Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 308
  1. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4130
    quick edit from one afternoon (Kristen's 'K-dog'' birthday jam)
    http://www.vimeo.com/16608877

    as you may be able to tell, my philosophy of pump tracks (and the austin/bmx style of pump track) is a pump track with full sized tables and rollable doubles mixed in. it's a blend of bmx trails and "pump track").

    that looks like one of the best spots Ive seen so far. due to everything looks rollable, yet, there are still some huge jumps in there to for people who can go big.

  2. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ayenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by irocss85
    that looks like one of the best spots Ive seen so far. due to everything looks rollable, yet, there are still some huge jumps in there to for people who can go big.
    Yeah, I saw footage of that a few months ago and fell in love! That is still the best layout I have seen for a hybrid pump track and the prototype ideal for anything I may ever try to build.

    The blend of structures is just too fun! it is the most versatile track I know of. Any rider of any skill type and level can ride that thing and have a blast and feel like they are improving.

  3. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    hey thanks ayenn and irocs . . . !

    here is a drawing of a beginner line of tables, followed by beginner/intermediate, followed by a sample of a more advanced line.

    the main thing for beginners is that a short gap does not necessarily make a jump easy. it's the steepness or mellowness that makes it easy. a beginner can clear 10 feet with the appropriate speed if a jump is mellow.

    as for the spacing, note that if you go by the guideline that your bowl should be roughly twice (but up to 3 times) the length of the gap you just cleared then you get a nice rhythm section with constant transition instead of having lots of flat space in between jumps.


    Last edited by cmc4130; 11-10-2010 at 04:41 PM.

  4. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrankyMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    762
    This thread rocks! Just looking at those plans and photos gets my blood pumping. I've been contemplating buying some land and building my own private bike park to ride on. Especially since land is so freaking cheap right now in Arizona.

  5. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    357
    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4130
    quick edit from one afternoon (Kristen's 'K-dog'' birthday jam)
    http://www.vimeo.com/16608877

    as you may be able to tell, my philosophy of pump tracks (and the austin/bmx style of pump track) is a pump track with full sized tables and rollable doubles mixed in. it's a blend of bmx trails and "pump track").
    MAN! that place has fun written all over it! SOOOO jealous! Is it city approved?!

    Austin eh? hrm... I need to start thinking of an excuse to go to Austin, hehe (for the GF, that spot is all the excuse I need)

  6. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    i'm posting this just to show what a difference some added height and steepness on a berm can make. this is the same berm going from relatively boring to gnarly corner-pocket-launcher.




  7. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    266
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr boo boo
    FInally got a chance to move some dirt. I had about 100 yds of clay to move to get the track started. I brought in a bobcat for a few hours and got a lot accomplished. The outside berms and lines are in place as well as the dirt for the 360 berms, Now I just need to get a chance to get out there and start shaping and compacting the dirt. I will be bringing in more dirt for the exisiting rollers and the rest of the inside lines.

    Nice work! I gota ask thoughif the chainlink is temporary or permanent. I know it would bother me to be jumping adjacent to a fence like that...just one more thing that could go wrong if you bobble slightly (hook bars). Looks really cool though.

  8. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    The lost art of the "Long and Low" or "Fast and Low." This is based around a 30 degree arc radius. The goal is not to go high, it's to go fast and stay low. This type of setup can be a great addition to your trails especially if you put steeper sets later on down the line. Because I drew the landing as a bowl with no flat space (and the bowl length is 1.5 times, rather than twice the length of the gap), the next lip will come at you pretty quick. However, that's pretty typical in on bmx race track rhythm sections so it's good to get used to.

    Remember with 2 or 3 foot tall jumps, you have to make the transition mellower than a taller jump, or else there is not enough wheelbase on the surface of the jump for your bike to transition from flat ground without it feeling abrupt. You can't put 70 degrees of arc on a lip 3 feet tall--it will be virtually unrideable. On the other hand, a 6 foot tall lip with 70 degrees of arc is a gnarly booster.





    As for 'degrees of arc' and trajectory. . . . keep in mind that riders can boost off a flatter jump and go into a higher trajectory path, or they can 'suck up the lip' (aka 'racering' a lip) to prevent the jump from sending them too high, so they can stay lower and faster. The jump does some of the work, but you and your bike do the rest.
    Last edited by cmc4130; 12-02-2010 at 03:19 PM.

