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Thread: Building DJ's

  1. #1
    The Beaver
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    Building DJ's

    OK I am trying to build a two or three dirt jumps in my back yard (until my parents find them, any way I am on about 8 acres). I have one built but i clear the landing, so my questions is. How big should a table top be? for about a 2-3 foot high jump. and how long should there be between jumps? with room to build the jumps bigger.


    I am new to DJ'ing but ready to learn.

    Thanks, Beaver
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  2. #2
    Hmm..doughnuts
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    Try experimenting with the distance between the jumps to see what you feel comfertable with. If you actually have 8 acres, you should have no problem with space. And one of the cool things about dirt is that it can be manipulated. Mess around with a shovel until it feels right.
    Need to find a cheap Marzocchi DJ3 fork cheap

  3. #3
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    If you're doing a table I would do it atleast 8ft for the deck. Keep in mind you wanna lay these lines out on a slight downhill slope. Also since you're kinda new I would do like an A Line with the jumps spaced out several feet to allow you to line up for the next jump. Once you get better you can knock down the take off and move it closer to the prev. landing. Making the gap bigger and spacing the jumps closer.

  4. #4
    The Beaver
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    ok sweet... yeah trial trekker I am building it on a down slop not to steep but it is long enough for about 10 jumps if i ever want to do that much work. ServeEm 8 feet....... ok..... I shall get to work tomorrow.
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  5. #5
    tuck-n-roll master
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    Filling in tabletops with just dirt is a pain in the ass. Look for some old tires to take up some of the space. Lay 'em down stacked up like you would bricks and fill the centers. Holds some of your dirt in place too if you case it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cru Jones
    Yikes. We need to add about 10 years onto that age. Unless she's a smokin hottie, then maybe 5...

  6. #6
    The Beaver
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    ok I have been using logs (stacking them like firewood) and covering them in dirt
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  7. #7
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    Never use filler...you will regret it.

  8. #8
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    we used cement bags to fill in a tabletop once
    when a guy came with a tractor to knock em down he was quite surprised

  9. #9
    resident dumbass
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    heh heh heh . . .

    I'd make your tabletop wider. an 8 foot jump isn't very far. Maybe 10 atleast? Even I can do an 8 footer.
    I'm out of things to say . . .

  10. #10
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    Make your gap at least twice as long as the jump is high. If your lip is 2 feet high, your gap should be at least 4 feet. Also realize that dirt jumping is a skill that you have to develop. Every jump is not going to be perfect and allow you to jump off and land exactly where your speed carries you. You have to learn to control your speed and your bike so you can put it down where ever your landing happens to be. A fun line has a mix of jumps of different sizes and shapes. Forget about tables, they are too much dirt, too much digging. Making doubles is much much easier and less work. Plus it is easier to re-position the landing if it isn't right. If you're building on a slope, you're going to gain speed as you go, so your jumps should get bigger as you go down the line. Do not use filler items like logs. Rain and weather will ruin them. Take your time and build a solid jump. Use clay as much as possible. It's really a trial and error thing. Just keep digging.

  11. #11
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    Do exactly what hucker said

  12. #12
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    Good Question... Here's the resource I've been using

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/categor.../dirt-jumping/


    BUNCHES of GREAT INFO....
    Not to mention that Lee McCormick and Brian Lopes book has a bunch of good stuff in it too.

  13. #13
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    totally

    sounds like ridee and hucker are shootin straight...good advise.....keep in mind you
    can prop up pallets like a table top on the landing till you feel confident about nosing into
    the landings every time....cheap, easy, and plenty safe....

    --------------------djdj--------------------------------palletpalletpalletdjdjdj--------------------------------------------
    ------------------dj----dj------------------------------b-------------------dj----------dj---------------------------------------
    ---------------dj----------dj---------------------------o------------------dj-------------------dj-------------------------------
    -----------dj------------------dj-----------------------a-----------------dj----------------------------dj-----------------------
    ------dj--------------------------dj--------------------r-----------------dj------------------------------------dj---------------
    -dj----------------------------------dj-----------------d---------------dj---------------------------------------------dj--------
    It should be WAY BIGGER John I'm so out of shape!

  14. #14
    I post too much.
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    I really like that diagram.

  15. #15
    Hmm..doughnuts
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    That diagram is pretty awesome. Why can't everything be that simple?
    Need to find a cheap Marzocchi DJ3 fork cheap

  16. #16
    bcd
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    i use 50gal barrels i found for fill. and they do fill a lot!

  17. #17
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    [SIZE="2"]
    Link to some good info on hcor.net:

    http://www.hcor.net/postlite25881-wheelie+nelson.html

    cut and paste from my post w/ great info from 9th Street local and builder Wheelie Nelson:



    The downslope for a start is good.
    You might want to find out who owns the property before you get too involved with your time. Nothing's worse than working for months to get things going only to find them leveled one day.
    Secluded park land and floodplain areas are the way to go.
    You'll want to bury some big logs, big rocks, etc. to save dirt.
    If you have the money and a dumptruck can get down there then I would go ahead and buy some good dirt. I don't know how good the dirt is there so that's always an option. You can build a pretty nice set of doubles with two loads of dirt. Time is $ and it takes forever to fill up 50 wheelbarrows.
    A general rule is to have about twice the distance between the top edge of the landing to the top edge of the next lip as there is between the gap of the previous jump.
    Therefore, a 12' double should have around 24' to the top of the next lip. (I've measured 9th street before and this is what works best.) You don't want to cram things too close together because then you can't make things bigger without moving what you've built and the pits between jumps feeling too quick.
    Of course mix in some rollers, hips and berms in there somewhere.
    Hopefully there is somewhere to get water too.
    Also, try not to point the jumps toward the sunset. This is a problem on a few jumps at 9th street and you don't realize it until you've built things already.
    Another thing you might want to do since it's level is to have a line coming back toward the start for obvious reasons.
    I've been building stuff for a very long time so let me know if you have any questions
    A lip 5' feet tall with a 9' tranny will give you around 10' of distance.
    A 5' lip with a 10' tranny will give you around 12' feet of distance. You can cut some templates out of wood to help guide you if you're not good at shaping lips.
    A regular dumptruck (no trailer) is 12 cubic yards.
    If you bury a little something and have one load dumped on the lip and one dumped at the landing you can take some dirt from the lip and throw it on the landing and get a decent jump out of it. Around 5' tall.
    If you want to make big jumps and you have the money then one load for the lip and two loads on the landings.
    A typical load will run you around 60-80 bucks delivered.
    The dirt itself is only about 2 or 3 bucks per yard if you can pick it up yourself. It's the delivery that's expensive.
    Also, make sure you get it dumped as close to the right spots as possible because it is a major pain to move an entire load just a couple of feet with shovels.
    Get dirt with some clay mixed in.
    Usually, if you're buying a lot, you can go down in the pit and pick your own dirt from the local supplier.
    Here's a place here in Austin that I designed and had built:
    http://photobucket.com/albums/v389/9...t/New%20Place/

    Hopefully you'll have some help because it's a lot of work.
    There is not much to add as Wheelie really knows how to build but...

    If you have 8 acres to work with, I would try to find a good area w/ a slight downslope and not many big trees. Save up for a Bobcat or get some friends to help dig and you'll have a dope place to ride in no time. Also, make the parents happy by keeping the place clean, in an area that is not an eye sore. You can help it look good by transplanting plants and trees, and planting grass in certain spots.
    [/SIZE]

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