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  1. #1
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    Light Spot, Heavy RFX Can they share the stable?

    Greetings,

    I have been enjoying my 5 Spot since October of 2007 (100 rides/1800 miles) and have it built up fairly light (Fox 140, RP23, 2.1 front, 2.4 rear tubeless stan's ZTR355 rims). UGI/Need a new toy/Turner sale is gnawing at me. Is the 2008 RFX too close to the 5 Spot to consider having both in the garage? Is the Highline the better choice for more separation?

    I mainly ride at South Mountain park here in Phoenix and roll most of the bigger obstacles, but am thinking of adding travel to increase the fun.

    Thanks for any opinions.....

    bobo

  2. #2
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    The RFX would be super on Goat Camp, Hobart, Geronimo, et al. The Highline is a great climber for a "big" bike, but it's still a lot of meat to pack around (though fellow Phoenixer Dirtbag did sell his Pack after the got a HL). If your 355's can survive SoMo under you now, then I don't see a real need for you to go all the way to a Highline. My RFX is 31# with a Lyric 2-Step, RP23, Stans Flows, and middle of the road parts and I would not hesitate to ride it off some decent sized chit.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
    mr. wonderful
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    though fellow Phoenixer Dirtbag did sell his Pack after the got a HL.
    Not so quick, I still have my Pack and I split my time between the two almost evenly. If you were to have one bike for SoMo, it would be hard to find a better fit than an RFX. If you ride mostly National, the Spot is a great bike. If you venture off National, the RFX and Highline are better suited. Goat Camp and trips to Mt. Eldon are definitely Highline territory. If you go for the Highline though, be prepared for a 40lb. bike. My Six Pack, solidly built (but with single ply tires) comes in at just under 33lbs.

    decisions, decisions
    Last edited by dirtbag; 07-14-2008 at 05:45 AM.

  4. #4
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    Not to quick,
    Now who am I thinking of down there?? Somebody got a HL and was at least planning on selling their Pack...
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  5. #5
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    Yes, it's quite easy to make such a mistake and inserting names and places and situations along the way.

  6. #6
    trail fairy
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    I have an 06 Spot and RFX

    Spot with Pike TA front and rear still light enough for all day rides but can take a hit and charge hard, RFX is all coil but I can switch my TA wheels from my Spot to my RFX and have either an FR or AM hard charging ride!

    If I was to do it all again now it would be a 5.5spot and a Highline, I would still go with a Pike or Thor as my fork, not a 36 and build my Highline coil FnR with either a Totem or 66, with all the Marz issues of late probably a Totem!

    One bike = RFX!
    Two bikes spread out don't overlap too much!

    Thats just me, in 06 the HL wasn't quite as well refined as it is now geo and travel wise I prefer and like the current option, same with the 5.5 for rides I couldn't use the HL on the 5.5 is more than enough bike to charge hard on all day with a good TA setup, going bigger than that imo only restricts its all round ability which its best at, thats just me..

    So Spot and HL for me!
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  7. #7
    Lay off the Levers
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    I had a both the Spot built up light and a 6Pack built burly and found them an excellent pair with little overlap. The spot was perfect for fast pedalling XC style riding with enough rip to hit the trailside fun whenever I wanted. The RFX was more than trailable enough to take it up a notch on many of the same trails and then stalk out for bigger funner stuff, and even do lift service w/o feeling out of it's league.

    I sold the RFX to fund the Highline so my Spot has become my general trailbike again. IMO there's a big gap that's not filled btwn the Spot and the Highline. That just happened to be where I was doing most of my riding.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  8. #8
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Found it.

    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    i just bought a highline as a fringe bike, thinking i would still spend most of my time on my six pack. i really don't think that you will find the rfx pedals or climbs significantly better than the highline. i'm convinced of this and will be selling my beloved six pack soon.
    JC, I know yer bitter and all, so here's a pic of Barny to make you feel better.

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  9. #9
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    A two bike quiver made up of a light Spot and a heavy RFX covers a really huge spectrum of mtb riding without too much overlap.

    At one end, you can use the Spot for endurance racing, and at the other end, the heavy RFX will handle most everything at Whistler. That's a lot of ground.

    I had a medium weight Spot and medium weight RFX, and it worked out great. Well, until I got a Sultan, and sold them both. But that had as much to do with my riding changing a bit with age than the bikes themselves. You'd get less potential parts switching ability, but I'd actually go Sultan/heavy RFX, myself.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  10. #10
    Knomer
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    Any pre-07 RFX can live happily next to a Spot. It's only the last couple years that Dave has chosen to sell one frame and call it 2 different things in his lineup.
    Global Director of Sales: Knolly Bikes

  11. #11
    mr. wonderful
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Found it.


    JC, I know yer bitter and all, so here's a pic of Barny to make you feel better.

    Did I say that? WTF was I thinkin'? Well, after the HL honeymoon, I couldn't bring myself to selling my beloved Six Pack. . . unlike some people I know

    Oh, and here's to Barny

  12. #12
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    Anyone else share this opinion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bottoms
    Any pre-07 RFX can live happily next to a Spot. It's only the last couple years that Dave has chosen to sell one frame and call it 2 different things in his lineup.
    Since I am talking about an 08 RFX and 07 Spot it appears that you think there is too much overlap....

    bobo

  13. #13
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Dusty only exists to stir pots. I have an '03 Spot and an '08 RFX. Right now they have pretty similar builds. Both with RS air forks (Pike dual air vs Lyric 2-Step) and air shocks (RP3 vs RP23), and nearly identical component specs. Maybe I'm just sensitive to this stuff, but I think they ride significantly differently. If I were to send the Spot to Jenny Craig and slap Stans 355 rims on and a lot of carbon crap, and put a stout coil shock and fork on the RFX along with some serious wheels, the difference would be dramatic. Now the Highline is undeniably in a different league again, but like I said if you can survive SoMo on Stan's pinner rims right now, you are going to have to step up a LOT to make a HL worthwhile.

    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    Did I say that? WTF was I thinkin'? Well, after the HL honeymoon, I couldn't bring myself to selling my beloved Six Pack. . . unlike some people I know
    I ain't sold anything (yet).
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  14. #14
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    Pretty sure I am not a HL guy :)

    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Dusty only exists to stir pots. I have an '03 Spot and an '08 RFX. Right now they have pretty similar builds. Both with RS air forks (Pike dual air vs Lyric 2-Step) and air shocks (RP3 vs RP23), and nearly identical component specs. Maybe I'm just sensitive to this stuff, but I think they ride significantly differently. If I were to send the Spot to Jenny Craig and slap Stans 355 rims on and a lot of carbon crap, and put a stout coil shock and fork on the RFX along with some serious wheels, the difference would be dramatic. Now the Highline is undeniably in a different league again, but like I said if you can survive SoMo on Stan's pinner rims right now, you are going to have to step up a LOT to make a HL worthwhile.


    I ain't sold anything (yet).
    All comments are read, some have much more weight than others.....

    RFX is the way to go, I just hope that it does not retire the Spot to the dusty part of the garage....

    bobo

  15. #15
    trail fairy
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    Good I think eveyone should go this way more chance there'll be an HL for me later in the future when Im ready, phys said today another 5 months at this rate f o o k it, I new I should have moved when everyone said stay still..

    anyway HL to look forward too built as an XC bike whooooooooooooo and a DHR, to hang on the wall
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN
    Greetings,

    I have been enjoying my 5 Spot since October of 2007 (100 rides/1800 miles) and have it built up fairly light (Fox 140, RP23, 2.1 front, 2.4 rear tubeless stan's ZTR355 rims). UGI/Need a new toy/Turner sale is gnawing at me. Is the 2008 RFX too close to the 5 Spot to consider having both in the garage? Is the Highline the better choice for more separation?

    I mainly ride at South Mountain park here in Phoenix and roll most of the bigger obstacles, but am thinking of adding travel to increase the fun.

    Thanks for any opinions.....

    bobo
    I have an 07 RFX and an 08 Spot and I ride South Mountain almost every weekend. I would not classify myself as a very aggressive rider. My Spot is built up at 28 lbs. My RFX is 29.5 lbs. Although they are close in weight, they definitely have different riding characterstics. The Spot is little more efficient on the climbs. However, I have been really impressed with the climbing ability of the RFX. The RFX is very nice for the descents and it is more stable in the technical terrain. Overall, the Spot is a little quicker in its handling. The riding characteristics of the Spot and RFX are noticeble despite the similar builds. I would not have guessed the differences would have been as noticeable. I believe the differences are enough to justify an RFX and a Spot; particularly if you are going to build a beefy RFX.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Found it.


    JC, I know yer bitter and all, so here's a pic of Barny to make you feel better.
    Your quote doesn't actually back up the reality of the situation. Good to see you went and spent the time to search, however. Acting like something is so doesn't mean other people will be subject to your delusion.

  18. #18
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    Great feedback!!

    Quote Originally Posted by JTBAZ
    I have an 07 RFX and an 08 Spot and I ride South Mountain almost every weekend. I would not classify myself as a very aggressive rider. My Spot is built up at 28 lbs. My RFX is 29.5 lbs. Although they are close in weight, they definitely have different riding characterstics. The Spot is little more efficient on the climbs. However, I have been really impressed with the climbing ability of the RFX. The RFX is very nice for the descents and it is more stable in the technical terrain. Overall, the Spot is a little quicker in its handling. The riding characteristics of the Spot and RFX are noticeble despite the similar builds. I would not have guessed the differences would have been as noticeable. I believe the differences are enough to justify an RFX and a Spot; particularly if you are going to build a beefy RFX.
    JTBAZ,

    Which bike do you ride more often?

    bobo

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN
    JTBAZ,

    Which bike do you ride more often?

    bobo
    It is split 50/50. It also depends on the trails and my mood. If I am only going to do National, Mormon I am more inclined to take out the RFX. If I am going to do National, Morman and mix in Javelina, DC and/or the east loops by the golf course I will bring out the Spot. However, there have been times where I have only ridden National and Mormon and brough the Spot. I definitely do not push the RFX to its limits - I don't jump or huck, but I like the stability and the plushness of the RFX.

    I also find that I will ride the Spot for a few weeks than decide to switch to the RFX - it keeps the riding fresh switching between both bikes. As was mentioned, having both bikes in the stable allows for a very wide spectrum of riding. They are both great to have for what SM has to offer.

  20. #20
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    The RFX would be super on Goat Camp, Hobart, Geronimo, et al. The Highline is a great climber for a "big" bike, but it's still a lot of meat to pack around (though fellow Phoenixer Dirtbag did sell his Pack after the got a HL). If your 355's can survive SoMo under you now, then I don't see a real need for you to go all the way to a Highline. My RFX is 31# with a Lyric 2-Step, RP23, Stans Flows, and middle of the road parts and I would not hesitate to ride it off some decent sized chit.
    The RFX is a great do-it-all bike, but Holbert, Geronimo, 24th street, and others simply tear up bikes and the more travel you have, the more control you have. I've done em on 5" and even slightly less bikes, and I'm sure others do them on hardtails, but to move with the crowd you should be riding those trails on a DH type bike, highline or DHR. I've seen plenty of downhill bikes and parts chewed up by those trails. Slamming against those rocks is one of those situations where it's nice to have a DH bike.

    On the other hand, none of those runs are very long and some have climbs, so the you may go with a tradeoff, but I ran full on DH bikes on those trails and didn't feel like I was over-gunned. Only that I was under-gunned with the real small bikes, so I couldn't go quite as fast or be quite as dangerous.

    If I only have one bike, the RFX is definitely a great bike to do some of those trails on, as well as ride more XCish on National. If you're shuttling said trails, a bigger bike is nice, but not necessary. Maybe I'm a little jaded with said SoMo DH trails because I used to shuttle them a lot. If you gotta go self powered most of the time, the highline is probably a bad choice.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  21. #21
    PSI
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    dont know what your terrain is like and both scenarios (light-spot/rfx, vs. med-spot/hl) will yield much fun, but...

    personally i would get the hl (and a fullface, platform pedals and body armor) just to mix it up a little and try something new. if you will be riding the rfx with the same kit as the spot (xc helmet, clipped in, etc) then it will be a too similar experience in the end.

  22. #22
    mr. wonderful
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN
    JTBAZ,

    Which bike do you ride more often?

    bobo
    Better question, what trails do you want to ride on the new bike?

    If you want to stick to National and Mormon Loop, you definitely will not benefit by going the Highline.

    If you want to test the waters on Viejo, Geronimo, Cochise, Holbert, Kiwanis, and Alta, the RFX will get you there, but the Highline would be the better choice. The RFX is very capable in technical terrain, both up and down. It is solid, stable, well balanced, high enough BB (but not too high), longish wheelbase (but not freakishly long), and slack enough head angle to handle the worst choss that SoMo will dish out.

    If you are committed to riding these trails, plus you would like to venture off to Goat Camp, Millie, Mt. Elden, Bootleg, and even a trip to Whistler, do yourself a favor and step up to a Highline.

    As tscheezy pointed out, I was very close to selling my Six Pack after I got the Highline. Yeah, it's about 7 lbs. heavier, but it isn't significantly more difficult to climb the hill than the Six Pack. If I'm just running up to BV and back down National, I usually grab the Six Pack. If I'm planning a trip down off the north or south sides, I grab the Highline.

    It's really a matter of what YOU want to do. Do you want a more solid ride on the trails you already ride? Do you want to test the waters on some more gnar trails? Do you want to jump in head first on more gnar?
    Last edited by dirtbag; 07-15-2008 at 05:33 PM.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by JTBAZ
    It is split 50/50. It also depends on the trails and my mood. If I am only going to do National, Mormon I am more inclined to take out the RFX. If I am going to do National, Morman and mix in Javelina, DC and/or the east loops by the golf course I will bring out the Spot. However, there have been times where I have only ridden National and Mormon and brough the Spot. I definitely do not push the RFX to its limits - I don't jump or huck, but I like the stability and the plushness of the RFX.

    I also find that I will ride the Spot for a few weeks than decide to switch to the RFX - it keeps the riding fresh switching between both bikes. As was mentioned, having both bikes in the stable allows for a very wide spectrum of riding. They are both great to have for what SM has to offer.
    Thanks for these comments. It sounds like we would have similar riding styles and having the Spot and the RFX works for you and keeps things somewhat fresh. Just what I was thinking.

    bobo

    PS Didn't you have a Highline at one time?

  24. #24
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    Yep!

    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    Better question, what trails do you want to ride on the new bike?

    If you want to stick to National and Mormon Loop, you definately will not benifit by going the the Highline.

    If you want to test the waters on Viejo, Geronimo, Cochise, Holbert, Kiwanis, and Alta, the RFX will get you there, but the Highline would be the better choice. The RFX is very capable in technical terrain, both up and down. It is solid, stable, well balanced, high enough BB (but not too high), longish wheelbase (but not freakishly long), and slack enough head angle to handle the worst choss that SoMo will dish out.

    If you are committed to riding these trails, plus you would like to venture off to Goat Camp, Millie, Mt. Elden, Bootleg, and even a trip to Whistler, do yourself a favor and step up to a Highline.

    As tscheezy pointed out, I was very close to selling my Six Pack after I got the Highline. Yeah, it's about 7 lbs. heavier, but it isn't significantly more difficult to climb the hill than the Six Pack. If I'm just running up to BV and back down National, I usually grab the Six Pack. If I'm planning a trip down off the north or south sides, I grab the Highline.

    It's really a matter of what YOU want to do. Do you want a more solid ride on the trails you already ride? Do you want to test the waters on some more gnar trails? Do you want to jump in head first on more gnar?
    I think that based on what I am reading, I want the RFX. The Highline is too much for my game.... . I think that I answer yes, yes, and no to your questions which means RFX. I think that No, Yes, Yes means Highline.

    Thanks,
    bobo

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN
    Thanks for these comments. It sounds like we would have similar riding styles and having the Spot and the RFX works for you and keeps things somewhat fresh. Just what I was thinking.

    bobo

    PS Didn't you have a Highline at one time?
    I have never owned a highline - it is too much bike for me. I have owned the Burner, Flux, 5 Spot, Spot, 06 RFX, 07 RFX, and Sultan. All are great for their intended purposes.

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