Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Rohloff

  1. #1
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480

    Rohloff

    Anyone ridden one and like or dislike it? I've seen a couple outfit their bikes with one, some changing them out for a conventional drivetrain later.

    I've always been intrigued by them, but saw them as a bit finicky with frames not designed for their use, some complained about shifting or "this wasn't for me", weight. Don't know how much weight is being held by this, but I always thought a sealed gearbox, a bmx chain, and one chainring is a great setup, even though costs will never be made back in under a decade.

    I am fully aware of a persisting thread on another board here. I didn't want to hear more of the same from them. I wanted to hear from my peers who are the same people using the same frames I am.

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,365
    I've had one on my 5-Spot for a month now. It is laced into a Large Marge rim for Barny's Snaux Turner, so keeping in mind that I have a 1000g rim on there...

    It's a mixed bag. But I mostly don't care for the thing. I'm glad I only paid about $300 for it, almost new. The higher gears (8-14) are very smooth and life is pretty good. The lower gears are very "grindy" and you feel like you are powering the entire Munich town square Glockenspiel. This effect apparently diminishes with wear. A thousand miles later it is supposedly smoother. I have about 100 miles on it and one oil change.

    The transition from gear 7 to 8 is also super annoying because it totally changes planetary gear systems and you transit through gear 14 (or something) for a moment. If you don't recognize what is happening instantly and let off the pedals to allow it to finish the move through that high gear, you are stuck in that gear. It is surprising how often you move between 7 and 8 and pass through this high gear as a result too, and I have been bogged down to the point of stopping on climbs a few times. You get pretty gunshy of this and learn to shift with almost no power on the pedals (as if you were shifting front chainrings everytime). My Sram stuff is more precise and I don't have to let up on the pedals as much as with the Rohloff.

    The wheel is freakishly heavy. Not just because I have a outrageous rim on there.

    The cables are a nasty clutter even for a Gravity Dropper devotee.

    I hate gripshift, and the shifter is basically a version of that.

    I can't see wearing out fewer chains or chainrings unless you went to a stainless chainring or something. You woud just be able to stop buying cassettes. Big deal.

    The good news? Well, you can run a ridiculously large rim and tire on your 6-Pack rear triangle with no tire/chain rub issues. It opens the possibility of making your Turner into a snowbike. Beyond that, I wouldn't bother.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,010
    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    I've had one on my 5-Spot for a month now. It is laced into a Large Marge rim for Barny's Snaux Turner, so keeping in mind that I have a 1000g rim on there...

    It's a mixed bag. But I mostly don't care for the thing. I'm glad I only paid about $300 for it, almost new. The higher gears (8-14) are very smooth and life is pretty good. The lower gears are very "grindy" and you feel like you are powering the entire Munich town square Glockenspiel. This effect apparently diminishes with wear. A thousand miles later it is supposedly smoother. I have about 100 miles on it and one oil change.

    The transition from gear 7 to 8 is also super annoying because it totally changes planetary gear systems and you transit through gear 14 (or something) for a moment. If you don't recognize what is happening instantly and let off the pedals to allow it to finish the move through that high gear, you are stuck in that gear. It is surprising how often you move between 7 and 8 and pass through this high gear as a result too, and I have been bogged down to the point of stopping on climbs a few times. You get pretty gunshy of this and learn to shift with almost no power on the pedals (as if you were shifting front chainrings everytime). My Sram stuff is more precise and I don't have to let up on the pedals as much as with the Rohloff.

    The wheel is freakishly heavy. Not just because I have a outrageous rim on there.

    The cables are a nasty clutter even for a Gravity Dropper devotee.

    I hate gripshift, and the shifter is basically a version of that.

    I can't see wearing out fewer chains or chainrings unless you went to a stainless chainring or something. You woud just be able to stop buying cassettes. Big deal.

    The good news? Well, you can run a ridiculously large rim and tire on your 6-Pack rear triangle with no tire/chain rub issues. It opens the possibility of making your Turner into a snowbike. Beyond that, I wouldn't bother.
    'bout describes why I haven't gone to one, despite blowing up der's ALL the time on my Free - South Mountain in Phoenix just killed another this last weekend - actually, SOMO killed 3-4 this weekend in the group - SOMEBODY needs to come up with a simple der in a box that sits mid-frame, because for freeriding, this whole replacing der's all the time is getting old....

    oh, and the insane cost for all the crap to make the thing work - all the parts you have to use etc.

  4. #4
    Steep Hill
    Reputation: AZClydesdale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,486

    I took the leap and I am 100% satisfied...

    I've put about 500 miles on the Rohloff 500/14.

    As a former drive train destroyer, positives of Rohloff far exceed the negatives. Shifting was and still is spot-on ever since coming out of the box. The ability to shift without pedaling is huge and has come in very handy. Carrying extra weight is not a problem for me but the weight of the hub does throw off bike balance a bit. There is no maintenance once installed, just wipe down the chain before a ride and go. If you are tired of messing with derrailuers or just want a more reliable maintenance free drivetrain, then I strongly recommend Rohloff.

    I like the twist shift fine, but I've heard Rohloff is coming out with a trigger shifter. That is unconfirmed.

  5. #5
    Knomer
    Reputation: Dusty Bottoms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,319
    1. grip shift - eeeew.

    2. new rotor - eeeeeeew.

    3. speedbone? - Ha, what the hell is that?

    4. no 150mm spacing - dumb.

    5. You still have to hang a component that looks suspiciously similar to a derailleur on a full squish, so what's the point? If that part gets smashed you're SOL again.

    No thanks.
    Global Director of Sales: Knolly Bikes

  6. #6
    Steep Hill
    Reputation: AZClydesdale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,486
    FS with a concentric bottom bracket does not require a speedbone to run Rohloff. I have a 5"/5" Zinn 29er free of any tensioner. Ventana, Zinn, Lenz and other manufacturers can get around the speedbone.

  7. #7
    Pixie Dust Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,302
    I know a couple of guys that are running Rohloffs on their FS rigs (not Turners) and their bikes have a nasty habit of cracking at/near the non-drive side dropout. Something about extra torque on the Rohloff creating problems if the rear end is not beefy enough. Probably a non-issue on a Turner rear end, but something to consider.

  8. #8
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9,145
    Quote Originally Posted by AZClydesdale
    As a former drive train destroyer, positives of Rohloff far exceed the negatives.
    I think the OP made it clear he only wants to hear the opinion of Turner homers, and particularly from those who don't like Speedhubs. So bug off! (eh... no offense, Tscheezy!)

    But seriously, the Speedhub performance doesn't magically change when attached to a Turner, versus any other brand.

    Tscheezy's weight and twist-shift complaints are a given. However, total bike weight is still within 1.5 pounds of an XT/disc setup, and a trigger shifter would never be able to change through all 14 gears in one instantaneous press of the thumb.

    J_C, as for costs, it's one thing if you're "upgrading" from a worn out derailleur drivetrain. It's an entirely different matter if starting from scratch, or parting out a brand new bike with an XT or better drivetrain. And like Tscheezy and his $300 kit, or my recent $350 score on eBay, deals abound. A last point on cost: they hold their value. A Speedhub wheelset I bought for $550 in '03 I just sold on eBay for $1075. A few less cassettes, chainrings and chains and they really do begin to pay their way after not too long.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  9. #9
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    I greatly appreciate the Turner-specific and non-specific views presented I don't believe I was receiving elsewhere. Sometimes one has to simply ask for the people who have not had a good experience to explain why because the lovers aren't saying it, for sure.

    The reason I posted in this manner is because i'm still in the learning phase about this product, I wanted to know about the things I wouldn't even think to ask, which was addressed as structural issues, as well as shift technique issues. I'm not going to assume that the Turner rear end is the end all of all rear ends and can automatically handle the loads a Rohloff would place on it. It would certainly suck to break a stay on a ride.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    4,282
    I gotta believe that Shimano and/or SRAM are getting close to releasing a Rohloff-like hub into the mtb marketplace. At least, I'm hoping, since the speed of evolution on the Rohloff has been painfully slow, to say the least. In the meantime, though we've apparently run CF and his Nicolai out of this forum on rails, I've got to say that Nicolai has a pretty cool gearbox bike in their line, which puts that heavy hub right in the middle of the frame where it belongs . Check out their website (link thoughtfully not provided, but ez enough to find).
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  11. #11
    Neg reppers r my biatches
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,240
    the only good part about them is how heavy they are

  12. #12
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9,145
    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo
    ...the speed of evolution on the Rohloff has been painfully slow, to say the least
    True, dat!

    Some perspective: Since the Speedhub's introduction in 1999, Rohloff has only produced 80,000 units.

    They only hit the 30K production mark in 2004.

    That puts them at an average of 6,000 units per year for the first 5 years, but closer to 25,000 these past two years.

    Point being, they were nuts for ever bringing this thing to market in the first place. Any fiscally responsible corporation wouldn't have launched this venture, and given the production costs, I doubt Shimano or Sram will change their minds unless they can build something for significantly less money.

    It's no shock that Rohloff's 1-pound lighter version is expected to jack prices another 10-15%.

