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  1. #1
    Daniel the Dog
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    A potential chainsuck unclogging trick?

    When you chainsuck a Turner it is epic: chain drops down, so it is pain to get out. My Switchblade was easy to get the chain out because you had so much room. However, I had to remove my crank today to get the chain out because there is no room between the crank and swingarm. So, I thought about putting a 2mm shim to pull the crank out a bit, so it is easier to get the chain out after it gets lodged between the crank and swing arm. Has anyone done this?

    Your ideas,

    Jay

    PS bike shop said Turners are prone to chainsuck. I don't understand why that would be.
    Last edited by Jaybo; 04-04-2004 at 07:25 PM.

  2. #2
    FM
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    Much easier solution:
    Put all your weight on the seat- this rotates your swingarm upwards as the shock compresses, opening up the distance between your chainrings and chainstay yoke. Then you can easily pull the chain out without removing anything. I have a little move where I put one foot on the drive-side pedal, just enough to pull on the chain, and I put my full body weight on the seat to compress the shock. Works everytime!

    That's funny what your LBS said. Total BS- I'd be curious to hear their reasoning behind that one!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    When you chainsuck a Turner it is epic: chain drops down, so it is pain to get out. My Switchblade was easy to get the chain out because you had so much room. However, I had to remove my crank today to get the chain out because there is no room between the crank and swingarm. So, I thought about putting a 2mm shim to pull the crank out a bit, so it is easier to get the chain out after it gets lodged between the crank and swing arm. Has anyone done this?

    Your ideas,

    Jay

    PS bike shop said Turners are prone to chainsuck. I don't understand why that would be.

  3. #3
    Lay off the Levers
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    When you chainsuck a Turner it is epic: chain drops down, so it is pain to get out. My Switchblade was easy to get the chain out because you had so much room. However, I had to remove my crank today to get the chain out because there is no room between the crank and swingarm. So, I thought about putting a 2mm shim to pull the crank out a bit, so it is easier to get the chain out after it gets lodged between the crank and swing arm. Has anyone done this?

    Your ideas,

    Jay

    PS bike shop said Turners are prone to chainsuck. I don't understand why that would be.
    Curious.

    What kind of lube do you use on your chain? Also what were the riding conditions? Dry/wet/muddy?

    Another question are you talking about chain-drop or chain-suck? Chain drop can happen for a lot of reasons including rough terrain etc. If the chain simply fell off and THEN got jammed, I think that's chain-drop which is a different problem.

    I hardly ever get chainsuck. In fact it never happened until this spring when I rode some wetter rides using "extra-dry" lube for the first time. I usually use Pedro's Syn Lube which is more wet weather type of stuff but dam, it's great stuff! I even use it on my fork stanchions. I used it all last year and had not chainsuck problems.

    This season I tried the extra dry lube, and there were times I could acutally see the chain clinging to the 7-8-O'clock position on the chainring trying to climb up into the chainstay.

    OTOH I sometimes get chaindrop when trying to shift to a larger cog before the chain finishes dropping to the granny upfront...to agressive at the controls.

    So maybe you can try a "wetter" lube before changing hardware?
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM
    ...That's funny what your LBS said. Total BS- I'd be curious to hear their reasoning behind that one!
    Hmmm...I wonder did they build JB's bike? if so the problem might be the loose nut behind the wrench.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  5. #5
    Daniel the Dog
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    Excellent ideas....

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Curious.

    What kind of lube do you use on your chain? Also what were the riding conditions? Dry/wet/muddy?

    Another question are you talking about chain-drop or chain-suck? Chain drop can happen for a lot of reasons including rough terrain etc. If the chain simply fell off and THEN got jammed, I think that's chain-drop which is a different problem.

    I hardly ever get chainsuck. In fact it never happened until this spring when I rode some wetter rides using "extra-dry" lube for the first time. I usually use Pedro's Syn Lube which is more wet weather type of stuff but dam, it's great stuff! I even use it on my fork stanchions. I used it all last year and had not chainsuck problems.

    This season I tried the extra dry lube, and there were times I could acutally see the chain clinging to the 7-8-O'clock position on the chainring trying to climb up into the chainstay.

    OTOH I sometimes get chaindrop when trying to shift to a larger cog before the chain finishes dropping to the granny upfront...to agressive at the controls.

    So maybe you can try a "wetter" lube before changing hardware?
    Great ideas guys! I will try both. I was using Triflow. I was riding in bone dry riding.

    My LBS has a bratty mechanic who always take popshots at my bikes. Every bike I have had has some flaw to this guy. He is a good mechanic though.

    I found a bent link tonight and my chain was a little long. I bet those two problems along with a good cleaning should stop the chain from dropping onto the BB shell. FM, I will try compressing the seat the next time it drops.

    I love that bike! Screw my goofball mechanic.

    Jaybo

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    My LBS has a bratty mechanic who always take popshots at my bikes. Every bike I have had has some flaw to this guy. He is a good mechanic though.
    I get that from two of the three LBS's. They are so heavily indoctrinated by Specialized and Cannondale that they can't think beyond the Brain and the Lefty. In fact when I rolled into one of the shops sporting my new 5 Spot frame one mechanic refused to wrench on it because he "had far too many problems with Turners" . And trying to hold a rational conversation about equipment is just too painful. Atleast yours is a good mechanic.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    ...one mechanic refused to wrench on it because he "had far too many problems with Turners" ...
    Sounds like the biggest problem he had was with the one that wasn't in his garage.

    3 days and only a spin class..yeah, you could say I'm grumpy.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  8. #8
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    When you chainsuck a Turner it is epic: chain drops down, so it is pain to get out. My Switchblade was easy to get the chain out because you had so much room.

    PS bike shop said Turners are prone to chainsuck. I don't understand why that would be.
    What cranks do you have? I run '03 XTs with a 113mm bb and Raceface rings. There is enough room between my ring and chainstay that if the chain fails to let go, it just feeds up and over the top of the chainstay smoothly. I just have to backpedal for it to drop back to the proper side. My old XTRs and Next LPs sat closer to the chainstay and could jam the chain. It is a bb spindle length/crank issue. Try the spacer or a longer bb spindle.

    As for the "Turners chainsuck" comment, I would seriously find a new wrench since he obviously does not understand much about bike mechanics. Frames don't cause chain suck, they are the victim of it. It is a lame situation when it happens, and can seem like a hard demon to exorcize, but my Turners suck no more or less than other bikes I have owned, including my hardtails.

    tscheezy
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  9. #9
    eastman
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    New question here. lube... and the 34

    Agree 100% with Bikezilla...make sure you’re using the right lube for the right conditions; I was exclusive to the paraffin based lubes (like dry ice) until the great rains hit here in east last spring/summer…with moisture came suck…that is, using this type of lube. I experimented with a few water friendly lubes (like synlube) and the suck went away. Lubes, and usage in conditions they’re intended for, make a considerable difference.

    I’ve also noticed that most folks (me included) experience suck/drop as they’re about to climb a hill or as they hit a steeper section of a climb in progress......you know, you’re in the middle ring and the 34 in the back….look up and realize there’s a lot more hill…climbing pressure on the pedals, and no more gears in the back… you drop it into granny…then BAM, the chain sucks/drops.

    With this chain angle, and added pressure, it seems like most folks ‘drop’ when transitioning from the middle ring to the granny. Not sure if it’s just the dudes I ride with, but when the conditions are ripe, there always seems to be a (chain suck) pileup at these points during our rides.

    -e

  10. #10
    Lay off the Levers
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    The wimps way out...

    Quote Originally Posted by eastman
    ...I’ve also noticed that most folks (me included) experience suck/drop as they’re about to climb a hill or as they hit a steeper section of a climb in progress......you know, you’re in the middle ring and the 34 in the back….look up and realize there’s a lot more hill…climbing pressure on the pedals, and no more gears in the back… you drop it into granny…then BAM, the chain sucks/drops....
    I made three basic skills a target for second nature behavior

    1) spinning...it helped that I lived next to a city park.
    2) unclipping as reflexively as blinking...I'll take a dab over a fall any day.
    3) soft-pedaling a shift.

    I realize we all know about the ills of shifting under power, and I still prefer delay my shifting until I can't get any more out of that gear, but I always put a little more into the last down-stroke before the shift and soft-pedal the upstroke to the next gear. The times that's impossible I take the dab with the mindset I'd rather berate myself for being a wimp than have to fix my drivetrain on the trail...and I've never bent a cassette cog either. At my size, I could probably rip my RDer right off if forced my way through a really late shift.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  11. #11
    eastman
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    Good job! new & improved

    Yeah…once is enough for that trick; soft pedaling and better techniques have resulted in zero suck so far…life is good!

    Now, I just need the weather to cooperate this weekend.

    -e

  12. #12
    Daniel the Dog
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    It sucks, pun intended, to goober up the frame chainstay....

    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    What cranks do you have? I run '03 XTs with a 113mm bb and Raceface rings. There is enough room between my ring and chainstay that if the chain fails to let go, it just feeds up and over the top of the chainstay smoothly. I just have to backpedal for it to drop back to the proper side. My old XTRs and Next LPs sat closer to the chainstay and could jam the chain. It is a bb spindle length/crank issue. Try the spacer or a longer bb spindle.

    As for the "Turners chainsuck" comment, I would seriously find a new wrench since he obviously does not understand much about bike mechanics. Frames don't cause chain suck, they are the victim of it. It is a lame situation when it happens, and can seem like a hard demon to exorcize, but my Turners suck no more or less than other bikes I have owned, including my hardtails.

    tscheezy
    However, it is a bike meant to engage it a nasty rough sport. Therefore, I live with some scratch's. It is life. I run 73 by 113mm XT BB with a '03 XT with Race Face rings. I wonder why yours would be different. Hmm. I had to break the chain to route it through last suck. I have fixed it though. I had a bent link and the chain was too long. I will just soft pedal when I shift.

    Jaybo

    PS You were right about Turner's, Tscheezy. I've turned into a homer.

  13. #13
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    I run 73 by 113mm XT BB with a '03 XT with Race Face rings. I wonder why yours would be different.

    PS You were right about Turner's, Tscheezy. I've turned into a homer.
    Wow, that is weird. Same bb and cranks. I would take a pic of the clearance I have and post it, but I'm on the road and can't just now. Barny also has the same bb and cranks and hers does get "stucker" than mine does. Funny.

    And don't feel bad. We are all Monster Turner Homers deep down. Most people just havn't discovered it yet.

    tscheezy
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

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