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  1. #1
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    quick fit question

    Is raising the A2C on an adjustable fork the same as raising the handlebars as far as fit is concerned? How about getting higher rise handlebars? Is that the same as raising the A2C on an adjustable fork?

    IB

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoBiker
    Is raising the A2C on an adjustable fork the same as raising the handlebars as far as fit is concerned?
    No.
    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoBiker
    How about getting higher rise handlebars? Is that the same as raising the A2C on an adjustable fork?

    IB
    No. Raising the a-c changes the height of the handlebars, the head angle, the seat tube angle, the bb height, etc.

    If you like the way the bike currently handles and you want to change your hand position, then using different risers, spacers and stems is the way to go.

  3. #3
    Lay off the Levers
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    No, the two changes have quite a different effect.

    Raising the handlebars only adds height to the place you reach to.
    Raising the A2C on the fork increases the base of your head tube, pitches the bike back, slackens the head-tube angle, the seat-tube angle, and slows the steering, depending on how much a2c you add.

    You'll have to turn your handlebars sooner and more to make the same turns, but you'll have more stability decending and find it easier to hold a line on flat or decending ground. You may find the bike wanders some or wheelies a bit more on very steep climbs. This is of course totally dependant on how much A2C you add.

    Raising the bars will help you sit more upright and give you a better view of the trail. It will give you better leverage to lift the wheel over obsticals and take some weight off the front for better balance. This could reduce pushing (front wheel washout) in corners if you had too much weight up front before. This could also increase the problem if you had too little to begin with. You can also shift too much weight backwards and impact your climbing, but not as quickly as you would if you raised the A2C.

    What are you trying to accomplish?
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  4. #4
    Just another FOC'er
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoBiker
    Is raising the A2C on an adjustable fork the same as raising the handlebars as far as fit is concerned? How about getting higher rise handlebars? Is that the same as raising the A2C on an adjustable fork?

    IB
    Changing the bars & stem changes the fit of the bike.

    Changing the A2C changes the geometry and handling of the bike.

    Not the same.

  5. #5
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    thanks....

    Thanks for the explanations. I guess what I am trying to do is make the spot a good/great climber while making it a good/great decender. I set my fork to 501mm+/- A2C as DT intented it to be and it climbed awesome, but it felt a little like I was going to go over the bars on the decents. Maybe I just need to get used to it. Do you guys stick close to the A2C recommendations provided by Turner?

    thanks again
    IB

  6. #6
    Just another FOC'er
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    Quote Originally Posted by IdahoBiker
    Thanks for the explanations. I guess what I am trying to do is make the spot a good/great climber while making it a good/great decender. I set my fork to 501mm+/- A2C as DT intented it to be and it climbed awesome, but it felt a little like I was going to go over the bars on the decents. Maybe I just need to get used to it. Do you guys stick close to the A2C recommendations provided by Turner?

    thanks again
    IB
    518 for me, and I like to lower it for climbing. I also like a pretty short stem.

  7. #7
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    Try using a shorter stem to get you a little more upright and the weight of your upper body a little further back.

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