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  1. #1
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    Disc brake alignment! Ahh!

    Alright so here we go again...As everyone probably knows by now I have an '05 steelhead. I got all the stuff for the rear end so I was getting that together. Only problem...when the wheel is all the way forward the disc rotor doesn't quite line up with the caliper, like it is too far forward. I can move it back and it fits alright but how do I make sure the wheel is parallel with the dropouts? Any hardware exist for this? I'm running a rear derailleur if it makes a difference. Even when I got it lined up I look at the rotor and the contact area stops about 2mm short of the cutouts on the inside. I'm pretty new to the whole disc brake thing so any advice would be appreciated, thanks. I'm going to buy a book soon so I should be asking less questions then.

  2. #2
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    You can use dual chain tensioners, or if the wheel is dished right, make sure there is the same amount of frame/tire clearance on each side.

  3. #3
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    this is a well known problem with steelheads, which I also I mentioned in your other thread as well.
    This won't matter as much since you are running a geared setup though, unless you are a stickler and feel you absolutely need the shortest dropouts possible on that frame.
    you can use tensioners for your dropouts to align the axle, some use them on both sides, as XSL_WiLL mentioned, but I find that completely unnecessary and only run one on the drive side, then align using the stays as a guage for centering. You can find some tensioners made for mtb, such as the Surly, but I like a lot of the bmx offerings a bit better. If you have a 10mm axle, a 3/8 bmx tensioner should work just fine.
    Are you running a quick-release axle??? if so, ditch it for a solid 10mm bolt on axle kit for your hub, it is much more stable and won't slide.
    Last edited by BikeSATORI; 09-21-2006 at 03:52 PM.
    Schralp it Heavy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeSATORI
    this is a well known problem with steelheads, which I also I mentioned in your other thread as well.
    This won't matter as much since you are running a geared setup though, unless you are a stickler and feel you absolutely need the shortest dropouts possible on that frame.
    you can use tensioners for your dropouts to align the axle, some use them on both sides, as XSL_WiLL mentioned, but I find that completely unnecessary and only run one on the drive side, then align using the stays as a guage for centering. You can find some tensioners made for mtb, such as the Surly, but I like a lot of the bmx offerings a bit better. If you have a 10mm axle, a 3/8 bmx tensioner should work just fine.
    Are you running a quick-release axle??? if so, ditch it for a solid 10mm bolt on axle kit for your hub, it is much more stable and won't slide.

    Nope I'm running a 10mm axle. I assume it's 10mm at least, it's an azonic outlaw.

  5. #5
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    Crap the outlaws have a 12mm thru axle on the rear instead of 10mm...are the 10mm ones available anywhere for the outlaw? And apparently I have to loosen the caliper to take the wheel off or the disc rotor gets in the way. Bah....
    Last edited by sovietspyguy; 09-21-2006 at 06:47 PM.

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