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  1. #1
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    Upper Porc Singletrack...found!

    Thanks to macrider and others on this board, Molly and I found the sweet singletrack above Porcupine Rim this weekend.

    A lot of the confusion over its location stems from the fact that shuttles will drop off riders in two different locations, depending on whether they're doing LPS (Lower Porc Singletrack) or UPS (Upper Porc Singletrack). They're just lower and upper sections of the same trail.

    If you want the lower section only, you go up Sand Flats Road as per usual, then keep going past the standard Porcupine Rim Trailhead. About 5-6 miles further you'll see the cattle guard that macrider mentioned. This is the LPS trailhead.

    If you want the Whole Enchilada (including UPS), the Coyote shuttle will take you south of town, then up La Sal Mountain Road and drop you off where it meets the Kokopelli Trail. Note that this is a completely different approach and does not use Sand Flats Road at all. You'll ride down the Kokopelli doubletrack a couple of miles until you see the UPS singletrack on the right. I put together a map to hopefully clear up some of the confusion (see below).

    Anyway, Molly and I decided to do this ride as a loop (no shuttle). We left the car at Lion Park on the north end of town, and pedaled up Sand Flats Rd. to the normal Porc Rim trailhead. This took about an hour and a half at a pretty casual pace. From there, we continued up Sand Flats. It got super steep in sections and the climbing seemed to go on forever. The scenery was top notch, though, with pinon trees and some cool sandstone towers. We passed the LPS trailhead and opted to keep going (hey, we've made it this far...).

    This next section was fairly flat until the left turn onto Kokopelli's Trail. Some very steep climbing got us well established into the next ecological zone up near 8000 feet, with aspens and ponderosa pines. Thankfully, the climbing eased off and we saw the UPS singletrack branching off to our left.

    I just have to say, this is some of the best trail I've ever ridden. Huge kudos to the trail designers and everyone who had a part in building it. It snakes through boulders and trees, crosses sections of slickrock, drops off ledges, and periodically takes you right to the cliff edge for stunning views of Castle Valley and the La Sals. We got to the first overlook and I spotted a huge elk antler 150 feet below.

    We took a few photos, but mostly we just enjoyed the ride. After a bit less than an hour and a half of superb singletrack, we emerged at the regular Porcupine Rim trail just below High Anxiety Viewpoint. We took an extended lunch break and then blasted all the way down to the river. This is, without a doubt, my favorite ride I have ever done.

    Turner content: my Flux rocked on this ride! This is also the first time Molly has ridden her Flux in Moab, and she kept up with me like she has never done before. She had a blast.

    bock
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  2. #2
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    what a cool post! between the clarified directions and the sweet pics, i was right back on the trail i loved so much. thanx for that bock and ms bock. additionally, i was lookin at the map and i can add that somewhere on the fire road climb up to high anxiety, theres a connection, or used to be, to lower porc. as i said before, i didnt ride it so i can only guess where it comes in but i can tell you it drops ya back in just where i remember it and the map shows, just a few hundred feet shy of HA. whats cool is i didnt know there were 3 pieces of the porc. what i had called upper porc in my other post in the other thread was acctually the lower section by name and what i called lower porc is just the normal trail we all know and love. thats assuming bocks map is properly labled and i have no reason to think its not. just thought i should clarify that i was previously mistaken in my naming of the diff parts of the trail.

    thanx again man, that was very cool!
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  3. #3
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    Yeah, I've been calling the piece (Lower Porc s/t) "Upper" - mistakenly - didn't realize there's a whole 'nother piece up higher - that I've never ridden! also cool to hear that "they" are working on completing s/t so that you don't have to do any road at all if you do Burro Down...exciting times out there...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    what a cool post! between the clarified directions and the sweet pics, i was right back on the trail i loved so much. thanx for that bock and ms bock. additionally, i was lookin at the map and i can add that somewhere on the fire road climb up to high anxiety, theres a connection, or used to be, to lower porc. as i said before, i didnt ride it so i can only guess where it comes in but i can tell you it drops ya back in just where i remember it and the map shows, just a few hundred feet shy of HA. whats cool is i didnt know there were 3 pieces of the porc. what i had called upper porc in my other post in the other thread was acctually the lower section by name and what i called lower porc is just the normal trail we all know and love. thats assuming bocks map is properly labled and i have no reason to think its not. just thought i should clarify that i was previously mistaken in my naming of the diff parts of the trail.

    thanx again man, that was very cool!
    Thanks for the props, cactus!

    I added the connector trail in green on the map below. I'm guessing what your buddy did was ride the first part of the Porcupine Rim climb, took this connector to Sand Flats Rd, and then did LPS. We thought about doing that (except we wanted to do UPS as well) but figured all the climbing and miles would be hard enough without adding to the difficulty with another couple miles of Porc Rim. Maybe next time (or maybe next time we'll just shuttle it)!

    Disclaimer: the names/labels on my map could be off. Anyway, it's based on what I gathered from talk on this forum and a Moab LBS. If anyone sees something that needs to be corrected, let me know.

    bock
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  5. #5
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    A sidenote on this ride. The temperature at UPS was 69 yesterday, while Moab was 89. A great summer ride would be to park at the Porcupine Rim trailhead, ride up Sand Flats and Kokopelli, do UPS and LPS to High Anxiety, and then finish by descending the initial "climb" of Porcupine Rim back to your car. This would make for a very enjoyable 2-3 hour ride.

    And for those who remember being blown away (as I was) the first time you crested the ridge at the High Anxiety viewpoint, you get similarly great views every few minutes all along the singletrack of UPS/LPS, since it sticks pretty close to the cliff edge. It's really quite amazing.

    bock

  6. #6
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    yep. id say thats just about right but my memory is like a flow through tea bag. thanx again. im gonna save this map for future reference if you dont mind.
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  7. #7
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    Where is Burro Down

    relative to UPS? I was last out there in 2003 and one of the locals talked about Burro Down being a pretty gnarly big-hit bike section "way up there". Don't know if I have the sack/skills for that but the rest of the UPS/LPS is interesting.

    I've only done the Unimog shuttle and then the jeep trail "climb" up to the viewpoint and down. That was fun. This looks more gooderer.

    Quote Originally Posted by macrider
    Yeah, I've been calling the piece (Lower Porc s/t) "Upper" - mistakenly - didn't realize there's a whole 'nother piece up higher - that I've never ridden! also cool to hear that "they" are working on completing s/t so that you don't have to do any road at all if you do Burro Down...exciting times out there...
    Professional Amateur. Disagree? Submit your grievances here.

  8. #8
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    damn Bock, you and your lady must be in great shape. That sounds like a very long day in the saddle. How much water did you carry anyway? Thanks for the map.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by shanedawg
    damn Bock, you and your lady must be in great shape. That sounds like a very long day in the saddle. How much water did you carry anyway? Thanks for the map.
    Thanks, yeah it was pretty long, about six hours. I had 100 oz. of water and didn't run out, but we had cloud cover and cooler temps up top. My main concern ahead of time was that I might be too tired at the end of the climb to enjoy the descent properly. Thankfully, that didn't happen and I was like a kid in a candy store on that looooong downhill...

    bock

  10. #10
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    geezus

    Well, the word has been out for years now, but I guess this is the final step in its coming out party. Colorful maps on the internet.

    UPS may be closed by the Forest Service. It's a poach job, and crosses an archeologically sensitive area. It is not legal. Hence, many locals will not dole out info about how to find it, though by Moab standards, it's easy to find.

    LPS is a more unclear issue. It is on BLM land, built on what has turned out to be an open travel area, so may indeed be easier to legalize than UPS.

    This is the kind of publicity that killed Hazard County version 1.0. That whole bit left the FS somewhat antagonistic towards user-created trails, which may carry over into the mandated fate of UPS.

    hfly
    Last edited by hfly; 10-18-2005 at 10:43 AM.

  11. #11
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    Thanks bock for the info and map, doubt I would climb up or bother driving up that far, that had to be 25+ miles of climbing to get to UPS, plus 4000ft of climbing or so?-ouch. Sign me up for the shuttle service

  12. #12
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    I rode UPS-LPS to Porc. on Saturday.
    Crowds of people at the Porc. overlook into Castle Valley.
    IMHO, UPS and LPS are much better trails than Porc. Rim. Despite a crash and the fact that I ride a Ventana, I still had fun.
    Nice pics and write-up.
    Craig, Durango CO
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hfly
    geezus

    Well, the word has been out for years now, but I guess this is the final step in its coming out party. Colorful maps on the internet.

    UPS may be closed by the Forest Service. It's a poach job, and crosses an archeologically sensitive area. It is not legal. Hence, many locals will not dole out info about how to find it, though by Moab standards, it's easy to find.

    LPS is a more unclear issue. It is on BLM land, built on what has turned out to be an open travel area, so may indeed be easier to legalize than UPS.

    This is the kind of publicity that killed Hazard County version 1.0. That whole bit left the FS somewhat antagonistic towards user-created trails, which may carry over into the mandated fate of UPS.

    hfly
    Hfly, if this is true, then Moab locals have their heads so far up their @sses when it comes to access issues that it is ridiculous.

    For one thing, local shops are doling out info on exactly how to find it, and shuttle companies have UPS on their regular schedule, for crying out loud!

    Let me ask you this: have you ever ridden UPS yourself? If so, did you know it was an illegal trail at the time? If so, then you are a big part of the problem, and I resent your statement that my map "is the kind of publicity that killed [some other Moab 'locals only' trail]". What do you expect?

    If you're going to build an illegal trail, people are going to find out about it and ride it (and hfly, I'm not saying that you built this trail; I have no idea if you did or not). If people are riding it, the land manager is going to find out about it sooner or later. Then if it gets closed, it gets closed. The land managers are then typically pissed off at mountain bikers and less willing to work with them on building new (legal) trails in the future. But the secret trail builders don't really care because they can always build new trails somewhere else and see how long they can keep them secret. The whole process repeats itself.

    It is this selfish, egotistical cycle that sickens me. And then locals have the gall to blame "outsiders" who share trail info with the unworthy. Give me a friggin' break.

    Now that I've got that off my chest, can you tell me how you know UPS is an illegal trail? Can you tell me why there is a FS kiosk/sign (with no info on it, though) at the trailhead?

    bock

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hfly
    Hence, many locals will not dole out info about how to find it, though by Moab standards, it's easy to find.
    Hfly, I'm sure it's tough to see the secret stash go to waste, particularly when the masses vacation at your front door, kind of like living at Mecca, but this information is readily available from the bike shops and the shuttle services, and I've never gotten the impression from any of them that it was secret, illegal and in any way, shape, or form a sensitive area. You may want to jump their shite, and Bock, regardless of how innocent your good intentions were, maybe you could remove the map if it's putting such a great trail in harms way. If it's too late to modify your original post Airwreck, the moderator, could remove it for you.

  15. #15
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    bock,

    It seems I came across as more antagonistic than I actually intended.

    I did not have anything to do with building LPS or UPS. They were built a year apart from each other by completely separate people.

    Neither you, nor your map, are the problem.

    Three years ago, the "Whole Enchilada" or "Burro Down" Epic (Burro Pass-->Hazard County-->Kokopelli-->UPS-->LPS-->Porcupine) was popularized both online and by local shuttle companies. I had my hand in the popularization process with a "Burro Down" picture post online that received like 10000 views on this site, so I am certainly not above reproach. Later that year, frustrated with the increased traffic on Hazard County, and the fact that it was poached into place, the Forest Service enforced the closure of Hazard, to the point of writing tickets for violators. UPS had escaped their purview at that time. The whole thing kind of died down for a few years. Shops would officially not tell people to ride illegal trails, and the shuttles backed off. This year, it seems that we're back to 2002: popularizing a trail in advance of its official sanction, and it seems that shops and shuttles have done their fair share. This is what shut Hazard down (though in fact it is now being rebuilt and should be open next summer) and now the risk is there for UPS. Indeed, UPS has some archeologic issues going on that could render it more difficult to pass NFS muster.

    I have no real stake in the fate on LPS or UPS as they are not in my usual riding territory, but it would be good for Moab if they were both made fully legal in the next few years in advance of the Forest Service or BLM closing them. What could close them is if either agency perceives they have gotten "out of control". For that reason my personal policy is to not tell people how to find them, but that's just me and no one appointed me the spokesman for Moab at large. You're right, once the word is out (and it already is), there is no retrieving it.

    BTW, congrads to you and Molly for pulling off that loop from town. That's a big climb and an energy depleting downhill. Next time you are in Moab drop me a line if you'd like to ride.

    hfly

  16. #16
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    Gotta

    give props to hfly. 3 years ago he graciously helped out myself and another MN flatlander in picking some trails to ride prior to FFTF.

    He mentioned BD/WE but we balked given that we had neither the skills nor the fitness to ride what he described up top.

    If I lived there I too would covet the local "secrets". Then again, Moab wouldn't exist as it is today without out of town riding enthusiasts. The relationship is symbiotic. I too am put off by the attitudes akin to "non-locals are locusts ruining my personal playground".

    If we didn't come there to ride these great trails a lot of the people spreading this negative vibe wouldn't be able to live there either because there would be no vacation money flowing through the local businesses that now employ them.

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  17. #17
    John Finch
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    New question here. Should Locals be Banned from MPS & LPS?

    Hey Brock I must say I have really enjoyed this post. As a history buff I have really enjoyed this thread. I have also enjoyed riding Burro to Hazard to Kokopelli to UPS to MPS to LPS to Porcupine Rim. Yes, there is really a section called MPS (Middle Porcupine Single Track). You rode it but you didn't know it.

    The MPS section starts were you cross under the powerlines (that drop off into Castle Valley) and ends at the second hunters camp ground before you ride out to the cattleguard where the original LPS starts. This is a somewhat short section but according to historical records was not part of the orginal UPS construction project.

    The original UPS trail ended up on the first hunters camping spot (near the powerlines dropping down into Castle Valley) and from there you rode out to Sand Flats Road where you hung a right and rode 3 miles down Sand Flats to the Porcupine Rim short cut over to the Porcupine Rim climb to the viewpoint.

    Apparently, back in the day before MPS and LPS were constructed there was a lot of dreaming going on about how nice it would be to have a well designed sustainable singletrack connection from the original end of UPS to the famous Porcupine Viewpoint.

    From what I have been able to find from my interviews with the locals they were worn out from building the UPS. They were estatic with the UPS, and all they wanted to do for a while was ride their new masterpiece. I must say I can't blame them, the UPS section is a blast.

    Therefore, even though the locals took a break from their trail building efforts apparently a group of non-locals who got to ride the UPS started a dream called MPS to LPS to the View Point on Porcupine Rim. As we all know life is about riding a dream trail like the UPS/MPS/LPS. If you like the UPS trail you should try the Damifino trail in Sedona.

    Well somtimes dreams turn into realities. My hope is that someday the Kokopelli to the Porcupine Rim Viewpoint via the UPS/MPS/LPS will someday be brought into the Moab legal system. Moab badly needs this trail. I am tired of riding screwed up Jeep roads, I think the 92 trails in Sedona are pretty cool.

    Unlike the Hazard County trail which was an environmental nightmare the new UPS/MPS/LPS trail is a totally sustainable trail. Once the new Hazard County section is completed, I believe the Burro to Hazard to Kokopelli to UPS to MPS to LPS to PRT will be one of the best trails to ride in the US. It is my dream to be able to do this ride with other people who would enjoy diong the same.

    Oh yes, since from what I have been able to find out about MPS and UPS it seems logical that ONLY NON-LOCALS ride the MPS/LPS section since they were the ones who put their dream into a reality.

    I am curious if the locals have dreams about any other trail ideas. Amassa Back Viewpoint to Pothole would be pretty cool.

  18. #18
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    I think y'all should heed hfly's discomfort, and edit your messages accordingly. that would be the proper gesture here.

    bock -- nice ride. thanks for the report. please consider what hfly has posted.

    Quote Originally Posted by hfly
    geezus

    Well, the word has been out for years now, but I guess this is the final step in its coming out party. Colorful maps on the internet.

    UPS may be closed by the Forest Service. It's a poach job, and crosses an archeologically sensitive area. It is not legal. Hence, many locals will not dole out info about how to find it, though by Moab standards, it's easy to find.

    LPS is a more unclear issue. It is on BLM land, built on what has turned out to be an open travel area, so may indeed be easier to legalize than UPS.

    This is the kind of publicity that killed Hazard County version 1.0. That whole bit left the FS somewhat antagonistic towards user-created trails, which may carry over into the mandated fate of UPS.

    hfly

  19. #19
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    Top of the World Killer Viewpoint to Onion Creek Road is a great little connection, but it does have one big vertical drop section. It's to die for..
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hfly
    This is what shut Hazard down (though in fact it is now being rebuilt and should be open next summer)

    By hook or crook, I'll be there...

    Awesome news.

    That's a model for trail systems, I sure wish we could get some stuff like that going on here. Hope everything goes well for the trails up there.
    Last edited by Jayem; 02-01-2006 at 04:53 PM.
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  21. #21
    John Finch
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by cutthroat
    Top of the World Killer Viewpoint to Onion Creek Road is a great little connection, but it does have one big vertical drop section. It's to die for..

    Andy at Moab Cyclery has told me that that area is really cool. I have yet to try it out since it's so far out there I have not tried it. How about the singletrack up to Gold Bar Rim from the bottom of Gemini Bridges?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bock
    Thanks to macrider and others on this board, Molly and I found the sweet singletrack above Porcupine Rim this weekend.

    A lot of the confusion over its location stems from the fact that shuttles will drop off riders in two different locations, depending on whether they're doing LPS (Lower Porc Singletrack) or UPS (Upper Porc Singletrack). They're just lower and upper sections of the same trail.

    If you want the lower section only, you go up Sand Flats Road as per usual, then keep going past the standard Porcupine Rim Trailhead. About 5-6 miles further you'll see the cattle guard that macrider mentioned. This is the LPS trailhead.

    If you want the Whole Enchilada (including UPS), the Coyote shuttle will take you south of town, then up La Sal Mountain Road and drop you off where it meets the Kokopelli Trail. Note that this is a completely different approach and does not use Sand Flats Road at all. You'll ride down the Kokopelli doubletrack a couple of miles until you see the UPS singletrack on the right. I put together a map to hopefully clear up some of the confusion (see below).

    Anyway, Molly and I decided to do this ride as a loop (no shuttle). We left the car at Lion Park on the north end of town, and pedaled up Sand Flats Rd. to the normal Porc Rim trailhead. This took about an hour and a half at a pretty casual pace. From there, we continued up Sand Flats. It got super steep in sections and the climbing seemed to go on forever. The scenery was top notch, though, with pinon trees and some cool sandstone towers. We passed the LPS trailhead and opted to keep going (hey, we've made it this far...).

    This next section was fairly flat until the left turn onto Kokopelli's Trail. Some very steep climbing got us well established into the next ecological zone up near 8000 feet, with aspens and ponderosa pines. Thankfully, the climbing eased off and we saw the UPS singletrack branching off to our left.

    I just have to say, this is some of the best trail I've ever ridden. Huge kudos to the trail designers and everyone who had a part in building it. It snakes through boulders and trees, crosses sections of slickrock, drops off ledges, and periodically takes you right to the cliff edge for stunning views of Castle Valley and the La Sals. We got to the first overlook and I spotted a huge elk antler 150 feet below.

    We took a few photos, but mostly we just enjoyed the ride. After a bit less than an hour and a half of superb singletrack, we emerged at the regular Porcupine Rim trail just below High Anxiety Viewpoint. We took an extended lunch break and then blasted all the way down to the river. This is, without a doubt, my favorite ride I have ever done.

    Turner content: my Flux rocked on this ride! This is also the first time Molly has ridden her Flux in Moab, and she kept up with me like she has never done before. She had a blast.

    bock
    What a great post...wish I'd seen this in 2004 before I made the "error" of taking Kokopelli after being dropped off at the cattle gate! Had a buddy with only about 30 oz of water and I about lost him at the overlook with many miles to go. I ride Porc every trip to Moab but haven't tried this extension...think I will in '06.

    Without reading all of the posts since October, where did you get the map? Great work.

  23. #23
    John Finch
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    Can you tell me why there is a FS kiosk/sign (with no info on it, though) at the trailhead?

    Bock:

    Legend has it that the sign post was originally put up by the UFS with a plastic sign stapled to it saying, "This is a really fun trail but it is illegal." (or something to that affect). My further understanding is that the sign blew off during a really windy period in
    Moab and to my knowledge it was never replaced.

    I was lucky enogh to ride the trail on one of those windy days where the wind was coming out of the south at 40 mph plus. It was an unbelievable ride with the wind to your back the whole way to the Porcupine Rim Trail exit on the river road.

    The down side it was a ***** riding back to town with that head wind.




    QUOTE=bock]Hfly, if this is true, then Moab locals have their heads so far up their @sses when it comes to access issues that it is ridiculous.

    For one thing, local shops are doling out info on exactly how to find it, and shuttle companies have UPS on their regular schedule, for crying out loud!

    Let me ask you this: have you ever ridden UPS yourself? If so, did you know it was an illegal trail at the time? If so, then you are a big part of the problem, and I resent your statement that my map "is the kind of publicity that killed [some other Moab 'locals only' trail]". What do you expect?

    If you're going to build an illegal trail, people are going to find out about it and ride it (and hfly, I'm not saying that you built this trail; I have no idea if you did or not). If people are riding it, the land manager is going to find out about it sooner or later. Then if it gets closed, it gets closed. The land managers are then typically pissed off at mountain bikers and less willing to work with them on building new (legal) trails in the future. But the secret trail builders don't really care because they can always build new trails somewhere else and see how long they can keep them secret. The whole process repeats itself.

    It is this selfish, egotistical cycle that sickens me. And then locals have the gall to blame "outsiders" who share trail info with the unworthy. Give me a friggin' break.

    Now that I've got that off my chest, can you tell me how you know UPS is an illegal trail? Can you tell me why there is a FS kiosk/sign (with no info on it, though) at the trailhead?

    bock[/QUOTE]

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