    Gear hubs are a perfect demonstration of the strong-light-cheap axiom.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  13. #13
    AW_
    AW_ is offline
    locked - time out
    Reputation: AW_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,443
    Quote Originally Posted by macrider
    'blowing up der's ALL the time on my Free
    Just curious have you tried a Saint RD?

  14. #14
    ravingbikefiend
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,324
    If Shimano and SRAM do decide to go head to head with Rohloff and offer a 14 speed IGH I'd expect that one of them will come up with a bombproof unit (probably SRAM) that comes in at a lighter weight and way less money.

    They've been making IGH's for a long time although their current lineups of IGH's are better suited for road and touring applications.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  15. #15
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    True, dat!

    Some perspective: Since the Speedhub's introduction in 1999, Rohloff has only produced 80,000 units.

    They only hit the 30K production mark in 2004.

    That puts them at an average of 6,000 units per year for the first 5 years, but closer to 25,000 these past two years.

    Point being, they were nuts for ever bringing this thing to market in the first place. Any fiscally responsible corporation wouldn't have launched this venture, and given the production costs, I doubt Shimano or Sram will change their minds unless they can build something for significantly less money.

    It's no shock that Rohloff's 1-pound lighter version is expected to jack prices another 10-15%.

    Gear hubs are a perfect demonstration of the strong-light-cheap axiom.

    I won't believe the lighter version will be made until I see them because I've sent them several messages trying to find out about it and apparently, Rohloff doesn't deem it necessary to help out a customer with an interest in an $1100+ drivetrain replacement item.

    And I don't see how the Rohloff is exemplifying the bonty axiom because it's expensive, period. By the time it's paid for, technology will have surpassed it. The benefits aren't with the pricing.

  16. #16
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9,145
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    The benefits aren't with the pricing.
    Sounds like your mind is made up already, but truly, benefit is in the eye of the user. Hence the strong opinions on both sides of the fence.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  17. #17
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Read my posts closer. This thread wouldn't be here if I had my mind made up. There's hidden benefits I can't fathom, while there were problems I likewise couldn't.

    Both sides helps in making choices, not only the fanboy side. I posted here because in the Rohloff lover's thread, I knew I wouldn't get anyone speaking objectively.

  18. #18
    On MTBR hiatus :(
    Reputation: Speedub.Nate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9,145
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Both sides helps in making choices, not only the fanboy side. I posted here because in the Rohloff lover's thread, I knew I wouldn't get anyone speaking objectively.
    Objectively, it's damn reliable, it weighs what it weighs and it costs what you pay for it.

    The hub's benefit and "worth" is defined by the subjective experience of the user, just like most everything else we ride.

    I'll take the hint now and bow out of this thread.

    Hopefully objective Turner owners will continue to chime in.
    speedub.nate
    MTBR Hiatus UFN

  19. #19
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,365
    I would be interested in a lighter version with a trigger, but then again I am far from "unhappy" with derailleurs where I live. We rarely break stuff, no chain suck, add a little lube every two or three rides, replace some parts once or twice a year, and life is pretty good. I do love to try new stuff though, but at $1,000 for a retail unit I hardly consider a Rohloff hub an "experiment". It's more like an investment. So far I don't think it's worth the cheddar, but I understand it is a long-term relationship thing and I will keep grinding away on it to see what the future brings. Who knows, I may end up liking it. I'll try to keep an open mind...
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    17

    freeride hubs

    how bout' "freeride hubs" www.freeridehubs.com" a freeride version of the rohloffs?..
    ive considered these for a while now but between the $ and the weight,ive always chose to stick with a standard setup as well.....ow ya,Ive never introduced myself...whats up everyone!....im a lurker...always reading,always lurking.I LOVE my Turners (thanks Dave),
    decided to stay quiet for a while until i figured out whats going on here,but now you are all screwed as I may choose to interject my opinions/thoughts/photos without warning....
    -M

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fat Elvis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    943
    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    Gear hubs are a perfect demonstration of the strong-light-cheap axiom.
    Uh, what's that axiom? Strong-light-cheap, pick one?

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,010
    Quote Originally Posted by MagicMike
    how bout' "freeride hubs" www.freeridehubs.com" a freeride version of the rohloffs?..
    ive considered these for a while now but between the $ and the weight,ive always chose to stick with a standard setup as well.....ow ya,Ive never introduced myself...whats up everyone!....im a lurker...always reading,always lurking.I LOVE my Turners (thanks Dave),
    decided to stay quiet for a while until i figured out whats going on here,but now you are all screwed as I may choose to interject my opinions/thoughts/photos without warning....
    -M
    HAHA - yeah, Freeridehubs.com makes the Rohloff sound even better...

    "We no longer support Rohloff USA and Rohloff Germany due to multiple counts of intentional criminal fraud committed against our company in 2004."

    very encouraging...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •