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  1. #1
    Semi-Pro Ameteur
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    DJ Fork Characteristics

    So...

    I'm putting together a very bling urban/DJ bike with the extra dosh I've recently acquired. Urban and DJ venues are closer by and generally more convenient for getting out during the week so I figure another bike can't hurt.

    My question, though, is this:

    Given my super-limited experience with building jump bikes, I'm somewhat confused by the special DJ-specific forks on the market (Argyles, DJ1s, etc..). Are they actually substantially stronger than comparable-travel axled XC/AM forks (which I am much more familiar with)? If I were to stick, for example, a 20mm axle Manitou Minute on a DJ frame and go out and ride it regularly, would it snap on me? Looking at specs alone, it has a lot in common with the Argyle - Mag lowers, aluminum crown and steer tube. The only immediately noticeable structural difference is the steel stanchions on the Args against the aluminum ones on the minute.

    Thanks for entertaining my rather stupid question!
    Let's take Colorado and go chill with the British Isles.

  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Well, the steer tube on one may be thicker than the other. Castings can be different. Blah blah blah.

    If you're smooth or light, the Minute will hold up just fine. Though the travel may be a bit too much for urban/DJ.

  3. #3
    Semi-Pro Ameteur
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    I'm definitely light and reasonably smooth on the rides I normally do - although I'm fairly certain smoothness on the trail doesn't directly translate into smoothness in the landings.

    In any case, thanks for the advice. I've got a great offer on a 100mm 20mm axle Minute I may well take up.
    Let's take Colorado and go chill with the British Isles.

  4. #4
    dirt rules
    Reputation: sittingduck's Avatar
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    If you jump your bike, your fork will die. Fact of life. How fast it dies, is the question. Get the strongest one you can.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    strength is not the only issue to consider. . . .

    an xc fork is designed to give you a smooth ride on uneven/bumpy/rocky surfaces. hence the "mushy" feeling.

    but, on a DJ fork, you don't want it to "mush" too much off the lips of jumps or as you're pumping the launch or the landing. it's not just an issue of big impacts, it's how it responds to compressing your body.

    it seems like it used to be that all DJ forks used stiff springs. but now, with the lightness trend, there are some all-air fork options that people are riding on jumps/pump track/4x. like the marzocchi 4x and the x-fusion velvet-r.

    my manitou gold label dirt jumper is very responsive to lips and and compresses/rebounds really well in pump track / bmx track riding. it does not work that great for xc riding. marzocchi dirt jumper 1 and 2 seem a little better for cross-over xc and DJ riding. i've never ridden a manitou minute, but i do have a manitou elite from several years ago that is terrible at the jumps/pump track.

  6. #6
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    I had the internals blow out of one Manitou Elite within six months and the steerer break loose out of another,(runnig two DJ bikes during this time as well). So, I would say Manitou defiitely not DJable. I've been running DJ IIIs for years now with 2-3 trips per week to the jumps and have had no issues what so ever. However, the DJs are very heavy and it looks as though the new lightweight version jump forks are pretty good so I may be on the lookout for something new (Marz 4x maybe) in the near future.

  7. #7
    Semi-Pro Ameteur
    Reputation: PacificPilot's Avatar
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    So, in short, there's no hope of tuning the pressure/compression or internals on the Minute to make it work for DJ and urban, and I'll probably destroy it when I case it in a bad way anyway?

    Thanks for all the input, by the way. I'm a little less urban ignorant now.
    Let's take Colorado and go chill with the British Isles.

  8. #8
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    2005 DJ1 puts all other forks to shame, end of story. Three years of daily abuse and I haven't even topped off the air since the day I bought it. Seriously, you can't buy quality like that anymore.

  9. #9
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    +1 on the marz dj forks there are heavy but you can put them throught a beating and they come back for more plus with all diff kinds of kits out there its very easy to shorten the travel and you can usually pick one up pretty cheap.

    the gold labels are really good forks to (sux they stoped making them) but if u can find one that would be second choice

    good luck to ya

  10. #10
    fear this
    Reputation: Mesozoic's Avatar
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    I used to run a DJ3 on my urban rig, but it just got stolen last Friday. I'm building a new chromo framed bike this time (Brodie Miscreant - long) and I'm forking out for an Argyle 302. I've heard nothing but great things about these forks.
    Norco Fluid LT
    Devinci Ollie, some goodies to lighten 'er up

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