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Thread: 36/17 or 36/18?

  1. #1
    resident dumbass
    Reputation: dirtyharry's Avatar
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    36/17 or 36/18?

    If you didn't know, I got a bike about a month ago.
    Anyway,
    It's set up singlespeed with a 36 front and a 16 rear. I can go crazy fast and stuff, but up the steep hills is a no-no (I can do it, but it is a pain and takes a while), and for some odd reason it's too hard to wheelie (too hard on my back, that is). I'm thinking of switching it out to a 17t, but will that make enough of a difference? Should I go with an 18t, which will make my bike really really easy to wheelie, or will that slow my bike down a lot?

    Right now I'm pretty set on a 17t, unless there's any good reasons to go with 18t?
    I'm out of things to say . . .

  2. #2
    nOOb now rOOkie
    Reputation: Str8NoobYo's Avatar
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    i run 2:1 and i can stand up wheelie all day but not sittin

  3. #3
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Still haven't seen pictures.

  4. #4
    resident dumbass
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    i can't get the pictures to load! Can't you just answer me under the assumption I do have the bike I'm talking about!

    Okay, fine, here's a f**cked up picture, but atleast you can see a bike.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I'm out of things to say . . .

  5. #5
    mtbr remember
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    yo grom, you finally got a bike!!! heyhey, congrats! Looks pretty solid too.

    well, as for your gear ratio, learn to ride wheelies going fast! catch up to your gear ratio where your legs can lift the front end much easier. if not, and confidence is an issue, try going with a smaller front chainring instead of a larger rear cog. I prefer the smaller set-ups, and a down side to going larger is that more than likely, you could need a new chain to cover the extra teeth. With a smaller one, you just remove the necessary couple of links or so depending on the change.
    Now, I am not necessarily recommending, but most start of at the 2:1 for 26" wheels, so 32:16 might help you out a decent amount, but you can run out of speed rather quickly. If that's what you want, is a lower-speed more technical bike, and confidence booster, then there you go. and chainrings are pretty cheap, look at a Salsa SS, rampless/pinless chainring in 104mm X 4hole X 32t for your saints.
    Post up more pics of your setup, like the rear-end as well, I'm sure everybody wouldn't mind checking it out after all the ruckus in the early season...
    Schralp it Heavy.

  6. #6
    Rollin' twenties.
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    your brusier owns mine

    and ferget wheelies, manies are the way to go

  7. #7
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    Wheelies can be useful for some drops, so it's nice to know you can pull one off at any time.

  8. #8
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    I'd go 18t 'cause 2:1 seems perfect for me on a 26er. However, I like an easy gear ratio. If you want the ability to crank it go for the 17t, the best of both worlds.

  9. #9
    I post too much.
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    Ojai seems right on the money.

  10. #10
    resident dumbass
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    BikeSATORI, I'll have enough extra chain: the derailler that's on there (why? I have no clue. It came that way) gives me extra if I take it off. I'd rather go with a smaller chainring, but it'd be a bit cheaper to buy a new cog (and quicker to replace too), and besides, I wanna see how the bike shop does it all (I want to be able to extend my bike servicing a bit).
    I'm out of things to say . . .

  11. #11
    mtbr remember
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtyharry
    BikeSATORI, I'll have enough extra chain: the derailler that's on there (why? I have no clue. It came that way) gives me extra if I take it off. I'd rather go with a smaller chainring, but it'd be a bit cheaper to buy a new cog (and quicker to replace too), and besides, I wanna see how the bike shop does it all (I want to be able to extend my bike servicing a bit).

    you don't want to run a singlespeed with a thin, wobbly/weak 9-spd chain.
    also, since you are running a geared setup with a derailleur right now, that means you will probably have to buy a single speed kit for your 9spd hub too (or you could go pvc and a cheap DX cog)... I don't think a $20 salsa SS chainring is that expensive, and you can change one yourself in about 5min, without needing the shops help.
    but do it however you want, you'll eventually learn from experience.
    Schralp it Heavy.

  12. #12
    resident dumbass
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    It's already been single-speed kitted. The derailler is basically on as a chain tensioner of a sort, I think.
    I'm out of things to say . . .

  13. #13
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
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    Make sure that you have a decent non-ramped/pinned chainring and cog.

    Use a quality chain. Shadow Conspiracy Interloc V2s are my favorite.

  14. #14
    resident dumbass
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    I'm almost certain this is a quality chain. This guy I bought if off of really built up a killer of a bike.
    I'm out of things to say . . .

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