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  1. #1
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    Best setup to pull up the front of bike

    Sorry for this newbie question but...

    I have 5,6 , using 16 frame (55mm top tube), 35mm extension stem and 100mm fork and its hard to me to pull the front of the bike, to do some tricks.
    Which would be the best setup (stem , frame,...) to pull up the front of the bike ?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    And I have low rise handle bar

  3. #3
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    Reputation: dirtjumper202's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by urubullino
    And I have low rise handle bar
    Go to the gym and start working out, build upper body strength. If you have trouble pulling up the front, I can only imagine how hard it is for you to bunny hop, haha.
    Sinister DNA / [size=1]Argyle 409[/size]
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  4. #4
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    Question is pretty broad...just get your weight over the back wheel and lean back slightly and then gently pull up... I'm not sure if you can or high how you can hop but just yanking up on the bars won't do much good if you aren't balanced. You may try a 2 or 3 inch rise bar too...

  5. #5
    dirt rules
    Reputation: sittingduck's Avatar
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    Forget about thinking you can magically set your bike up to make it easier to manual. If you can manual, the bike doesn't matter. If you can't manual, you'll just have to practice. A lot.

  6. #6
    AWESOME!
    Reputation: yzracer141's Avatar
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    Get a decent riser bar. By decent, I mean like 3 inches.

  7. #7
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    yzracer141, thanks
    sittingduck, magically no , but I can have some improvement with a right setup.
    yzracer141said about height to pull. And about the distance or angle of frame?
    JGill, If I use short stem or short frame, I could get my weight over the back more easily or not?

  8. #8
    Roll on Spring Time!
    Reputation: juan pablo's Avatar
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    Riser bar helps but I went throuogh a similar experience when I switched from XC riding. I also rode clipped in and cheat by pulling up on my pedals. I planned on switching to flats so I made the effort to start practicing correct bunny hop technique first. After watching the Fundamentals DVD I saw the light. If you plan on just pulling up on the bars forget it.
    Its kinda hard to explain but its a mix of compressing your fork followed by scooping down and slightly forward with your feet as you move your body back. It worked a treat for me and then I realised I wasnt actualy compressing my fork first. When I started to do that my front shot up every time. I have to admit its a ton of practice.

  9. #9
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    Juan, Im geting the dvd to look and learn.
    ServEm, tt is 55cm or 21' 1/2 and the is a xc frame . Hmm... If the frame is wrong which would be right (angles, size, dimensions,...) for my height ?
    Thanks very much

  10. #10
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    Juan, Im geting the dvd to look and learn.
    ServEm, tt is 55cm or 21' 1/2 and the is a xc frame . Hmm... If the frame is wrong which would be right (angles, size, dimensions,...) for my height ?
    Thanks very much

  11. #11
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    16" frame sounds big for your height. Sounds like the frame can be too long making pulling up hella harder. You put 55mm tt, i'm assuming you put the wrong length unless you have a 2" long tt.

    what kinda frame do you have, if it's a xc frame the geo is wrong for tricks.

    BTW I'm about your height and my old dj frame was a 13" frame.

  12. #12
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    Thank. I will study about before buying

  13. #13
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    yea a xc isn't an ideal frame for doing freestyle on. You want at least a dj frame if not a park specific frame.

    when I'm thinking dj frames I'm picturing longer cs and slacker ht angles. I wanna say all the other lengths and angles are close to similar

    park specific i'm thinking shorter cs and steeper ht angles.

    I don't really disect bikes, I just love to ride em

  14. #14
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    yeah one of the most common mistakes is thinking you can turn any bike into a DJ/park bike, they make bike specially built for those areas for a reason. The geo of the bike being one of them to help you out better while riding, also their built tougher so they can take what a xc bike wouldn't be able to take.
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  15. #15
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    Since you're 5'6", apparently new to mtb/bmx, I suggest you get a 20" bmx to learn tricks on, or a 24" wheel mtbmx/dirt jumper. Although it is possible to be 5'6" and rock on a 26" dirt jumper (a lot of people do) I'm just saying that 24" is going to feel better.

    Here's an example of a 24" wheel mtmbx. The NS SUBURBAN 24.


  16. #16
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    honestly ain't nuttin more fun to me than my 20" My 20" gets more play than any other of my rigs in the stable.

  17. #17
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    Could be 24. I already thought in do that. But i Will need a frame first.Frame that can I put 24 or 26 and rear derailleur suport.

  18. #18
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    I'm 5'6'' and I have no trouble manualing my bike all day long.

    An XC bike is not strong enough and has shitty geometry to do tricks on, I'd switch frames if not bikes completely. Your chainstays are probably much too long hindering you in manualing, you're probably like me and your legs are too short for your weight to go far back enough to manual a longer chainstay'd frame.

  19. #19
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by urubullino
    Yes, you are completely right. What frame do you have?
    Im looking some frames and there are many interessant options... Some frames that you can use derailleur, rim brakes (24 and 26) , disc brakes (24 and 26) , adjustable chainstay distance,...
    I have a nemesis project secret agent with a custom geometry, kinda pricey, what's your budget?

  20. #20
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    Yes, you are completely right. What frame do you have?
    Im looking some frames and there are many interessant options... Some frames that you can use derailleur, rim brakes (24 and 26) , disc brakes (24 and 26) , adjustable chainstay distance,...

  21. #21
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    Technique plays a role, but the biggest part is frame Geometry.
    What you want is a frame with the shortest possible chainstays and a medium to short top tube.
    The shorter the chainstay the less leverage. If you are riding 26" The shortest chainstays will be found on the Last Raffnix or Cord frames

    If 24" check out NS Bikes The Suburban 24" or the Capital frames.
    It all depends what you want to ride too:
    Street frames: Generally have a short top tube and super short chainstays. This combined with a steep head-angle makes the bike very agile and easy to throw around for tech street moves.
    DJ Frames: Typically have short chainstays, but a slightly longer top tube than the street frame would. Head angle is a little slacker too. This means that the bike is still agile, but a little less twitchy (as you have more hang time to pull moves on DJ's than you would street sections).

    I Hope that I didnt blab on too much here, and this helps some people.

    Ben.

    The worlds leading Street/Park/DJ MTB Online storefront.

  22. #22
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    Get a long stem, good set of riser bars. Longer stems are typically run by trials guys like myself. My street bike thats not my trials rig has a long stem, and riser bars.

    Notice here how long the stem is. Also, thats a little over 12 foot drop to the ground on loose rocks. Fockin scary line that one was. I just like posting pics too lol.








  23. #23
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    thank you for information.
    Street Rider, what do you think about 24 bicycles frames, they can run with 24 and 26

  24. #24
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by urubullino
    thank you for information.
    Street Rider, what do you think about 24 bicycles frames, they can run with 24 and 26
    Heavy as all hell. Go with a bike that is wheel size specific, bikes that can run both are full of compromises and generally don't handle as well.

  25. #25
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    I can manual an XC bike just fine.

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