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  1. #1
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    Has Turner switched to cartridge bearings?

    This came up in another thread, but I thought I'd start one dedicated to the topic since it seems to be a big change, and in the hopes that someone has more info. It looks like newer bikes have moved from bushings to bearings. Is this true? Seems like a big change. I always loved the idea of bushings, although my Czar ones have been a bit more finicky than past models. Liked them mostly because they worked well, and were user friendly. I recently had a Yeti, and changing the bearings every season and a half or so was a real pain. Unless you had a great press, it wasn't really DIY.

  2. #2
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    A: The journal bearing design offers incredible strength and long life with very little maintenance. Bearings are designed with high-speed rotation in mind (skateboard wheels, drill motors etc.) The journal bearing we use has a purpose of holding a very tight tolerance along with carrying a load much greater than that produced by a bicycle frame, these two attributes we feel are essential to a great riding bike. The rear of our frames often gets praise for how stiff it is laterally and how well it tracks through the roots, ruts, and rocks encountered on a mountain bike.
    Because a bearing found in a bike pivot never makes a full rotation, you rely on two maybe three of the balls in the cartridge to carry the entire load and pressures generated by the rider. Over time this is what creates that "crunchy" feel or "squeaky" sounds people often comment about.

    Bearings are also made of steel, steel rusts after being exposed to water, grit and grime, again found in our everyday riding. So long lasting, tight tolerance and incredible load bearing capabilities are why we have chosen to stick with journal bearings.
    from their FAQ section, I imagine if their philosophy on this changed there would be a press-release.
    My bike MCA kinda climbs like a billy-goat. WOO WOO!

  3. #3
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    Turner bushings have ruled the world for a long time, but bearings and their use have come so far since the early days -- SC using tiny little skateboard bearings anybody?! -- that I guess it wouldn't surprise me if Turner adopted bearings somewhere down the line.
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  4. #4
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    plus one on bushings, so much more surface area and won't rust out

  5. #5
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    +1 on bushings
    Especially in the wet UK where my 4 year old Flux gets ridden 3000 mile a year and has only had its bushings change once (18 months ago).

  6. #6
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    -1 on bushings. they creak are are noisy . Wud rather a bearing.

  7. #7
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    I'm in dry Southern California and ride entirely in the Southwest but my 03 5 Spot has never creaked or made any bushing related noise, I changed the bushings in 2012 only because I had the frame powdercoated and had to remove them anyway. My 02 prototype 6 pack still has the original bushings but that bike has far fewer miles than the 5 Spot has.
    I've only had the DW Flux for a little over a year so it wouldn't be much of a testimonial to say it's been trouble free but it has been. Greasing the bushings is critical to smooth quiet operation.

  8. #8
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    Fans of both, I guess. But my post was prompted by the xxl czar post, where there were, in fact, bearings rather than bushings (acc. to poster). Looks the same on pictures of Burner I've seen. Was anybody at Sea Otter? I'm more curious than anything.

  9. #9
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    The DHR has bearings and it works really well. they are sealed into the frame with tiny cups so.. no problem. ridden quite a bit of shitty weather.
    That said.. no issue with the burner so.. its all good if done right.

  10. #10
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    clearly a zerk shown on the updated burner on bikerumor:

    Has Turner switched to cartridge bearings?-2016-turner-bikes-burner-alloy-full-susp-mtn-bike-2.jpg

  11. #11
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    If you see the XXL Czar post you'll see something being different. So might be just for the XC, as DH also have its own bearings. Carbon might transfer creaking sounds better than alu as well.. I'm sure dave will tell us when he's ready

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    Quote Originally Posted by sennaster View Post
    clearly a zerk shown on the updated burner on bikerumor:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2016-turner-bikes-burner-alloy-full-susp-mtn-bike-2.jpg 
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    Zerk can be on cartridge bearings too! Santa Cruz uses them.

  13. #13
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    I just looked at the XXL Czar thread, those photos look (to me) like they've started using prettier bolts, nothing really indicating cartridge bearings, the size of the mounting points are not any larger, which cartridge's typically are, so I don't think so.
    My bike MCA kinda climbs like a billy-goat. WOO WOO!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by shupack View Post
    I just looked at the XXL Czar thread, those photos look (to me) like they've started using prettier bolts, nothing really indicating cartridge bearings, the size of the mounting points are not any larger, which cartridge's typically are, so I don't think so.
    There's no longer zerk fittings on the XXL czar so I think it's cartridge bearings now

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by funnyjr View Post
    There's no longer zerk fittings on the XXL czar so I think it's cartridge bearings now
    And the bike shop which put it together said it was cartridge bearings

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chunkylover53 View Post
    And the bike shop which put it together said it was cartridge bearings
    This is true.

  17. #17
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    I've had a preproduction XXL Czar for around 5 months now and it's definitely a bearing setup vs the more traditional Turner bushing. The bike has been thru quite abit of crappy weather and has been quite as a church mouse. Rock solid too with absolutely no play, where my bushing Sultan was plagued with play. Though it only bothered me when I wasn't riding it and crushing thru rocks and roots!!!


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  18. #18
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    No one here has had the bearing conversation with DT? The material/weight gain to add bearings to the alu apparently is an issue.

    So is the Czars lower link still bushings?

  19. #19
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    omit
    Last edited by chasejj; 04-30-2015 at 09:34 AM.

  20. #20
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    Bushings seem a lot easier to work with or @ least for me. i do use the enduro needle bearings on the shock mounts b/c theyre the smoothest thing ive found.

  21. #21
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    I see DT lurking now so maybe he's ready to share more. I've been on Turner ball bearing bikes (DHR) and bushings for a long time. Bushings sure help keep maintenance issues down in my environment but Davids got to do what he feels is best and I'm good with that.

  22. #22
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    Bump.... Any new info on this question?
    Vini vidi velo!

  23. #23
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    I noticed this on the Turner website:

    Improved Cable Routing
    In order to make sure that no one had unwanted contact with the bike we created a special machined part to pass the rear derailleur cable directly through the tube on the right side of the rear end.

    Hmmm...this new too? I also noticed they removed "journal bushings" from features section of Czar. My questions/remarks are all from a curiosity standpoint. Love my Czar as is (esp. after adding Pike 120). One thing I'd like to see is a little better routing for front dérailleur cable - I find length has to be perfect to avoid contact with clevis bolt.

    These changes responsible for what seems a long wait for larger sized frames?

  24. #24
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    Crickets... ... ... ?

    Did I miss an answer on another thread? Are the new Czars running cartridge bearings or bushings? If so, why the change? Are people satisfied or not with the new setup? Also, as I recall, someone in Turnerville was replacing bushings with needle bearings. How's that been working out?

    Turner seems strangely quiet on this topic.

    Also curious whether people are happy with the PF30 BB on the Czar?
    Vini vidi velo!

  25. #25
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    The RFX has cartridge bearings. No bushings. May be a carbon thing?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    Also curious whether people are happy with the PF30 BB on the Czar?
    There is a thread on this somewhere. I got two very full seasons on a Praxis BB. The original Wheels Mfg. BB didn't make it two months. I suspect the Enduro Engineering Torque Tite may be a good alternative, also.
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  27. #27
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    Pinkbike's review has a bit of detail about the bearings Turner is using on the RFX. Safe to assume they are using the same on the Czar?


    2016 Turner RFX v4.0 Enduro - Review - Pinkbike
    Vini vidi velo!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trajan View Post
    The RFX has cartridge bearings. No bushings. May be a carbon thing?
    I was guessing a carbon thing as well. I've never owned a carbon bike but from what I understand is that they will amplify any noise so I'm guessing a noisy bushing on a CF frame would be much louder than on an aluminum frame... although, It might be due to Asia manufacturing. I can also see the RFX having bearings due to the travel. I personally like bushings. They are cheap and reliable.
    Killing it with close inspection.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireLikeIYA View Post
    I was guessing a carbon thing as well. I've never owned a carbon bike but from what I understand is that they will amplify any noise so I'm guessing a noisy bushing on a CF frame would be much louder than on an aluminum frame... although, It might be due to Asia manufacturing. I can also see the RFX having bearings due to the travel. I personally like bushings. They are cheap and reliable.
    I agree. The Turner bushing system is easy to work on and maintain as well.
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  30. #30
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    I REALLY like my 5-Spot frame, but I am not a fan of the bushings. My experience so far is that without a bit of tinkering and maintenance they are sticky (enough to effect the ride). So in the end I found them about the same as cartridge bearings in terms of overall maintenance. Actually, in the beginning (first 6 months) they were more maintenance than any frame I've owned with bearings.

    I can see where bushings make sense for pivots that do not see much movement (like the lower link), but even there I had to get in there and do some "tuning" to get them to turn free enough. I do not think they are a good choice for the upper pivots, they are just too sticky. I have never been able to get my 5-spot frame to move as freely as any frame I have had with bearings.

    I plan to stay on this frame for a while yet, though when I get my next frame, I am more likely to get a Turner if it has bearings rather than bushings. So I will be glad if they switch to bearings.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  31. #31
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    Bushings on my turners were by far the best pivots I've dealt with on mountain bikes.

    As an example, after 1.5 seasons or so on my specialized, the pivots were shot to hell and needed replacement, which was a major PITA with blind pullers and other major work. The turners simply needed grease every once and a while and went on forever.

    For limited rotation applications like rear suspension, bushings with grease ports are the right design. Far better lateral rigidity too.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I REALLY like my 5-Spot frame, but I am not a fan of the bushings. My experience so far is that without a bit of tinkering and maintenance they are sticky (enough to effect the ride). So in the end I found them about the same as cartridge bearings in terms of overall maintenance. Actually, in the beginning (first 6 months) they were more maintenance than any frame I've owned with bearings.

    I can see where bushings make sense for pivots that do not see much movement (like the lower link), but even there I had to get in there and do some "tuning" to get them to turn free enough. I do not think they are a good choice for the upper pivots, they are just too sticky. I have never been able to get my 5-spot frame to move as freely as any frame I have had with bearings.

    I plan to stay on this frame for a while yet, though when I get my next frame, I am more likely to get a Turner if it has bearings rather than bushings. So I will be glad if they switch to bearings.
    Same experience for me with my new Burner. Bearings are currently only in the DHR and Carbon frames. Wish there was a way for me to convert my Burner to bearings. No amount of tweaking torque settings and grease prevents the link from binding somewhere. I encourage all you bushing and bearing owners to let your air out of your shock or remove it all together and cycle both frames through their range and note the massive difference in stiction.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by madamfunk View Post
    Same experience for me with my new Burner. Bearings are currently only in the DHR and Carbon frames. Wish there was a way for me to convert my Burner to bearings. No amount of tweaking torque settings and grease prevents the link from binding somewhere. I encourage all you bushing and bearing owners to let your air out of your shock or remove it all together and cycle both frames through their range and note the massive difference in stiction.
    But you don't ride it that way. That little stiction is not going to matter a whole lot with your weight on the bike. I have 5 full suspension bikes, 2 of them Turners and they are the most plush bikes of them all, the other 3 use bearings. My 08 tnt spot, that I rode the snot out of and still ride is still on the original bushings. Just a little shot of grease once in a while. I am amazed at the durability of the 08 spot. I also have a dw link spot which I have only had since March, so I'm not sure of the durability with the dw link, but it is a plush ride as well. Always replacing bearings on my other bikes. I'll take the bushing system, great longevity.

  34. #34
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    Has Turner switched to cartridge bearings?

    Seems that Turner is heading towards a full carbon lineup and for some reason or another carbon Turners seem to be equipped with cartridge bearings. There is absolutely no way anyone can explain to me as to why some ball bearings could be better.

    One suggestion though, I have for any bike brand using ball bearings (100% of the whole bike industry?): Why not offer FREE correct bearing tools for customers with the bike/frame purchase? And also make those damn things (bearings) a breeze to replace too.



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    Last edited by Panttaani; 11-14-2015 at 04:34 AM.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panttaani View Post
    Seems that Turner is heading towards a full carbon lineup and for some reason or another carbon Turners seem to be equipped with cartridge bearings.
    Seems that way to me too. I'm guessing US-made alloy frames are probably too expensive to make compared to carbon frames from Taiwan/China/etc., and for whatever reason, most folks crave carbon so Turner has to change to survive.

    Personally, I love my USAlloy Turner and was hoping to trade it back in a few years on a new one, but I'll be skipping that if Turner does indeed go full carbon lineup. <sigh>

  36. #36
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    I like what Intense is doing by offering carbon and made in USA aluminum versions of the Spider and Tracer.

    My last purchase was carbon, which was a "had to have" at the time, and ruled out Turner. But now that I got that out of my system, I'd be happy with carbon or Al next time.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panttaani View Post

    One suggestion though, I have for any bike brand using ball bearings (100% of the whole bike industry?): Why not offer FREE correct bearing tools for customers with the bike/frame purchase? And also make those damn things (bearings) a breeze to replace too.



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    I just noticed Rocky Mountain has been using bushings on pivots for few years so not 100% of the whole industry. With grease ports too.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panttaani View Post
    Seems that Turner is heading towards a full carbon lineup and for some reason or another carbon Turners seem to be equipped with cartridge bearings. There is absolutely no way anyone can explain to me as to why some ball bearings could be better.

    One suggestion though, I have for any bike brand using ball bearings (100% of the whole bike industry?): Why not offer FREE correct bearing tools for customers with the bike/frame purchase? And also make those damn things (bearings) a breeze to replace too.



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    This is my biggest beef with bearings. They are pretty much impossible to remove and install without a proper press. And I wouldn't want to use a DIY system on an expensive carbon frame. Plus, I live in a dry climate, and bearings after a season or a season and a half need to be repacked. This can be a hassle with some bearing systems (I had a Yeti with bearings, and although I repacked them, they weren't designed to do this).

    I started this thread out of curiosity. Just wanted to know the reason for the shift. Tough getting right tolerances with carbon manufacturers? Something with the DW link just working better with bearings (the creaks and squeaks seemed to become more common with the shift from TNT to DW)?

  39. #39
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    Advantages of bearings that has led to a major change in Turner Bikes suspension:

    1. Wear and tear is contained in the completely replaceable bearing.
    2. Mechanics can quickly and easily replace standard sized cartridge bearings with out special tools or training or extra time to customize the bushing system.
    3. Bearings today are nothing like they were in the past with Enduro creating special bearings specifically for the high load low rpm requirements of bicycle suspension.

    RRP SUSPENSION BEARING TOOLS

  40. #40
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    Thanks. Have to say I'm a little sad to see bushings go. For the home mechanic they were nice to work with. And with my TNT Flux and v. 1 Czar bushings have been bombproof. But well-considered change can be good.


    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes View Post
    Advantages of bearings that has led to a major change in Turner Bikes suspension:

    1. Wear and tear is contained in the completely replaceable bearing.
    2. Mechanics can quickly and easily replace standard sized cartridge bearings with out special tools or training or extra time to customize the bushing system.
    3. Bearings today are nothing like they were in the past with Enduro creating special bearings specifically for the high load low rpm requirements of bicycle suspension.

    RRP SUSPENSION BEARING TOOLS

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes View Post
    Advantages of bearings that has led to a major change in Turner Bikes suspension:

    1. Wear and tear is contained in the completely replaceable bearing.
    2. Mechanics can quickly and easily replace standard sized cartridge bearings with out special tools or training or extra time to customize the bushing system.
    3. Bearings today are nothing like they were in the past with Enduro creating special bearings specifically for the high load low rpm requirements of bicycle suspension.

    RRP SUSPENSION BEARING TOOLS
    Thanks for pointing out the suspension-specific tools, DT.

    Have you guys tried out the Enduro blind puller and their regular bearing press?

  42. #42
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    This bearing tool from Ibis is pretty nice and not as expensive. Ripley, bearing, Clemens, tool

    I bet that, combined with the specific bearing guides from RWC (if needed) would do the trick.

    Hammer and socket has also proven to be effective.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes View Post
    Advantages of bearings that has led to a major change in Turner Bikes suspension:

    1. Wear and tear is contained in the completely replaceable bearing.
    2. Mechanics can quickly and easily replace standard sized cartridge bearings with out special tools or training or extra time to customize the bushing system.
    3. Bearings today are nothing like they were in the past with Enduro creating special bearings specifically for the high load low rpm requirements of bicycle suspension.

    RRP SUSPENSION BEARING TOOLS
    Fair enough, I respect that view.
    It's just that my own personal experience is quite the opposite. It's not even 2 years that I was cursing my previous bikes with full complement Endura bearings. Those had to be replaced after every six months which led me to buy a Turner and it's been such a joy! I expect I will enjoy my bushing Sultan for many years

  44. #44
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    One of reason I liked about the turner bikes is their bushing system that seems to last a lifetime on the older Turner bikes.
    Not to blame on DT but it seems that the manufacturing level of today is seems not as good as the old days.
    Frames with bushing need a very high degree of tolerance or the creaks starts to come out. My Czar creaks too but with the new pivot shafts with copper/bronse inserts, the creak is gone. It fixes the issues but more like a band aid to me.

    But I start to ignore about those details as long the ride is good and creaksfree.
    What matters to me now is that my RFX is in transit now and cannot wait to build it, ride it and dissect later for details....
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  45. #45
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    I actually really like the bushing system and found it very easy to service. The move to bearings sounds like marketing, most of the points were made 10 years ago by other companies. Sorry. Regardless, bushings or bearings, Turner still makes great bikes, so I don't really care what they use!
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  46. #46
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    My personal experience, 4 years on 2011 5 spot, that I replaced 4 or 5 bushing kits. The last one was the one piece linkage which did improved the suspension by quite a bit. Bottom line, I am looking forward to the bearings.

  47. #47
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    Had a 6pack from 2005 to 2012, it morphed into a RFX along the way, at which point I replaced the bushings, main bushings didn't need it, horst-link bushings were a little loose and slid out easily, no play, but probably was good to replace. During the life of the bike I'd squirt in a little grease every few months. Never had anything that had pivots that worked that well. My foes was a tiny bit more rigid, but designed by a moron with a large 5" bolt going through the scissor link, so it would bend all the time. The other bikes had trashy "one season" bearings, as my current Specialized E29 does. I've already changed out the E29 bearings once and it was not fun, required a blind-puller and the bike has no "lips" to punch out the bearings from. Limited rotation wrecks bearings IMO, which the new turner ones are supposed to deal with better due to the design, but the lateral rigidity and overall design of the bushings leaves me skeptical.

    I also had an Rocky Mountain back in the day that had bushings (heck, also my diamondback before it), but there's no comparison, those were trashy "not really for more than a season" bushings, nothing like the IGUS.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2tdan View Post
    My personal experience, 4 years on 2011 5 spot, that I replaced 4 or 5 bushing kits. The last one was the one piece linkage which did improved the suspension by quite a bit. Bottom line, I am looking forward to the bearings.

    I just replaced my main pivot this year, this is also on a 2011 5-Spot. I was a little hesitant as I thought it would be difficult. Was shocked at how really easy it was. I changed the bearings on my old Titus Motolite once in 4 years but had to have a shop do it.

    I also have the one piece linkage kit. I purchased it (just because) but have not installed it yet. I am running fun bolts on the rear and have not had any issues with stiffness but have hear this makes the rear even stiffer. True?
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  49. #49
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    When it was bushings folks complained about the stiction and wanted bearings. Now that it's bearings folks pine for bushings. Go figure.

    Not that it matters but on my old Ventana that had bearings I couldn't tell the difference in suspension movement (or stiction) even when the bearings became quite notchy and rough. They're quite easy to change out so not sure really what the big deal is. Same goes for bushings. Even with the PUSH bushing linkage kit there was still quite a bit of stiction and the suspension did not move nearly as freely as my previous bike with bearings. Can you tell a difference when actually riding? No, I don't think so.

    And the marketing comment above is pretty funny.

  50. #50
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    Yes, definitely for me. I am on the clydesdales category though.



    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    I just replaced my main pivot this year, this is also on a 2011 5-Spot. I was a little hesitant as I thought it would be difficult. Was shocked at how really easy it was. I changed the bearings on my old Titus Motolite once in 4 years but had to have a shop do it.

    I also have the one piece linkage kit. I purchased it (just because) but have not installed it yet. I am running fun bolts on the rear and have not had any issues with stiffness but have hear this makes the rear even stiffer. True?

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    When did these new type of bearings come out?
    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes View Post
    Advantages of bearings that has led to a major change in Turner Bikes suspension:

    1. Wear and tear is contained in the completely replaceable bearing.
    2. Mechanics can quickly and easily replace standard sized cartridge bearings with out special tools or training or extra time to customize the bushing system.
    3. Bearings today are nothing like they were in the past with Enduro creating special bearings specifically for the high load low rpm requirements of bicycle suspension.

    RRP SUSPENSION BEARING TOOLS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snopro440 View Post
    When did these new type of bearings come out?

    About 15 years ago.
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    It's funny, the arguments used to make the switch to bushings are exactly the reasons given as to why the move to bearings was resisted, back in the day.....OK, I get it for the big basher bikes like the DHR, but abandoning the bushings on the trailbikes? My suspicious mind sees this scenario: Seems that the Asian frame makers must have made a big stink about producing bearing-only frames and said no-no to the bushings - you don't need as tight of tolerances with bearings, so it's easier and cheaper since they don't have to be perfect. Take it or leave it - bearings or try to make it in USA for the same price....? (still rockin my tnt)

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    I welcome any change. On my recent Flux and Czar the bushing system has been generally good but big miles have taken its toll. And shims and upgrades have been needed.

    So it's not all been roses, but both bikes have done over 7000 miles. So there's going to be some maintenance whatever system you've got .

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    Quote Originally Posted by jokermtb View Post
    It's funny, the arguments used to make the switch to bushings are exactly the reasons given as to why the move to bearings was resisted, back in the day.....OK, I get it for the big basher bikes like the DHR, but abandoning the bushings on the trailbikes? My suspicious mind sees this scenario: Seems that the Asian frame makers must have made a big stink about producing bearing-only frames and said no-no to the bushings - you don't need as tight of tolerances with bearings, so it's easier and cheaper since they don't have to be perfect. Take it or leave it - bearings or try to make it in USA for the same price....? (still rockin my tnt)
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    My problem is that DT himself told me that the bushings were far superior a year and a half ago (it could have been 2 years ago ) when I was looking at buying my flux. Now suddenly the bearings are better.
    We also spoke at great length about how being American made was important to both of us too, but it seems that the company has changed positions on that too. DT said that it was important to him that the Flux was American made, by Americans , with American aluminum on equipment made in America ( he was proud it was some of the equipment that was in the Cannondale factory when they left the USA- ironically he said that it was a huge bummer that they moved to Asian production......).
    In the bearing vs bushing debate, I don't care what the reason is, I'd just like it if they were straight forward with the reasoning for it. I can't believe that the bearing technology has changed since I talked to David , and if that's the case, I'v lost my stoke for Turner. If the technology has changed, that's different case I guess but it all seems that the Asian manufacturer of the frames has changed the mind of Turner.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jokermtb View Post
    It's funny, the arguments used to make the switch to bushings are exactly the reasons given as to why the move to bearings was resisted, back in the day.....OK, I get it for the big basher bikes like the DHR, but abandoning the bushings on the trailbikes? My suspicious mind sees this scenario: Seems that the Asian frame makers must have made a big stink about producing bearing-only frames and said no-no to the bushings - you don't need as tight of tolerances with bearings, so it's easier and cheaper since they don't have to be perfect. Take it or leave it - bearings or try to make it in USA for the same price....? (still rockin my tnt)

    I also think that Turner aluminum bikes were always on the heavy side (a good thing) and bearing would have only made things look worse. The bushings probably helped keep the weight down and helped to differentiate the brand. On a carbon bike, I don't think the weight is as much of an issue.
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    Performance wise, bearings and bushings both work. It doesn't really matter if the decision is economic because it can hardly be considered a "downgrade" to emulate what almost all the best frames on the market already have.

    I agree it could be communicated better, but it isn't too surprising that whatever the design is, the manufacturer is going to communicate it as "the best".

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    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve View Post
    Performance wise, bearings and bushings both work. It doesn't really matter if the decision is economic because it can hardly be considered a "downgrade" to emulate what almost all the best frames on the market already have.

    I agree it could be communicated better, but it isn't too surprising that whatever the design is, the manufacturer is going to communicate it as "the best".

    This weekend, I changed my lower link on my 5-spot and the bushing that go with it. Honestly, I don't care if Turner uses bushings or bearings as long as the process of servicing them remains as easy and as logical as they are now. Working on my 5-spot is a thing of joy as everything is so logical and nicely put together that you can really tell that the end-user was kept in mind (or it at least seem so!).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    This weekend, I changed my lower link on my 5-spot and the bushing that go with it. Honestly, I don't care if Turner uses bushings or bearings as long as the process of servicing them remains as easy and as logical as they are now. Working on my 5-spot is a thing of joy as everything is so logical and nicely put together that you can really tell that the end-user was kept in mind (or it at least seem so!).
    To the one piece linkage?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2tdan View Post
    To the one piece linkage?
    Yes. Have not had a chance to ride it yet but feel much burlier. Very easy to change out, took at most 30 minutes - most of which where spent cleaning everything.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    Yes. Have not had a chance to ride it yet but feel much burlier. Very easy to change out, took at most 30 minutes - most of which where spent cleaning everything.
    I am very pleased with the one piece linkage, have had bad experience with the bushing on my 5-spot but that's seems to be over with the one piece. The 5 spot is an amazing bike, so balanced.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2tdan View Post
    I am very pleased with the one piece linkage, have had bad experience with the bushing on my 5-spot but that's seems to be over with the one piece. The 5 spot is an amazing bike, so balanced.
    I have only changed the main pivot and that was this year (5 yr old bike!). All my other pivots and such were tight and clean. Some of them don't take grease well so I tend to just take them apart, clean them, lube them and put them back together.
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