Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,312

    Zoch set up advice

    Seems like lots of you are on Zoch's and I wanted to discuss how you are setting them up.

    I have a new Z1 150 mm fork and am new to the longish travel thing.

    I set the spring up with proper Sag (30%), but have run the compression and rebound adjusters wide open. In my general riding, it is buttery plush, does tend to dive a bit under braking. I will bottom out several times per ride, but the bottoming is imperceptable..I only know it bottomed because of where the zip tie ends up.

    The question is: Should I be doing something with these fancy compression and rebound adjusters. I'm not launching off anything big, I basically need the fork to take rapid hits, keep the wheel in contact with the ground, and keep me comfortably in control.

    Seems like increasing rebound would affect the forks ability to respond quickly to a hit. I can see the need if you just fell 15 feet and didn't want to get bucked off, but for what I ride? Am I wrong here? I guess you could increase it some to prevent the wheel from bouncing upward after an impact.

    Also seems to me that increasing compression just leads to a harsher ride with the benefit of not as much dive when going off slow obstacles or under braking. Maybe increased compression would allow one to run a softer spring and still control bottom out.

    After messing around with it a bit just now, I am going to try about 15 clicks of rebound (going in from full open), and 7 clicks of compression (again from full open). I picked these settings by just going over a curb again and again, increasing rebound until it didn't "buck" after the hit, and compression so it just slowed things down a tad without getting too harsh. I noticed that the fork was harder to bottom with the increased compression as well. These settings have yet to be trail tested.

    Anyway: How do you go about setting and selecting your compression and rebound for your fork?

    I'm not even going to go in to oil level/weight adjustment at this time

  2. #2
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,466
    I have a z1 light. Rebound is between full open and 3 clicks away. Compression two clicks. I use a blend of oil that is less than 7.5 wt, but not 5. Somewhere in the middle.

    Air is set around 42 psi. It's a tad low, but allows more suppleness, then I balance it with the clicks of compression.

    Your best bet is getting advice on this exact fork.

  3. #3
    ... I guess you won't be
    Reputation: jokermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,938
    for general xc type stuff, you want your fork to rebound somewhat quickly, so it doesn't stay in it's compressed state on all those little xc type bumps.....keep your compression in the middle and try letting the fork rebound quicker w/ less rebound damping.....

    If you spring rate is set correctly [psi or coil] the compression damping setting is less important than proper rebound setting. But, it sounds like you are dialing in your fork using the curb test - this is only good for ballparking spring rate, since you won't really know if your fork is not rebounding fast enough since you aren't hitting another bump afterwards....

    then again, just set the sag, put the settings in the middle and just ride the dang thing....

  4. #4
    parts leftover
    Reputation: schlim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    I have a new Z1 150 mm fork and am new to the longish travel thing

    Anyway: How do you go about setting and selecting your compression and rebound for your fork?
    You've got the right idea. The nice thing about external rebound adjustment is that you can change it easily on the fly. I have an MX Comp fork on an old bike that has a little swizzle stick that you have to adjust the rebound with after decompressing the fork and pulling the cap. What I like about external adjustment is that you can stop the "chatter" of the fork on washboard, and still keep it active enough to not pack down. I just change it slowly while riding until I don't hear a chatter.

    If the fork is diving, you might want to think about adjusting your sag to 25% (37mm) and turning up the compression damping. The compression adjustment is going to work a bit like the pro pedal settings on a Fox rear shock. It'll keep things from bobbing too much.

    Basically, it's all trial and error and it takes awhile to get everything dialed in right. You've got a good start, but you'll need to test different settings on the trail, and not just the curb.

  5. #5
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,312
    Quote Originally Posted by schlim
    What I like about external adjustment is that you can stop the "chatter" of the fork on washboard, and still keep it active enough to not pack down. I just change it slowly while riding until I don't hear a chatter.
    Explain what you mean by chatter?

  6. #6
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,942
    when settin up 3 new forks last year i was clued into a excellent ball park setting. compress the fork with all yer weight, release it all at once, look for the point where the front tire lifts off the floor, dial a tad more rebound into it till this stops, yer pretty close.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  7. #7
    parts leftover
    Reputation: schlim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Explain what you mean by chatter?
    If the rebound is too fast (full open), you'll hear an audible "clunk" as it bounces back to full extension and hits the end of its travel. It's almost like the sound of a loose headset. Riding over many small bumps causes this sound to repeat fast multiple times and sounds like chatter.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    27,541
    If it was my fork, I'd set it up for max plushness (bump absorption). It would dive, because there are many trail situations where if you increased the compression, the bumps you want the fork to absorb are WITHIN the range of compression damping that you just increased, so it WILL ride harsher if you turn up the compression damping. The ONLY way to avoid dive and not have it impact the performance of the suspension is a linkage fork where the forces can not compress the fork due to the linkage design, or with some sort of "inertia valve", although the latter is somewhat questionable due to the fact that you can't have an "instant" blow off (movement of the inertial valve to allow compression for regular bumps).

    So, I tend to not worry about it too much. Again, if it was my fork, from what you said, here is what I'd do (for my weight); I'd change the oil to 5wt because I like the faster action better. I find that it's a lot harder to run "too little" rebound rather than "too much". Most people set their rebound at slow speeds and situations that are not indicitive of high speed rock gardens. Even what seems to be "not very much" rebound damping can be "way to much" at high speed through a nasty rock garden. Increase oil height on each side slightly, maybe half a cap-full on each side from what you've described, although going a full cap-full on each side wouldn't be bad either. If it gets too progressive then I usually drop a straw down and pinch it off to siphon a little oil out. If I'm doing drops I may want to see the fork get to within a few mms of max travel, but on a ride that doesn't include any drops I'd probably like to see it at least half an inch from max travel. I'd run the compression full open. I've yet to ride ANY fork where increasing the compression damping causes the suspension to perform better. It always just makes it more harsh. I find that around 5-7 clicks of rebound is plenty for me with the RC2 damper.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •