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  1. #1
    Daniel the Dog
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    Spot is the best technical cross country frame I have ridden...

    First, I'm not a great technical rider. I have never have been. Today, I rode Hidden Valley at Syncline in the Columbia River Gorge. Usually I push 3 times on that ride. However, today I only pushed my bike once. My Spot just eats up technical terrain like it is nothing. I cleaned stuff and look back and just shook my head.

    I think the 5" of travel helps along with the coil shock. But, I think it is the perfect balance of this bike that gives me confidence along with a 69 degree angle head tube.

    I'm very happy with my purchase. I'm still no Hans Rey, but I'm closer then I was before this bike.

    Jaybo

  2. #2
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    One of us...one of us....one of us...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    First, I'm not a great technical rider. I have never have been. Today, I rode Hidden Valley at Syncline in the Columbia River Gorge. Usually I push 3 times on that ride. However, today I only pushed my bike once. My Spot just eats up technical terrain like it is nothing. I cleaned stuff and look back and just shook my head.
    welcome aboard "Jaybro"

    If I had half the legs this bike has. What really gets me is the times I come up on a techi section I hadn't seen befrore, have no idea how to attack it, and rather than hold back and think about a line, I just half close my eyes and keep pedaling only to find I cleared it and wondered what I was worried about...Sure that's pretty impressive decending...the thing is...I'm talking about the climbs.

    -When decending, drop 5 cogs and pedal like a jackass.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  3. #3
    Daniel the Dog
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    Pedal? Not where I ride....

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    welcome aboard "Jaybro"

    If I had half the legs this bike has. What really gets me is the times I come up on a techi section I hadn't seen befrore, have no idea how to attack it, and rather than hold back and think about a line, I just half close my eyes and keep pedaling only to find I cleared it and wondered what I was worried about...Sure that's pretty impressive decending...the thing is...I'm talking about the climbs.

    -When decending, drop 5 cogs and pedal like a jackass.
    It is more like get your tail behind the seat, bounce off rocks, and hope you don't fall off and break something. The ride I rode today had huge rocks on either side with rock drops along a cliff. It scares me to death. I love it! However, I hear you about this bikes' ability to climb on technical terrain.

    I have a guy I ride with who told me he would rather ride Syncline then Moab. But, I would love to ride Moab. It is just hard to get motivated to drive 18 hours when I have so much great riding here in the NW. I would also love to ride on the east coast. Whistler too.

    Jaybo

    PS when should I inject more grease into the frame? I'm a little freaked about pushing a zeek out accidently.
    Last edited by Jaybo; 03-20-2004 at 08:57 PM.

  4. #4
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    I find myself doing things on my 5 that I never thought I’d attempt. Particularly now that I’m 30-something, self-employed, and supporting a wife and three kids. Example, today I’m riding with a local rider who pedals a Yeti ASX and is very good at the whole hucker/freeride gig. He introduces me to this new section of trail and before you know it I’m actually attempting to keep up with the guy and doing fairly well. That is until I took a digger, still trying to nail the whole slow-speed-wheelie-drop-in move, off a fairly technical 4’ drop. Now I’m trying to decide whether I’m going to replace my broken helmet with a full face Giro Switchblade, my jaw is swore but not broken, and which knee/shin pads I’m going to buy. Ironically, the only body armor I own, elbow/forearm pads, where still in my Camelpak when I turfed it .

  5. #5
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    A little divergence is good...

    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    .... Now Iím trying to decide whether Iím going to replace my broken helmet with a full face Giro Switchblade, my jaw is swore but not broken, and which knee/shin pads Iím going to buy. Ironically, the only body armor I own, elbow/forearm pads, where still in my Camelpak when I turfed it .
    With a nick like that, I would have thought you were somewhat used to the whole biff scene.

    I go OTB a lot in the early season...90% of the time its because I'm being too careful and going too slow to roll a feature.

    I just ordered some Roach Rally pads...I HIGHLY recommend them. I tried the large and they fit very well, have excellent protection and are suprisingly light. My last pads were Azonic and felt like a Baseball Catcher's leggings wraped with 1/4 neopreme. They're 2X-3X as Heavy as the Roach pads, and very hot. Plus I could never get them to stay up.

    I find pads lend a great deal of confidece to the ride. Believe it or not they actually help my climbing, because I have an awful tendency to plant my knee squarely into my stem on sketchy climbs. When I don't have to worry about it I can focus on other things. While waiting for the Roaches I've been using my roller-blade knee pads. They actually do a very good job protecting me from my stem.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  6. #6
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    Tell me about it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    With a nick like that, I would have thought you were somewhat used to the whole biff scene.
    It used to be simply The Dog, but after a summer full of visits to the hospital, particularly the one followed by a few weeks of temporary amnesia , Crash was added. But that was over eight years ago and didn't involve dropping, hucking, or anything vaguely familiar to what I'm attempting on my 5 Spot. Thanks for the recommendation on the Roach Rally's I'll have to look into them.

    Hey, Zilla check your PM...
    Last edited by CrashTheDOG; 03-21-2004 at 03:27 PM.

  7. #7
    Baked Alaskan
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    funny, I had the same reaction

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    First, I'm not a great technical rider. I have never have been. Today, I rode Hidden Valley at Syncline in the Columbia River Gorge. Usually I push 3 times on that ride. However, today I only pushed my bike once. My Spot just eats up technical terrain like it is nothing. I cleaned stuff and look back and just shook my head.
    When I first got mine, it blew me away with the stuff I cleared, things I had never cleared before I was chewing up on the very first ride. Funny thing is, some said it was BS and now they're riding 5-spots. Go figure.

    I'm a terrible technical rider, but what I've found with the 5 is just sit and hammer and the bike will do the rest. The Mav fork only adds to that ability, as does the fat tires I run.

  8. #8
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    New question here. 4 foot drops with 5 Spot

    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    I find myself doing things on my 5 that I never thought Iíd attempt. Particularly now that Iím 30-something, self-employed, and supporting a wife and three kids.
    Me too - no wife and three kids - just a cat.

    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    ...trying to nail the whole slow-speed-wheelie-drop-in move, off a fairly technical 4í drop. .
    4 foot drop? How much do you weigh? I've been drooling over the 5 Spot, but wondering if I need longer travel. I thrive on long technical rocky trails (that's all we have here) but the opportunity for 3' to 4' drops are numerous, and I'm finding myself drawn more and more to this light free-ride stuff.

    Most of my friends ride 7"-8" travel frames in the 45lb range (and huck 10 footer like I do 2 fotters) but I'm much more of a trail rider than they - #1 for me is tech trail and I don't really want to push a 7" travel bike around.

    So if the 5 Spot can handle 4' drops with a 165lb rider, weeeeeheee!

    What do you think?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Chris
    I'm a terrible technical rider, but what I've found with the 5 is just sit and hammer and the bike will do the rest.
    Amen! I don't remember where I read the analogy but someone likened the 5's ability to climb to a chair lift. While in Moab last weekend I cleared a section on Porcupine that I've never been able to, and even on the first try at that!


    Quote Originally Posted by Rollin'in'Zona
    4 foot drop? How much do you weigh?...
    So if the 5 Spot can handle 4' drops with a 165lb rider, weeeeeheee!
    I just reread my previous post and I mistakenly made it sound as though I'm out there riding like Bender. My style isn't to look for drops. Ask Tscheezy, heíll testify my technical skills leave a lot to be desired. It's just that the 5 has opened that door and made me feel like it's possible, hence the moronic decision to launch a drop well beyond my abilities.

    Whether the 5 Spot could handle the repetitive abuse of such riding I'm not sure, but I believe that the common consensus in the Turner forum is that if you're planning on dropping/hucking/freeriding then the RFX or the likes is your best bet.

  10. #10
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    perfect exploring bike

    After riding the bike several times now on familiar downhills, I know it's definately an improvement on my old bike, but I have to agree that the 5 Spot really shines on the uphills.

    A lot of my rding friends have been getting really lazy, increasingly just shuttling up the hills with heavy downhill bikes on the back of the car, and spending more of the day co-ordinating lifts and pick up points that actually riding. The big bikes so often become anchors.

    The 5 Spot totally leaves them behind on the uphills and in many cases with my regular riding friends I'm getting down the hill either with them or ahead of them.

    I was sold on the Spot when I read reviews that said the 5 Spot was the ultimate back country explorer, and suited for those who just want to get out and ride. I plan to do a lot of exploring of long, often tricky, never-know-what's-round-the-corner forested ridgelines in the next few months. A lot of those tracks have possibly never been done on a bike before and I know the Spot is going to be perfect for the job.

  11. #11
    BSG
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    5-footers

    I know its been said but its not all about the size of the jump. If your generaly smooth in the air. I think the spot can handle a five footer. I jumped plenty on my RM Instict and never had a problem. If your landing hard, 3 footer will eventually take its tole on the frame.
    BSG

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