Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,052

    How freely should the pivots move?

    I replaced the shock on my HL spot and found that the suspension would not compress under the weight of the bike with the shock disconnected. I had to lean on the bike to get it to move.
    I did the grease gun thing, also took apart the chainstay pivots because I thought I was going to break something trying to get the other T40 bolts loose and gave up. I really moved the pivots to try to get them to loosen up, which they did a little, but they certainly stay put unless moved by hand.
    Normal? No slop or play in the pivots. I think it just puts a bit of damping into the suspension...

    Should the pivots rotate as freely as a hub, BB, or headset?
    Last edited by jh_on_the_cape; 09-22-2013 at 05:12 PM.
    Only boring people get bored.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    267
    Ideally the with the bike in a stand and the rear wheel removed, the suspension should be able to move under it's own weight. New frames are rarely like that and it can take many miles to wear them in.

    for the impatient and mechanically inclined the bushings can be fitted to the shafts by sanding them down the plastic bushings a bit and test fitting the shafts as you go. I personally use foam sanding pads for household paintwork. I cut them into a size that can be wrapped around an appropriately sized allen key that will fit into the bushings with the foam sanding pad compressed slightly, thus preloading the sanding surface against the bushing.

    I sand the bushings till the pivot shafts can rotate with moderate pressure on the allen key that will fit into the hex inside the pivot shaft and then let riding the bike do the rest of the work.

  3. #3
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,276
    It doesn't sound right. My pivots always moved easily, not as easy as say a headset bearing, but at least as easy as a new pedal rotates, the chainstay pivots were always pretty slick.

    If they ARE moving and there's no slop or play, it's probably fine, but you need to ride more

    To remove the torx bolts at the pivots, you need to heat them up. For some strange reason, they used green locktite on them, which is basically "never ever ever remove". It's not all that hard or complicated and one SHOULD be able to take apart their pivots, but it takes heat to do it. Keep a soldering iron on it for several minutes, then try.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vespasianus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,273
    Quote Originally Posted by jh_on_the_cape View Post
    I replaced the shock on my HL spot and found that the suspension would not compress under the weight of the bike with the shock disconnected. I had to lean on the bike to get it to move.
    I did the grease gun thing, also took apart the chainstay pivots because I thought I was going to break something trying to get the other T40 bolts loose and gave up. I really moved the pivots to try to get them to loosen up, which they did a little, but they certainly stay put unless moved by hand.
    Normal? No slop or play in the pivots. I think it just puts a bit of damping into the suspension...

    Should the pivots rotate as freely as a hub, BB, or headset?
    No it should move pretty freely. As you mention it is a HL spot, I assume it has been ridden for a while? I wonder if things have seized in there. Have the pivots/bushings ever been serviced?
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  5. #5
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    No it should move pretty freely. As you mention it is a HL spot, I assume it has been ridden for a while? I wonder if things have seized in there. Have the pivots/bushings ever been serviced?
    Never serviced, 2004 frame. Ridden plenty. I figured they would develop slop not get stiff.
    Only boring people get bored.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vespasianus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,273
    Quote Originally Posted by jh_on_the_cape View Post
    Never serviced, 2004 frame. Ridden plenty. I figured they would develop slop not get stiff.
    Sometimes that happens but often, if it gets wet or just plain dries out, the whole thing will just get tight. 9 years is pretty good for a pivot service! Might be time to take it to the shop and a full rebuild. Afterwords, it might just feel like a whole new bike!

    With that said, after you get the pivot serviced, you may want to upgrade or service your shock. Push is selling refurbished Kashima coated RP23 for $229. That is a smoking deal for a custom tuned shock (they custom tune it for you and your bike). I have personally found that a PUSH tune can dramatically improve the ride of a HL or SP bike. Highly, highly recommended.
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  7. #7
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,052
    I was putting on a fresh pushed rp23 which is when I noticed the stiff pivots. I don't think the old frame is worth the investment of a pivot service. The shock was almost given to me.
    Only boring people get bored.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank N. Byke View Post
    That is a neat trick. I just use one of those Handy Dandy 12v impact drivers. I also found a long handle Hex Tool a few years ago. Who wants to wait around? I like to jump in and get my hands dirty!
    I stripped one and had to drill it out doing it like that. That locktite may not let go.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Buzz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    782
    Quote Originally Posted by jh_on_the_cape View Post
    I was putting on a fresh pushed rp23 which is when I noticed the stiff pivots. I don't think the old frame is worth the investment of a pivot service. The shock was almost given to me.
    You probably wouldnt have to replace anything to service the pivots. Just take it all apart, clean, re-grease and you will probably be good to go.

  10. #10
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,052
    I thought about that and tried to loosen the T40 bolts and was afraid I would strip/ruin something. I had not yet read the heat gun tip. I only did the chainstay pivots.
    I just pumped in a bunch of grease until it squirted out clear from the sides and worked the pivots back and forth way past their normal range because I had disconnected the shock and the chainstay pivots. I know grease should not work out the sides, but it does on some of the pivots. In fact, those are the pivots that move the best.
    It is better now, but not quite like new.
    Thanks for all the tips. If I had someone looking over my shoulder while I took it apart, I would probably just do it. I have learned that sometimes trying to get a little better on maintenance leaves me with something broken and unrideable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    You probably wouldnt have to replace anything to service the pivots. Just take it all apart, clean, re-grease and you will probably be good to go.
    Only boring people get bored.

  11. #11
    ~~~~~~~~
    Reputation: airwreck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,765
    sounds like your pivot bolts might just be torqued down too much. Get them freed up using heat to break the thread lock then apply the correct torque. Dosn't need a complete dissemble.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bullit_cn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,479
    while heated, Make sure your T40 is straightly aligned with the bolt too,
    Use just enough leverage with your hand, do not force it.
    If still tight, heat it again,
    And repeat,
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-07-2013, 04:58 PM
  2. Freely spinning XV air can on Float RP2....
    By waldog in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-05-2012, 04:44 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-28-2012, 12:34 PM
  4. Mukluk 2 rear hub will not engage, spins freely
    By rth009 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-20-2011, 08:55 PM
  5. Pedals. Month old and one doesn't spin freely
    By ProjectDan35 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-24-2011, 10:02 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •