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  1. #1
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    Suspension Rate?

    Anyone know what the suspension rate is on the Burner?

    I'm trying to decide if I the Twin Tube version of the 3-way would be a good match for the Burner.

    From Manitou:
    A Twin Tube Canister version of the Swinger 3-way (for a more linear spring rate) is also available. Though this option adds 65g to the weight of the shock, it increases performance on bikes with low leverage ratios and inherently rising rates.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    Anyone know what the suspension rate is on the Burner?
    As you can see, the linkage is rising rate:



    The linkage rate seems to be 2.38:1 to me.

  3. #3
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    Talk about a definitive answer Thanks.
    Did you get that from Turner, or did take the measurements of your frame and plug in the numbers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    Talk about a definitive answer Thanks.
    Did you get that from Turner, or did take the measurements of your frame and plug in the numbers?
    The way the program works is, you get a decent picture, the one on the Tirner website with the dimensions on it was great, and transfer key points to the program. The progam then calculates everything for you

    If you're interessted, you can get the program at www.hegyezo.hu and check out my database of linkage files at www.zonoskar.com

    The blue line is the suspension rate, the red line shows if it's rising, falling rate or linear. Then in the top lefthand all sorts of numbers appear, which change as you mov ethe slider to compress the suspension. It's a really cool program. I compared the Burner against te 5 SPot, they are remarkably similar, wonder why

    I don't yet have a Turner bike, but I will in the near future. Still deciding on the color and size
    Last edited by zonoskar; 04-07-2004 at 01:13 PM.

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    Some nice work you're doing there. Thanks for the links.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zonoskar
    As you can see, the linkage is rising rate:



    The linkage rate seems to be 2.38:1 to me.
    I assume that the blue line shows rear axle travel, and the red line shows shock travel. If those are linear measurements (not measurements of rate), then the rate would be the rate of change of these linear measurements. So, for a design to be linear the red line would have to parallel the blue line. Since, in this chart, the red line starts to climb at at reducing rate, while the rear axle stays linear, wouldn't this technically be a slightly falling rate?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjcarr
    I assume that the blue line shows rear axle travel, and the red line shows shock travel.
    No, that's not right. The blue line plots the rear wheel travel against the shock travel, this is normally a very straight line. The red line shows the gradient of the blue line. This shows if the linkage is rising or falling rate. You can see that on teh Burner, this starts out as rising rate and the further the linkage gets to max travel, the rising rate becomes less.

    Interestingly, the Foes DHS has the most linear linkage I have modelled with this program (search in the database).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by zonoskar
    You can see that on teh Burner, this starts out as rising rate and the further the linkage gets to max travel, the rising rate becomes less.


    By gradient, do you mean differential? I.e. the red line is the differential of the equation that represents the blue line?

    hmmm... that doesnít make sense to me. If you differentiate a linear function, you get a constant...

    My maths is pretty rusty though.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    By gradient, do you mean differential? I.e. the red line is the differential of the equation that represents the blue line?
    Yup.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    hmmm... that doesn?t make sense to me. If you differentiate a linear function, you get a constant...
    That is correct. And that's what makes a linear suspension rate. For every mm the shock moves, the rear wheel moves X-mm. But almost no suspension design is linear.

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