starts level with the ground. I'm not going to be going that vertical with mine, but I like that idea. Opinions?
    3' is pretty short. if you want a short berm (whether wood or dirt), then it has to be steep-faced to work well.

    like this:




    the other thing is that a large radius turn soaks up speed while a short radius turn can help you maintain or even generate speed. if you have a 90 degree turn pointed back up gradient, then it's gotta be something you can "whip" out of.

    i want to keep this thread as general "plans" though, so if you want to keep discussing your specific layout, let's make a new thread. take some pics of your spot. how much gradient is there?

    also check out this thread. it had a similar question:
    help with jump line into berm - Ridemonkey.com


    this is a photo i took of the pump track at Whistler:


    note how steep/transitioned the faces of the berms are. this is the best way. they need to look like skateboarding bowl corners. you can't "whip" around a mellow-faced berm. you have to be able to get pinned sideways if you want to go fast.

  22. #122
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    New thread & pics of my area up - suggestions appreciated.

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    here's a drawing i did to illustrate two potential roller designs. clearly, dirt doesn't have to be exact, but i'm working on a project right now where we'll be using lumber, so they've got to be more exact....

    note the 2 styles of "dome." on the second set, the domes are mirror images of the bowls. by knowing that you're going to use 30 degrees of arc for each section, you end up with a certain spacing--in this case 2 foot tall works out pretty close to 15 feet peak to peak.

    larger rollers like this are good when you want to feel the whole wheelbase of your bike going up and over. a typical wheelbase of a dirt jumper is about 42" (axle to axle) or 68" (5'8") for the bike length with the wheels. so you can imagine there are a little less than 3 bike lengths from low point to high point to low point in this wave pattern. (3 exact bike lengths would be 17 feet.)



    i paced these rollers at Whistler at 20'-22'-ish feet apart. so definitely keep in mind that when you're going fast (like on these Flow-DH trails), rollers can be well-spaced.
    Last edited by cmc4130; 09-24-2011 at 08:19 AM.

  24. #124
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    great read here. this has helped a lot with my ideas for our local trail. while not a pump track i did pick up some ideas on designs for rollers and berms for our single track.

    thanks for this link cmc!

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4130 View Post
    for going up a slight incline or gaining speed from a slow speed consider an accelerating rollers design:

    I wish I would have seen this thread earlier, I just spent the whole day building rollers and I feel they are to close to each other. I think I'm going to re-work them and go for some accelerating rollers. Would the rollers you pictured here work with the small rollers going to large and then back to small? I would like to have the accelerating effect from both directions with a small gap jump at the largest roller that can also be jump in both directions. What would you recommend the spacing from peak to peak be for the 1',2',4' and 8' rollers?

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