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Thread: "Main" Pivot?

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    "Main" Pivot?

    Hi everyone,

    I was looking over the torque specs for the pivots and noticed the "main" pivot is torqued tighter than the rest.

    Which one is the "main" pivot on a Horst link Turner? I guessed the one on the seat tube connected to the rocker when i torqued everything down. Hope I was right....

    KL

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Nope, the "main" pivot is the one just behind the bb. You aren't going to kill anything especially considering all the hardware at each location is the same anyway, but you can back the rocker off a little and tighten the "main" one down. The "main" pivot just has to deal with the biggest loads, therefore the snugger torque I'm guessing. I guess I should have been more explicit in the instructions.

    Ta-ta,
    tscheezy
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
    DGC
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    BB area pivot

    Quote Originally Posted by KLars
    Hi everyone,

    I was looking over the torque specs for the pivots and noticed the "main" pivot is torqued tighter than the rest.

    Which one is the "main" pivot on a Horst link Turner? I guessed the one on the seat tube connected to the rocker when i torqued everything down. Hope I was right....

    KL
    On a Horst link Turner, the main pivot is the one at the BB area, on the lower stays.

  4. #4
    DGC
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    riding

    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Nope, the "main" pivot is the one just behind the bb. You aren't going to kill anything especially considering all the hardware at each location is the same anyway, but you can back the rocker off a little and tighten the "main" one down. The "main" pivot just has to deal with the biggest loads, therefore the snugger torque I'm guessing. I guess I should have been more explicit in the instructions.

    Ta-ta,
    tscheezy
    Hopefully we will hook up for a ride on Monday Tscheezy, should be good dirt right now down in Auburn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DGC
    On a Horst link Turner, the main pivot is the one at the BB area, on the lower stays.
    OK, thanks guys! Guess I should have asked here first.....

    I will back off the rocker and snug down the one down by the BB.

    KL

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    Thanks BTW...

    I used your instructions to tear down and reassemble my XCE. Very helpful!

    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by KLars
    Hi everyone,

    I was looking over the torque specs for the pivots and noticed the "main" pivot is torqued tighter than the rest.

    Which one is the "main" pivot on a Horst link Turner? I guessed the one on the seat tube connected to the rocker when i torqued everything down. Hope I was right....

    KL
    Where can I get the torque specs for a Burner?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjcarr
    Where can I get the torque specs for a Burner?
    Check out the Assembly section of Turner_Tech:

    http://turner_tech.tripod.com/index.html


    KL

  9. #9
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjcarr
    Where can I get the torque specs for a Burner?
    Like KL said, follow the link or the one in my signature which is basically the same pages which Terminaut is hosting on Fooriders. It is all the same stuff as on the Turner site.

    All the Turner XC/trail/freeride bikes use the same bushing system, so all use the same specs for torque and assembly, from the RFX down to the O2. I would use a lighter torque on the horst links though, since they are pretty tiny. Just make those snug.

    tscheezy
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    ...I would use a lighter torque on the horst links though, since they are pretty tiny. Just make those snug.

    tscheezy
    This is good advice. I actually stripped the threads on one of my bolts trying to get it torqued to 9ft/lb. Oddly enough, though the bolt kept spinning inside the nut, I couldn't pull the nut off. I had to cut if off with a dremel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by incubus
    This is good advice. I actually stripped the threads on one of my bolts trying to get it torqued to 9ft/lb. Oddly enough, though the bolt kept spinning inside the nut, I couldn't pull the nut off. I had to cut if off with a dremel.
    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    I would use a lighter torque on the horst links though, since they are pretty tiny. Just make those snug.
    hmmm....

    Really? I torqued mine to spec at 9ft/lbs without problems. I snugged them down and they seemed fine. Then I refereneced the Turner card and it said ALL pivot and shock bolts so I did them all at the same torque with exception of the main pivot.

    Maybe I will back them off to just passed snug. It did seem a little excessive that these would be torqued the same as the rocker pivots for example.

    Comments?

    KL

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KLars
    hmmm....

