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  1. #1
    Living the Dream
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    Roadie Question--Tons of Flats on Rear Tire

    Hi, I got a new road bike for XMAS. I have Mavic Ksyrium SL wheels with Specialized Mondo tires. I am getting a ridiculous amount of pinch flats on the rear tire. I have rim tape and run 120 psi. Any suggestions or hints as to what the problem might be.

    Thanks,
    John
    "And I shout that your all fakes and you should have seen the look on your face"

  2. #2
    the train keeps rollin
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    avoid square edge hits, get a meatier tire.
    beaver hunt

  3. #3
    what...?
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    How much do you weigh and what size tire?

    120psi - to me - sounds really high. use this to adjust accordingly: http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/TireDrop.pdf

    I use 25cm Conti Grand Prix 4 seasons. Tough as nails and allows me to use a bit less pressure for a nice, comfy ride.
    Without love in a dream it will never come true

  4. #4
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    go tubless,run stan's liquid

  5. #5
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    You haven't mentioned tire size, but I can assume it is the stock 23c. That is a relatively narrow tire, it is also light weight. Just like the MTB world there are correct tires for every application. So bumping up to a 25c touring or all purpose tire will likely solve the problems. It will weight the wheels by an extra 100-150g/wheel, but IME it is better than sitting on the side of the road in lycra wrestling to change a flat

    You could try a thorn tube, but I don't know that I have seen them smaller than 28c. So stuffing it into a 23c may be impossible.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  6. #6
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    Old rodie chiming in here. first off 120 PSI is not high, most modern road tires ( a good quality 700C tire) can handle even 140 PSI.

    First thing I would suggest to you is try installing the tire like this, first off use plenty of baby powder (this goes for mountain tires / tubes also) baby powder will allow the tire tube to move around to where it is relaxed and not be bunched up. I sprinkle a bunch in side the tire and roll it around, use your fingers and wipe it all over the inside. I will also put the tube in a Ziplock back with B.P. and shake it around. after you have one of the tire beads mounted on the rim. inflate the tube JUST ENOUGH to hold a round shape, tuck it into the tire rim area so that it sits where it should. start installing the other bead onto the rim without tire iron if possible. this is the number one place people will give a road tube a flat, if you do have to use a tire iron make sure it is in just far enough to grab the edge of the bead. you can watch the tube and see it is staying down inside the tire as you bead it.

    What size tire are you using, how much do you weigh? are you hitting any real bad pot holes or sharp edges that jar you?

  7. #7
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    I'm with snowdrifter... You have to watch where you're going. Even the pavement cracks, when hit at right angles, without unloading the bike, is enough to cause pinch flats... Bunnyhop them (and if you're riding with a pack, they should be pointing out hazards anyway)...

  8. #8
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpenglow
    Hi, I got a new road bike for XMAS. I have Mavic Ksyrium SL wheels with Specialized Mondo tires. I am getting a ridiculous amount of pinch flats on the rear tire. I have rim tape and run 120 psi. Any suggestions or hints as to what the problem might be
    Yeah. You're either riding your road bike on the wrong terrain or riding it too hard. It's supposed to be ridden on pavement and unless you don't care about true wheels, you are trying to keep the rubber down and rarely, if ever, get air. So if you are hucking off curbs, you are using the wrong tool for the wrong job. Bunny hops are to be done gently and only a few inches up, to get you over a pot hole, railroad tracks and such. Pinch flats can only happen if you hit obstacles like that and land too hard. That's rider error, not a tire/tube problem.

    The more typical road flat is a puncture caused by road debris - glass, sharp stones, nails, etc. It is crucial to make sure that whatever came through the tire to pop your tube is thoroughly removed and cleaned off before you mount another. If the hole is large, or the sidewall is damaged, tire boots are essential because the high pressure and heat caused by friction will cause the next flat in a jiffy.

    Hint: Two flats on one ride is rare, and a potential disaster, because few roadies carry more than one spare. A patch kit is bulky and a pain to use. Solution: superglue. A drop or two will permanently seal anything the road (or off-road for that matter) can throw at your tube - even a blowout, or your snakebite pinch flat. Word.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  9. #9
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    i'd lower your psi to 100 and check your rims for spokes that could be poking the tube.

  10. #10
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    Specialized Armadillo Elites All condition tires.

    50-60 each and you will go months without touching a tube, not to mention they last a VERY long time.

    I had about 2500 miles on the rear and the only reason I had to replace it was because I hit some sort of edge or metal going fast and it bent my rim, and slashed the tire. Was able to ride the tire with the slash for a good 4-5 months afterwards 'til I had to switch two tubes in one ride.

    I also go through gravel pits, mulch without any worries whatsoever. Although this is on my fixed gear bike with deep V rims. So I don't worry as much about the wheels.

    Great traction in the wet as well.


    Another cost effect effective tire I hear that takes a beating is the Vittoria Randonneur, that comes in a 25c size. They're about 20-25 bucks each, I will be trying that next.
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  11. #11
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    I assume you double checked the rim strip is properly installed? If they are slighly off or worn it can cause flats. As for PSI 120 should be fine. Go too low and you'll get more flats.

  12. #12
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    Check the reviews - Mondo's are renowned for getting flats. ALso check that there is no damage to the tire or rim that is causing repeated damage.

    Mich Pro 3 or Schwalbe Ultremo DD or Conti GP4000 for great puncture protection

  13. #13
    Living the Dream
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    Thanks guys.

    I picked up some Conti Grand Prix 25c's today. I weight 170lbs and ride on a smooth Washington DC bike path. I will follow the baby powder advice and hope that the wider tires help.

    Thanks Again!
    "And I shout that your all fakes and you should have seen the look on your face"

  14. #14
    It ain't easy being Green
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    Dude! Don't get wider/beefier tires!! The guys who have been pointing you towards checking the rim strip are likely correct, it sounds like you have a spoke end or a sharp eyelet poking the tube.

    Stock bikes are supplies with POS rim tape; you should discard it and buy cloth rim tape from your LBS, this will solve the problem and last for years.

    Tires: I like Vittoria Rubino Pro, treaded in Spring/Fall and slick in summer.

    PSI sounds good, 120 is a generally accepted standard.

    Don't listen to these damn MTB'ers, what do they know about road riding?

  15. #15
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    Rim strips are not needed on that wheel since the rim wall is not pierced (it looks a lot like an XM823 inside). Maybe the rim strip is taking up room you can't spare and contributing to the flats? Also, the Mondo's suck. They split and slice easily.


  16. #16
    Bodhisattva
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    My roadie tire of choice is the Schwalbe Ultremo DD - light and reinforced for flat resistance.

    Specialized armadillo tires are heavy - useful when roads are bad, but you will feel the weight.

    120 psi is fine

    23cc tires for me, and everyone I ride with around here - which includes some big dudes.
    “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

    ― Albert Einstein

  17. #17
    JMH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpenglow
    I picked up some Conti Grand Prix 25c's today. I weight 170lbs and ride on a smooth Washington DC bike path. I will follow the baby powder advice and hope that the wider tires help.

    Thanks Again!
    Yah, we weigh the same and you shouldn't typically be getting pinch flats at 120psi. I usually run 110 in the rear, and that's DEFINITELY enough in a 25c tire.

    All signs point to rim strips and/or your old tires.

    Roll on!

  18. #18
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    I agree with Clyde. Do a search for those wheels. My recollection is that Mavic does not recommend rim tape with the Ksyriums because thespokes don't go through the wall. I am running the elites and have never needed tape.

  19. #19
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    Been running Conti GP 4000s tires for 600ish miles miles on winter roads with no issues. I'm 180 and run 110 psi....no higher than 115. check your rim for sharp areas and if you have a rimstrip, you may want to replace them.

    Another thing to do is wipe your tires down with a wet cloth or paper towel. Then check for stuff lodged in your tire tread and remove. I just pulled out a metal sliver of some sort and a couple pf pieces of what looked like road salt/mag chloride.

  20. #20
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    This could well turn into an argument about tyre pressures and then gear ratios..

    I personally find running less pressure is actually faster and research shows this also, but experiment yourself. You certainly should not be getting pinch punctures at that pressure and you can go much lower that that safely.

    Are you sure it's pinch punctures you're getting? They are actually very rare with road biking, even with thin race tyres. It could be you have something stuck in the tyre, or as people are saying, the rim tape isn't correctly installed.

    Mounting road tyres is a lot more tricky that mountain bike tyres and you have to be very careful you don't trap the tube.

    Let us know how you are getting on with the new tyres..

  21. #21
    dwt
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    Does the OP and everyone else understand the difference between a "pinch flat" and a "puncture"?

    OP complained of "pinch flats." Most of the responses concern punctures.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  22. #22
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    avoid those small sections of singletrack along the bike path ; )

  23. #23
    jrm
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    Add air to the tube B4 installing it

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpenglow
    Hi, I got a new road bike for XMAS. I have Mavic Ksyrium SL wheels with Specialized Mondo tires. I am getting a ridiculous amount of pinch flats on the rear tire. I have rim tape and run 120 psi. Any suggestions or hints as to what the problem might be.

    Thanks,
    John
    And then massage the tire a you air it up.

  24. #24
    Bodhisattva
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    Go tubular. Pinch flat problem solved
    “Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

    ― Albert Einstein

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Squeaky Wheel
    Go tubular. Pinch flat problem solved
    Yes. Even easier, just grab a new wheel from the support car...

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