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  1. #1
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    New question here. Guys please help me decide... 5Spot vs 6Pack

    I will be using it on a blue/black diamond, where I first have to climb. Very steep and technical. I will use a Marz 66 '06 or a Fox36.
    I already own a DHR for freeride and downhill, so its for my second bike.
    I am concern about drops and the 5Spot. But I am also concern about the climbing ability of the 6Pack....

    BTW. I am selling a VPFree. It climbs awesome, but the VPP works VERY bad descending under braking. The rear end stiffens and does not copy the ground. Sucks.

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    Well, the only choice would seem to be the 6-Pack. If you built them to the same weight, and set the cockpits up similarly, the Pack will climb anything the 5-Spot will. That is not an issue. But putting either of those forks on the 5-Spot would be an issue, so it seems like a no-brainer: get a 6-Pack. The Spot is a trail bike anyway, not a "black diamond" bike. Get the right tool for the job, I'd say.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
    RaD
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    Better go with the Pack, hands down!
    It can be build relative light if you want and does climb very, very well for the rear wheel travel and beefy construction.
    As Tscheezy mentioned above the 36 or 66 is not recomented to use in the Spot.
    The 5Spot is designed around a Vanilla 125 if I remember right, the SixPack is designed around the 36.

    Later
    RaD

  4. #4
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katsumoto
    I will be using it on a blue/black diamond, where I first have to climb. Very steep and technical. I will use a Marz 66 '06 or a Fox36.
    I already own a DHR for freeride and downhill, so its for my second bike.
    I am concern about drops and the 5Spot. But I am also concern about the climbing ability of the 6Pack....

    BTW. I am selling a VPFree. It climbs awesome, but the VPP works VERY bad descending under braking. The rear end stiffens and does not copy the ground. Sucks.
    What? You can feel the rear end stiffening up during braking! That's not allowed on this forum! You're going to piss off all the future TNT owners!!!






    The 6 pack requires a little more power to get up a hill than a 5spot. Not so much because the frame is different, but because a 6 pack will be built up with slightly heavier parts, making a heavier bike overal (usual builds for 5spots around 30lbs, usual builds for 6packs around 33-34lbs). The pack does climb a bit better than my old foes FXR in the sense that the 6pack is longer, and the front end doesn't want to come off the ground as easily on the steep climbs. The weight is a factor, and you'll get stronger fairly quickly if you are a dedicated rider. IMO, a few pounds of weight difference makes more of a difference than whichever bike is a "better pedaling" bike. I could ride all day up and down hills on a 25lb XC FS bike, not cause it's a great pedalining bike, but because it's way lighter than current bike. I may not have as much fun on the downhills on such a bike though... In my experience climbing bikes from 23 to 50lbs, the weight makes more of a difference compared to which bike "bobs" less.

    If you are using the bike for shuttle runs, or so you can hit every drop on the side of a trail, you want a 6 pack. Also, a 6" fork on the 5spot is a no-no, the leverage might cause some problems, like ripping off the headtube. The pack is a very balanced ride with 6" of travel on both ends, although the versatility shoots up immensely when you can lower the fork for climbing, either via ETA or a travel adjustment.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  5. #5
    Just another FOC'er
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    6 Pack no doubt.

    I've got one of each and they're really very different bikes. My large 5-Spot sits at 31 lbs with oil/coil front and back. It's a really fun, fast trail bike, but I try not to abuse it. It climbs amazingly well, and recently I had the fastest lap time for our 10 man corporate team at a 24 hours of adrenaline race. It's a long legged XC bike.

    My Pack is new to the stable. This bike is a medium, Z150 fork, D321 wheels w/DH tires, platforms peds, chainguide, etc. 39.55 lbs on an calibrated shipping scale! What's amazing is that the final weight is within 0.1 lbs of my spreadsheet prediction. Anyway, this is the techno, "black diamond" bike. Super fun, and a very burly beast. Just yesterday though, I climbed one of our very tough local hills on it, and this is something that's really hard even on an XC bike. It's super steep and takes 20 minutes to get to the top. Bottom line: the Pack can climb and take the abuse.

    ~danno

  6. #6
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    Mild Hijack

    So, to mildly hijack this thread, if a guy was building a six pack for almost purely heavy duty trail riding use, with occasional light freeride stuff, would using the DHX-Air make it more cross-countryish than the DHX-Coil? Or would the progressive action of the DHX-Air screw everything up because the pack rockers are designed for the linear action of the DHX Coil?

    Hey, how about that -- a suspension related question/concern that has NOTHING to do with HL vs. TNT. Hooray -- cancel the intervention!!!!!

  7. #7
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    Now why would you call the DHX Air progressive? It's not a SID. I actually wouldn't mind a little more progression it it (spring rate wise), actually.

    I think the limiting factor on the DHX Air is that is it so linear, and requires such a high pressure, that "large" people may be SOL in terms of getting the air spring pressure high enough on the Pack's 3:1 ratio. I'm a svelt 180# and had the DHX A up to 270psi in Moab for drops (I'm back down to 250psi at home).
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Yeah, it requires a lot of pressure, around 250psi gets me between 1/3rd and 1/4th total travel as sag. It's also not very progressive as cheezy pointed out, but I didn't bottom it last night, even with it blowing through 80% of the travel most of the time. The last half an inch to 1/4" of the shaft travel was very progressive, just the overal rate is pretty linear. It seems to be a draw as to which shock is better. The DHX air does act very linear, and it does give up a little compliance on low speed impacts. It's pretty easily overcome, but it does feel more like an air shock, just the best one that I've tried. The benefit is being able to exactly set your spring rate, whereas with the coil version you might be lucky and a 500lb spring might work fine for you, but maybe in reality you'd theortically be better off with a 525lb spring, but fox only makes them in 50lb incriments, so you can really get the air version tuned a little better, and it may feel a little better due to this. I'm not blown away with it, going to do some more tuning and riding today on it, but at this point I'll probably put the coil version back on.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    Xtremely Moderate
    Reputation: e<i>o's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katsumoto
    I am selling a VPFree. It climbs awesome, but the VPP works VERY bad descending under braking. The rear end stiffens and does not copy the ground. Sucks...............
    A. You are nutz.
    B. You do not have your shock dialed.
    C. You're imagening brake jack.
    D. All of the above.


    "Korash your enemiez, zee zem driven bevore you, and ear ze lamentation of za vemen"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Now why would you call the DHX Air progressive? It's not a SID. I actually wouldn't mind a little more progression it it (spring rate wise), actually.

    I think the limiting factor on the DHX Air is that is it so linear, and requires such a high pressure, that "large" people may be SOL in terms of getting the air spring pressure high enough on the Pack's 3:1 ratio. I'm a svelt 180# and had the DHX A up to 270psi in Moab for drops (I'm back down to 250psi at home).
    Haven't ridden the DHX-Air (current ride is RP3 on Spotty). Comment made based on the fact that the DHX-Air gets its spring by squeezing a fixed volume of air into a smaller space, which has to be progressive to at least some extent, unless Fox has one of them thar Talas things going on in the shock.

    Air pressure's in the shox are sure confusing. I'm at 195 wearing a smile, and I get ~30% sag on the Spotty RP3 with 185 psi. I guess the combination of the DHX-Air requiring higher pressure than the RP3, as well as the Pack's higher leverage ratio is what causes.

    I'm not sure I'd be comfortable running the DHX-Air at the pressures my weight would require on the Pack, and I know I don't want the near-nine pound frame weight of an XL Pack with DHX Coil.

    Guess I'll just keep on happily riding along on the Spot!

  11. #11
    Don't be a sheep
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    Quote Originally Posted by eo
    A. You are nutz.
    B. You do not have your shock dialed.
    C. You're imagening brake jack.
    D. All of the above.


    What he said.
    "Do not touch the trim"

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