    Really? I torqued mine to spec at 9ft/lbs without problems....
    This reminds me, anyone have a good recommendation on a reasonably priced troque wrench? The one I saw recommended in last month's magazine was ~$120 fahgetaboutit. The one in Home Depot was ~$60 but was 1/2" drive and 3' long... And the automotive shops seem to only have big AND expensive.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    This reminds me, anyone have a good recommendation on a reasonably priced troque wrench? The one I saw recommended in last month's magazine was ~$120 fahgetaboutit. The one in Home Depot was ~$60 but was 1/2" drive and 3' long... And the automotive shops seem to only have big AND expensive.
    I bought mine at Sears for around $70 I think. It is nice and small. 3/8" drive and probably about 20" long. It has a range of 25 in/lbs-250in/lbs. Really works great. It is the type where you twist the handle to set the torque and then it "clicks" when you have reached the level you set.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    This reminds me, anyone have a good recommendation on a reasonably priced troque wrench?
    Bikezilla,

    I recently purchased a dial/click type ft/lbs torque wrench with a 3/8" drive from Sears to do some suspension maintenance. I think I paid under $70. They also have the same wrench in in/lbs. The nice thing about this wrench is that the local Sear Automotive Center will calibrate it for free.

    Crash

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    Bikezilla,

    I recently purchased a dial/click type ft/lbs torque wrench with a 3/8" drive from Sears to do some suspension maintenance. I think I paid under $70. They also have the same wrench in in/lbs. The nice thing about this wrench is that the local Sear Automotive Center will calibrate it for free.

    Crash
    Thanks Crash and Klars, I'll stop by Sears and check it out.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    This reminds me, anyone have a good recommendation on a reasonably priced troque wrench? The one I saw recommended in last month's magazine was ~$120 fahgetaboutit. The one in Home Depot was ~$60 but was 1/2" drive and 3' long... And the automotive shops seem to only have big AND expensive.
    Home Depot *should* have a smaller, 3/8" drive torque wrenches. Maybe they were just out. In any case, the click type wrenches might be overkill for this application. I picked up a beam type wrench at Sears for $20. The click-type units aren't all that accurate in the extreme limits of their range. These torque settings are so low, that they end up being on the edge of the minimums of the wrench's range. They are also on the high side of most in/lb wrenches. The beam-type, though seemingly archaic, work well for this type of job.

  17. #17
    eastman
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    Good job! Sears...!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Thanks Crash and Klars, I'll stop by Sears and check it out.
    Sears has a great selection; from 19 bucks for a pretty nice wrench w/ lifetime warranty, to the granddaddy of torque wrenches...at just over 2 hundred clams.

    You can check out the selection on the sears web site…under the tools tab (then search for torque).

    Enjoy!

  18. #18
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    The Park TW-1 Torque Wrench is $32. 0-60 in-lb 1/4" drive. They also make larger one for BB etc.

    If you get one that adjusts the torque by screwing in at the bottom of the handle, be sure to unload it (set in to 0 in/lb) when you're done. Otherwise it will get out of calibration.

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    Also recommend Sears

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Thanks Crash and Klars, I'll stop by Sears and check it out.
    torque wrenches. Try to get the click type. They're much easier to use.....especially when you're in a position where you can't easily read the scale.

  20. #20
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    Thanks folks, Wow!

    Many thanks folks, so much input, I should have asked much sooner.
    Golly gee, I must be the only guy who dosen't own a torque wrench.

    I have used both a click type and a beam type. I'm curious how Sears, or anyone for that matter would calibrate one. But I'm hoping they are accurate enough to use right out of the package...othewise what would be the point?

    Hmmm much to think about Click or beam. Guess I'll play with what they have on the shelf at Sears. I've been eyeing Home Depot for something like a year and the one near my house only stocks the biggie. The Sears in my area is a rather small mall type, but they seem to have a decent tool section. I'll check by there tomorrow.

    Cheers, Gears and Beers!
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Many thanks folks, so much input, I should have asked much sooner.
    Golly gee, I must be the only guy who dosen't own a torque wrench.

    I have used both a click type and a beam type. I'm curious how Sears, or anyone for that matter would calibrate one. But I'm hoping they are accurate enough to use right out of the package...othewise what would be the point?

    Hmmm much to think about Click or beam. Guess I'll play with what they have on the shelf at Sears. I've been eyeing Home Depot for something like a year and the one near my house only stocks the biggie. The Sears in my area is a rather small mall type, but they seem to have a decent tool section. I'll check by there tomorrow.

    Cheers, Gears and Beers!
    They lose calibration many ways. Most better torque wrenches come in hard plastic cases, some of the reason being that having it just banging around in a tool box or the bed of your pickup with cause it to lose it's calibration.

    In any case, be cognizant of their range and know that they're less accurate at the ends of their range. And the fact that the bolts on your turner have settings below 10lb/ft.

    good luck

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    Bikezilla,

    I recently purchased a dial/click type ft/lbs torque wrench with a 3/8" drive from Sears to do some suspension maintenance. I think I paid under $70. They also have the same wrench in in/lbs. The nice thing about this wrench is that the local Sear Automotive Center will calibrate it for free.

    Crash
    I just stopped by my local Sears. They had a small selection of TRs I ended up with the 3/8" drive 5-80ft-lbs / 5-110 Nm with a "digital" dial on the base. Slightly bigger in case I need it for the car. Seemed nice in the package but turning the dial it seems less precise. While it's marked in 1/2 ft-lbs gradients, one can set it at a several places between the marks, like any other TR. not worth the extra $10 IMO. BTW this Craftsman product only has a 1 year warranty.

    They had the beam type but the 3/8 drive version was in in-lbs and had some funky kind of scale where an odd numbre of marks were between the numbers starting with 15. Too hard to read, and too much thought to figure it out. Too bad it was much cheaper.

    The automotive shop was empty when I stopped by. When you asked for calibration, what did they do? Can I just use this out of the box?

    Geeze all this to torque a few bicycle bolts. I have two pairs of SPD shoes that cost less...(not the SIDIs) Oh well how critical could this be? It's got to be better than just going by hand.

    Thanks All.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    I just stopped by my local Sears. They had a small selection of TRs I ended up with the 3/8" drive 5-80ft-lbs / 5-110 Nm with a "digital" dial on the base. Slightly bigger in case I need it for the car. Seemed nice in the package but turning the dial it seems less precise. While it's marked in 1/2 ft-lbs gradients, one can set it at a several places between the marks, like any other TR. not worth the extra $10 IMO. BTW this Craftsman product only has a 1 year warranty.

    They had the beam type but the 3/8 drive version was in in-lbs and had some funky kind of scale where an odd numbre of marks were between the numbers starting with 15. Too hard to read, and too much thought to figure it out. Too bad it was much cheaper.

    The automotive shop was empty when I stopped by. When you asked for calibration, what did they do? Can I just use this out of the box?

    Geeze all this to torque a few bicycle bolts. I have two pairs of SPD shoes that cost less...(not the SIDIs) Oh well how critical could this be? It's got to be better than just going by hand.

    Thanks All.

    It ought to work right out of the box. Unfortunately, the only way to tell if it'll out of calibration is to take it someplace where they can test it, and then recalibrate it. Just be sure to wind it down when you're done, and don't use it as a breaker bar when you're changing the struts on your taurus and you should be good for a while.

    You'll know if it's rediculously out of calibration if you develop a good feel for what kind of force a 10lb. weight would exert on a 1 ft. bar... Which some mechanics do have a good feel for.

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    Stripped the thread

    Quote Originally Posted by incubus
    This is good advice. I actually stripped the threads on one of my bolts trying to get it torqued to 9ft/lb. Oddly enough, though the bolt kept spinning inside the nut, I couldn't pull the nut off. I had to cut if off with a dremel.
    INCUBUS...I went to service my rear pivots. Maybe I should have listened to this advice because I stripped the bolt at 9ft/lb of torque. My pivot shaft was snug inside of the bushings. Isn't it critical to have the proper torque? Otherwise, you may have the screw rotating inside of the pivot shaft. Especially in my case where this pivot shaft is very snug. And I did notice that the threads of my bolt had some wear, an indication to me that it was turning inside. Anyway, what dremel tool bit did you use to get this bolt off? Did you call Turner about this and have them ship you new hardware? I want to be careful not to carve into my frame.

    Thanks in advance for your help!

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    I may have my own answer

    As far as the 9 ft-lbs of torque: I spoke with a guy at work. He thinks that I got some lubrication on the screw threads which reduces the friction and thus the 9 ft-lbs of torque was way too high. And this is probably the case. Therefor, I think the 9 ft-lbs is good for a screw without wear on the threads and without lubrication on them.

    Getting the screw out: He said that I should drill out the head of the screw very carefully. The allen recess will be a good locational guide for the drill bit. He then said I could use a small punch to push it out. He said he could help me and I may take him up on that.

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