  9. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351

    video from Cedar Park / Austin - Public Dirt Jump/Pump Track build day

    i did already post this in the trail building forum, but it would go well in this thread too. my crew will be out there again this weekend getting stuff dialed--it's not my local spot (it's about 25 miles away) but i some of my crew lives out there. so, the more spots to ride the better.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQ3OdYeNxgU

    Saturday and Sunday. 16 hours labor. 10.5 hours Bobcat run time. $40 in diesel. Shown in video: Line of roller and 4 big tabletops completed.
    Not shown in video: Another line of 2 berms, table and roller, dirt moved into place but not shaped and packed. A third line of 1 table, 135 degree berm and 4 rollers moved into place and only partly shaped/packed. (Not shown in video).

    From experience, my advice is even with a Bobcat, do not underestimate the amount of time and skilled labor required for shaping and packing !!

    Thanks to Austin Ridgeriders Mountain Bike Club/ for contributing the cost of the Bobcat rental.

  10. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351

  11. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    Very cool time-lapse of pump track being hand-dug. Note that they are digging from the riding line, not next to it, or from some other big hole. This is a good method, although it will create pits that hold water. There are ways to address that though, like having a slot drain next to the roller line.

    http://www.vitalmtb.com/videos/membe...78/drkost,1816

    "Here is a start-to-finish time lapse of the 604 pump track construction. We built the track in seven days over a period of two months. Thanks to everyone who volunteered their time and effort. Special thanks to Matt at North Shore Bike Shop. For more info check out http://dirtwest.blogspot.com Credit: dirtwest "

  12. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    this spot, which my friends built in the course of about 3 months, is a good demonstration of how, when you have flat ground, you may want to build a long crank-in run-up or, alternatively, a wood drop in. note that an 8 foot tall drop in was not quite tall enough to immediately be able to hit a double, without having a roller before it. spacing of the gaps and pits (lip to landing distance versus distance across the bowl to the next pit) roughly follows the rule that if your jump is 10 foot, lip to landing, you want at least double ( 20 feet) from the top of the landing to the lip of the next jump. you can go up to 23 or 25 . . .but if you go longer, then you will have serious slowness problem. the more you bowl down, the tighter you can put them. if you have actual flat space in between, it doesn't matter as much--but who really wants to have to put in a crank between sets??

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXi1t...layer_embedded

  13. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    Even though it's true you have to deal with water issues, digging from the riding line by using the pit/bowl method of construction speeds things up, for the reason that every shovel you dig down, you are effectively also building the line up. It's like double digging. The end result is a very clean looking line of dirt jumps because you are not digging random holes off to the side.




    [ EDIT (3/9/11): The jumps, which my friends built, in this video are designed and spaced pretty close to the above drawing (except maybe with 28' or so between top of landing to next lip): www.vimeo.com/20788809 ]

    This cover of the DIG MAGAZINE Trails issue is a very good visual of the end result. Note how the builders did not dig out the gap between the launch and landing (lame!!).

    To deal with water filling up pits, there are several methods--the best of which is digging an even deeper slot or deep/skinny dugout hole which you can then cover over with plywood or with stratgically placed flat rock. The water will drop down and soak downwards, allowing the riding line of the pit to not hold water.


    Last edited by cmc4130; 03-09-2011 at 04:08 PM.

  14. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    great example of a mellow lip for the first set and steeper stuff after that:


    from:
    http://www.pinkbike.com/forum/listco...56&pagenum=789

  15. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    This is a very well-done design for a public park:
    Superior Bike Park in Superior, CO

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/photos-...bike-park.html


  16. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    This was an awesome spot that just got dozed. (The perspective and camera lens makes the jumps look shorter than they actually were though).

    It's also a good illustration of the pit/bowl method of building, where you dig from the riding line to make the jumps. You might think of it as more like consecutive half-pipes dug into the ground.

    For a cleaner look, try to avoid digging next to the line to build the jumps . . . Dig only from the riding line. If you end up needing more dirt later and don't want to dig the bowl down more, then wheelbarrow it over from a future bowl. ... It requires a little more planning because as you build your landing you're also using some of the dirt from the pit/bowl to build the next launch. In the end, though, it's worth it, because your trails won't have moon craters.

    You can dig french drain style slots/holes to let the water drop down (all you need is for there to be a part of the pit that is deeper than the riding line of the pit... although if you're in a super rainy area, this may or may not work.


    photo by T.S.
    Last edited by cmc4130; 04-15-2011 at 09:40 AM.

  17. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jason B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by cmc4130
    cmc, you have the horizontal distances documented here real nicely, can you throw some vertical guidelines in. I'm going to shoot for something like this on the pump line line I have going. I want it to be more pump/jump like your drawing here.
    Transition Bank
    Transition ToP
    Transition Covert

  18. #93
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    One thing I haven't talked about yet on here are "Roller-Tables." They are an essential part of a rad pump track (or even bmx/mtbmx 'trails') in my opinion. For lack of a better word, they are blend of both a roller and a tabletop. They are not table-top jumps because the goal is to not really to jump but rather to stay super close and skim the top, and they are not rollers because they do not bubble up or have a bowl top lid--they flatten out. You're basically building a low-to-the-ground table top (anywhere from 1' to 3' tall, of varying lengths depending on your speed), then instead of having typical "lips" or corners at the lip and landing, you curve/fade the corner off, so that the lip/landing edges are rounded over. This allows the rider to stay low on the table for "un-air." Common in bmx racing. Staying low means going faster.



    One of the cool things about roller tables is that because you can skim over them, a lot of times you can do cool nose manuals across them and then pump the backside really hard.



    D.L. at WCPT

    O.M.P. at WCPT (photo by 9thstreetbmx)


    sometimes you will see roller-table style designs in cement skateparks. i couldn't find a better picture than this . . . but imagine if you were hitting the roller-table style pyramid in the middle of this park and just trying to stay low and pumping for speed (and the two grindboxes weren't there):
    Last edited by cmc4130; 04-26-2011 at 04:49 PM.

  19. #94
    pnj
    pnj is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    384
    check this backyard build.

    A backyard pump track is born!

  20. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,351
    The Physics of Trails Flow . . . .

    While I definitely don't think trails should be too mathematical / predictible / cookie-cutter, there is something weirdly addicting about a line that has an effortless, almost rhythmic flow. Every jump puts you right where you need to be for the speed that you have (without any special body english), and the next lip doesn't come at you too fast or too slow.

    It took me a while to figure out the connection with waves; when I first started digging, I learned some rules of thumb from older riders (e.g. the distance from top of landing to top of next lip should be roughly double the gap you just cleared) . . . but I never quite put my finger on why that was.

    It's not that jumps look like waves or even that they are spaced the same way that waves in the ocean would be . . . It's the rider's position over points in time has a consistency that is wave-like. Wave motion itself ( UP - DOWN - UP - DOWN .....) has a certain feeling to it that people intuitively recognize. Like if you're sitting on a boat and feeling the waves, or if you're listening to music with a good rhythm (most songs don't randomly speed up and slow down). It's a position or feeling over different points in time. If you space dirt jump sets erratically, you won't "feel" like you're riding across the terrain in a wave-motion.

    Not every line has to be this way. Variety is good. Sometimes 'tech' sets should throw you off a little and make you work for it (e.g. "racer" one set, boost another) and sometimes it's good to add weird elements like a waterfall, or rollers that you have to manual over to make it work..... But, as a starting point at least . . . consider 'wave' spacing......

    Hopefully this is helpful! :




    So remember, it's not that you make the jumps look like these waves. It's that the rider's highest point in the air, from one point to the next, is the "peak" . . . and the "peaks" are evenly spaced (over time) the same way the peaks of water waves are evenly spaced..... I say evenly spaced over time because if your jump line is on a decline and you are gaining speed, every set could actually get both longer-gap and longer distance to the next jump, but the rider is still going to hit each peak in the air every x number of seconds.

    Last edited by cmc4130; 04-28-2011 at 11:17 AM.

  21. #96
    bikerpilot
    Reputation: tootall's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    551
    Last night I figured what the heck and started digging in the empty lot behind the house. Terrible location: pancake flat, bakes in the sun most of the day with zero shade, will have a house built on it sooner or later; but I figured if I can get a small track rolling for a while I can learn some things.
    BMC FS01 29 X0
    Redline Monocog 29
    Jamis Supernova
    Rocky Mtn Flow DJ

  22. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    133
    Not near as dialed as some of the others (or all of them) but here is my solo build



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh4Jy...eature=related

  23. #98
    Swimming thru the Smog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    305
    Best place ive ever ridden is the I street jumps in salt lake city. Here is a good video from helmet cam of what looks like last years set up, good amount of building since then. You get to see some of the berms and mini pump track (i guess u can call it that) at the end after the ladder jumps. Either way there are a bunch of cool ideas and things in this park. Most of the stuff is relatively big and not for beginners, if this is the guy's cam i think it is, he is about 6'4.

    http://youtu.be/v70kUJlb5mA

  24. #99
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tlcrouch355's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    79
    Cool video.

  25. #100
    VP/ Terrain Designer
    Reputation: NastyNick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    631
    Not sure if it has allready been mentioned; but when building a pumptrack, there should never be any flat surfaces on the track. It should either be going up, down, or turning.
    Braun Enterprises LLC, Building Cool Stuff

Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •