Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    244

    26" Cruisers versus Modern Geometry Bikes for Older Guys

    Lately, my friends and I have been messing around on his 26" SE Quadangle and my old 20" 1991 GT Pro Series. I've found my old GT to be extremely small and unforgiving, with a couple of nasty crashes to prove it.

    I've actually gotten used to his big Quadangle, can bunnyhop it a good two feet without too much effort and am not paranoid about landing slightly nose high and having the bike loop out from underneath me, which my GT has done to both of us.

    It's been a blast, and now I want another bike. I'm not going to be doing anything extreme or dirt-jumping; I want something to cruise around town on for several miles while bunny-hopping up curbs and stairs, riding wheelies, and, hopefully, learning to manual.

    Do I want a 26" cruiser like an OM Flyer or Volume Sledgehammer, or something way different like an NS Holy? I have to say, I'm drawn to something like the Sledgehammer which looks like an adult sized BMX bike with a seat you can raise for cruising around. I've never ridden something like the NS Holy, or even seen pics of bikes like this with the seat raised. Will a bike like the Holy bunny hop a lot easier with those short chainstays, but cruise around just fine with the seat raised?

    Which bike do you think I'd be better off with? I'm thinking something like the Holy will be too single-purpose aggressive for me to use to its potential with the kind of riding I'll be doing, but I'm not sure.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by CoastieTX View Post
    Lately, my friends and I have been messing around on his 26" SE Quadangle and my old 20" 1991 GT Pro Series. I've found my old GT to be extremely small and unforgiving, with a couple of nasty crashes to prove it.

    I've actually gotten used to his big Quadangle, can bunnyhop it a good two feet without too much effort and am not paranoid about landing slightly nose high and having the bike loop out from underneath me, which my GT has done to both of us.

    It's been a blast, and now I want another bike. I'm not going to be doing anything extreme or dirt-jumping; I want something to cruise around town on for several miles while bunny-hopping up curbs and stairs, riding wheelies, and, hopefully, learning to manual.

    Do I want a 26" cruiser like an OM Flyer or Volume Sledgehammer, or something way different like an NS Holy? I have to say, I'm drawn to something like the Sledgehammer which looks like an adult sized BMX bike with a seat you can raise for cruising around. I've never ridden something like the NS Holy, or even seen pics of bikes like this with the seat raised. Will a bike like the Holy bunny hop a lot easier with those short chainstays, but cruise around just fine with the seat raised?

    Which bike do you think I'd be better off with? I'm thinking something like the Holy will be too single-purpose aggressive for me to use to its potential with the kind of riding I'll be doing, but I'm not sure.

    how tall are you? i'm asking because the question relates to how high you'd have to run the seatpost for more of a "cruzer" setup.

    have you seen the Texas Firemans cruzers? they are pricey, but very cool. on those bikes, note how laid back the seatpost angle is.... what this does is when you raise the seat, it gets further back and puts you in a sit-and-crank-to-cruze position. bikes where the seattube angle is steep you will not get the same kind of leg extension/leverage, unless you run a laid-back post. for whatever reason, laid-back posts have become pretty rare. they are definitely out there on ebay though.

    the new Sledgehammer actually looks to be pretty badass. one of my friends has the older sledgehammer and he jumps it and everything. the seat tube and top tube are tall, but they're not too tall that you can't slam the seat and still jump well.

    on the other hand, some of the new all-rigid complete MTBMX bikes could work really well as cruzers as well. the head angle will be like 69 or 70, which will feel more old school, versus 73.5 on the Sledgehammer.

    even though i rode bmx for 20+ years, i personally like the geometry of a 26" MTBMX bike better than a 26"BMX. something about the slightly slacker head angle and nice short rear end feels more "moto"cross and feels like it wants to fly, and once you're in the air it feels very stable.

    26"BMX cruisers though have not really caught up, geo wise. the long back ends don't make for snappy bunnyhops etc. i predict in the future though, the two formats will sort of merge even more--at least for street/park riding.



    new Sledge:
    Pumped up Volume Sledgehammer « cruiser revolution

    buddy on his older Sledgehammers:



    26" bmx/cruiser
    26" bmx/cruiser - Ridemonkey.com

    26" BMX advice
    26" BMX Advice - VintageBMX.com


    if you were to run an all rigid 26" MTBMX / dirt jumper, you could have a pretty sweet setup too, though.

    Blackmarket MOB


    cornfed's Transition with 4" rise Immortis BMX bars:


    i also run 4" rise Immortis bars on my Blackmarket. seen next to my Liquid 24" BMX with 8.25" bars.


    since i'm tall the 4" bars combined with 80mm travel fork actually feel pretty good both jumping and cruising....



    you could get something like a Haro Steel Reserve 1.1, but put regular 4" or 5" bmx cruiser bars on it, with the stem all the way down, and it would be pretty sick. very similar to a Sledgehammer, but with a slightly slacker HA.

    Last edited by cmc4130; 08-15-2011 at 06:35 PM.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    244
    Thanks for the info.

    I'm a tall guy - 6'3". I realize this bike will never be able to cruise around like my XC MTBs.

    What I don't understand about all these bikes with the super short stays and slammed seats is how they're ridden just trying to get around. Riding 5 miles to downtown through the city, and back, while standing the whole time doesn't sound like fun. Can you just raise the seat a bunch and it's fine? I know I could ride my friend's 26" Quadangle with the seat raised on a ride like this and be fine - but if I can do the same on one of the other bikes, and it really does handle better, then that's what I'd want.

    I guess I'm wondering if people ever use their urban/jumper bikes this way, because I never, ever, see pictures of them with the seats raised.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by CoastieTX
    I guess I'm wondering if people ever use their urban/jumper bikes this way, because I never, ever, see pictures of them with the seats raised.
    I use my MTB for getting around also (Jackal), but I don't raise the seat, I don't need to. I grew up on BMXs and am quite used to standing whilst riding, but if I'm feeling lazy then I do sit down and pedal and that's just fine - I'm 6' 2" BTW. You won't be getting much leg extension doing it this way but for just lazy cruising around, it's absolutely fine

    As cmc4130 said, 26" BMXs haven't caught on here either yet, and I'm not sure that they will given that 26" dirt/street MTBs are around. I would agree that the formats will most likely merge somewhat. A 26" MTB with the geometry of the Jackal or similar is just so much more workable. In fact, more often than not I choose to use my 24" cruiser or 26" MTB for getting to and from work rather than my road bike which is built for this type of purpose (cruising around). And I definitely am not standing the entire journey. I love how snappy they both are which can easily get you out of a lot of tight places if need be.

    The thing about these bikes is that they make you want to ride them a bit silly, and that generally means you'll be standing up at least a bit of the time.....

  5. #5
    Welsh Dave
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    266
    Not much input, as modern trail bikes are beyond my field.
    But the 26-inch Fireman's Cruiser is based on the geometry of the original SE OM Flyer and is (or was) welded by former SE welder, Sal.

    Yeah, the seat tubes are way too slack for my liking. for anything but cruising around.

    There's going to be a reíssue of the Mongoose Kos BMX cruiser this year. Much taller seat tube than a modern trails bike & designed for a short, rigid fork. Not sure if they've changed the geometry at all from the original Kos, but something about the look of the frame in profile isn't floating my boat.

    The 2012 OM Flyer and 26 Quad, tho, are looking amazing. If you're not into disk brakes or features of a modern dirt jumper, one of those two SEs would be my choice.

  6. #6
    I Void Waranties
    Reputation: Punkeyboozter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    541
    Sounds to me you need one of these...

    Santa Cruz Bicycles

    They are strong, can be build fairly light and jumps just fine. Besides It more old man friendly.
    The 1st production mountain bike was sold in 1984.
    Anti EBB

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,378
    At 52 I suppose I qualify for an old guy. I came up with this...



    so much fun to ride

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    582
    yo, that stylus looks very sweet! What fork are you running with that?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    159
    I do 5 mile rides on my DJ. I do have a qr seat post clamp and raise the seat for longer rides with my kid. But, we are always looking for things to pop off of/hop over so not much time to sit down.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,378
    Quote Originally Posted by Moozh View Post
    yo, that stylus looks very sweet! What fork are you running with that?
    thanks, fork is a Surly Instigator

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: go-pirates's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    519
    Coastie TX, I realize I'm WAAYY late to the party...but what did you end up with? I'm thinking about buying an SE OM Flyer. I plan to cruise, jump, even race it. I know the geometry is considered oldschool, but hey, it worked just fine back in the day. Good enough for the founding fathers of BMX, good enough for me.....
    "Caught my first tube this morning....sir!"

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by go-pirates View Post
    Coastie TX, I realize I'm WAAYY late to the party...but what did you end up with? I'm thinking about buying an SE OM Flyer. I plan to cruise, jump, even race it. I know the geometry is considered oldschool, but hey, it worked just fine back in the day. Good enough for the founding fathers of BMX, good enough for me.....
    check out the new Volume Sledgehammer 26" bmx though. i personally feel like it's a much better bike than the OM Flyer.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    244
    Quote Originally Posted by go-pirates View Post
    Coastie TX, I realize I'm WAAYY late to the party...but what did you end up with? I'm thinking about buying an SE OM Flyer. I plan to cruise, jump, even race it. I know the geometry is considered oldschool, but hey, it worked just fine back in the day. Good enough for the founding fathers of BMX, good enough for me.....
    I ended up buying an OM Flyer complete and it's been a blast. I ride this bike all over town with the seat raised and it doesn't stop me a bit bunnyhopping over obstacles one wheel high. It also wheelies like a champ. When SE offered the bike in chrome, that sealed the deal for me. I even put my old Redline Flight cranks on the bike without any issues. Here's some pics of the bike, and me bunnyhopping my friend's 26" Quad Angle:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26" Cruisers versus Modern Geometry Bikes for Older Guys-om1.jpg  

    26" Cruisers versus Modern Geometry Bikes for Older Guys-om-flyer-profile-pic.jpg  

    26" Cruisers versus Modern Geometry Bikes for Older Guys-om-flyers-together.jpg  

    26" Cruisers versus Modern Geometry Bikes for Older Guys-om3.jpg  


  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jfactor1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    42
    OK, the Cru Jones OM Flyer is freaking SICK!!!



    Back on topic, I recently rode my KHS DJ-300 55 miles. It was fun, but I do need about another inch of seatpost height before I do that again.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4
    I'm an old guy too and looking to build my first dj bike. I've never ridden a bike with dj geometry so I'm not sure which way to go with a frame. I definitely want 26" wheels and front suspension fork. I'd like to buy a frame from a smaller company and have looked at Tonic Fabrications "Howie", Dobermanns "Pinsher", and Deity's "Cryptkeeper". I don't know if this is the proper place to post, but I'm looking for any advice? Am I looking in the right direction with these frames? Are there any others that I should be looking at? Thanks!!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by VCB3 View Post
    I'm an old guy too and looking to build my first dj bike. I've never ridden a bike with dj geometry so I'm not sure which way to go with a frame. I definitely want 26" wheels and front suspension fork. I'd like to buy a frame from a smaller company and have looked at Tonic Fabrications "Howie", Dobermanns "Pinsher", and Deity's "Cryptkeeper". I don't know if this is the proper place to post, but I'm looking for any advice? Am I looking in the right direction with these frames? Are there any others that I should be looking at? Thanks!!
    what do you normally ride? how tall are you. the typical size range in DJ bikes is measured in "actual" (not "effective") top tube lengths. top tube is measured from center of seat tube to center of head tube. the blackmarket mob, for example, came in 21.5", 22", 22.25", 22.5". so 21.5" is Small. 22" is Medium. And 22.5" is considered L.

    Tonic, Doberman, Deity, are all good. You could also check out the Transition Trail or Park.

    You'll want to get a fork with either 80mm or 100mm travel.
    The Manitou Circus Expert is getting good reviews.
    Manitou Circus Expert Fork '11 > Components > Forks > Suspension Forks | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Although Marzocchi DJ3 is probably the best deal:
    Marzocchi Dirt Jumper 3 Fork '12 > Components > Forks > Suspension Forks | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4
    I'm a big dude - 6'4 and 220#. I currently ride a Transition Bandit 29 with a Fox 34 140mm, XTR trail everything, mrp 2x chain guide, hope pro2 evo hubs/Stan's Flows/DT Swiss spokes, Easton carbon Haven bars, Kronolog dropper post and that's what I've been jumping. We don't have a DJ spot (yet), but I am a contractor and just happen to be building a house right next to mine and me and my son have used my skid steer to build a small set of jumps. These will have to go when the house is finished, but I am in charge of trail maintenance at our local XC trail and intend to build a pump/dj track there soon. I looked at the mob, but apparently they are not available and won't be for awhile. ToP is definitely an option.

    I have no idea about dj specifis parts either. Like what kind of hubs, bottom bracket, etc. etc. My local (1 hour away) BMX track has an MTB class and would like to play around racing there too.

    Thanks for your help cmc4130 - I've been reading your posts about pump tracks etc. for a long time.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    4
    ToP chainstays seem fairly long, but again I know nothing about dj geo #s. Head tube angles seem to be mostly in the 69 degree range on the frames I listed, but seat tube angles are from 71 - 73. I really don't know what kind of numbers to be looking for. And what about BB drop?? I'm assuming that the more drop there is the more stable the bike is, but I would guess it is harder to get the front wheel off the ground? I'd really like to learn to manual for days and seems like the shorter the stays the easier it would be?

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by VCB3 View Post
    ToP chainstays seem fairly long, but again I know nothing about dj geo #s. Head tube angles seem to be mostly in the 69 degree range on the frames I listed, but seat tube angles are from 71 - 73. I really don't know what kind of numbers to be looking for. And what about BB drop?? I'm assuming that the more drop there is the more stable the bike is, but I would guess it is harder to get the front wheel off the ground? I'd really like to learn to manual for days and seems like the shorter the stays the easier it would be?
    With your height, I think the Transition Trail or Park in the 23"tt length would be ideal. My buddy Brandon is your height (and heavier) and the bike fits him great. Part of why it fits better is not just the top tube length. It's also because Transition designed the bb to be a little lower around a taller fork (recommended 100mm fork), versus the Mob which (at least to me) has the feel of a taller bb, intended for a shorter fork. The end result is that on my 22.5" Mob, I ride 4" rise bmx bars with an 80mm fork, whereas Brandon rides 2" or 3" rise mtb bars with a 100mm fork and both bikes feel equally comfortable. When you're tall, I find that it helps to have a DJ frame where you feel a little more "in" the bike, rather than "above" it.

    About the back end on the TOP, I'm a little surprised the website says 15.75"-16.5", Transition Bikes because I'm pretty sure they used to quote it as 15.5"cs. But anyway, I run my back wheel at 15.75 on my Mob and I think it feels great. I "lock in" to manuals really well on it. Over on bmxmuseum, they were just talking about manuals, BMXmuseum.com Forums / The Art of Manuals, and I pointed out what I've found to be true.... is that bikes with super-short back ends, like new school 20"s, yes, the front end does pull up quicker, but it's actually harder to "lock in" on a manual like you can on a bmx race frame (or 24" bmx's, 26" mtbmx's). A manual on my Mob: manual, UT austin Video - Pinkbike

    Brandon's Transition (23"tt):

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by VCB3 View Post
    ToP chainstays seem fairly long, but again I know nothing about dj geo #s. Head tube angles seem to be mostly in the 69 degree range on the frames I listed, but seat tube angles are from 71 - 73. I really don't know what kind of numbers to be looking for. And what about BB drop?? I'm assuming that the more drop there is the more stable the bike is, but I would guess it is harder to get the front wheel off the ground? I'd really like to learn to manual for days and seems like the shorter the stays the easier it would be?
    you're correct that more bb drop makes the bike more stable but also makes it a little harder to pull the front wheel off the ground. however, don't let that stop you from getting it. i've locked into manuals really well on Brandon's TOP. which reminds me, my other buddy Daniel (who is about 6'1" 220) also got the 23"tt TOP and everyone who rides it likes it. it's very comfortable. that said, if you like a high bb and want a super short back end, there are definitely frames out there. like the new NS Capital. STOUT in Houston has also made a few custom frames like that.

    also, there are a couple Doberman frames on Austin craigslist right now.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3
    Hello Everyone, I am new in this forum. I wanted to share that I am looking to buy a new bike for my Dad, however they used to ride old style. I have an almost same concern like of VCB3, I want some sensible suggestion from all of you. So that I can gift a bike to my Dad on his birthday.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by peter5689 View Post
    Hello Everyone, I am new in this forum. I wanted to share that I am looking to buy a new bike for my Dad, however they used to ride old style. I have an almost same concern like of VCB3, I want some sensible suggestion from all of you. So that I can gift a bike to my Dad on his birthday.
    How old is your dad? Does he already have a bike? What kind of riding does he do?

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3
    Hi cmc4130, my dad is around 58 years old and has a keen interest in cycling. Yes, he does have a fixed gear bike which he bought from critical cycles a long time ago. Now, as his birthday is approaching, I want to gift him a new one with something special. He usually goes for ride on paved roads. He also rides it while going to work.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cmc4130's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by peter5689 View Post
    Hi cmc4130, my dad is around 58 years old and has a keen interest in cycling. Yes, he does have a fixed gear bike which he bought from critical cycles a long time ago. Now, as his birthday is approaching, I want to gift him a new one with something special. He usually goes for ride on paved roads. He also rides it while going to work.
    So, are you saying he'll be riding road and commuting on the new bike? Or are you getting him a new bike for a different type of riding, like trails?

    By fixed gear, maybe you mean "singlespeed"? (Fixed means a locked hub that can't coast like a unicycle or velodrome bike). Do you want to stick with singlespeed?

    If commuting is the goal, you may want to look at something like Fairdale Bikes. They are run by a former pro BMXer who got into road bikes after BMX injuries. Pretty high on the cool/stylish spectrum.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3
    Yes, singlespeed that exactly what I meant. He'll be commuting on the new bike at work.
    I would certainly prefer singlespeed for him. I saw bikes on fairdale bikes, the price is around $459 which is too costly for me as I have managed to deposit only $300 only as of now. Thanks for the suggestion.
    I think I'll have to figure out a way to get that or I will have to sustain to buy from the same where earlier my father did. Anyone who wants a cheap single speed bike like me can go to Cheap Fixed Gear Bicycles - Single Gear Fixies | Critical Cycles I hope it helps other also.
    Thank You cmc4130, I really appreciate your suggestion. I really like that bike but my pocket doesn't allow

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •