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Thread: Flux vs. Spot

  1. #1
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    Flux vs. Spot

    Im positive this has been covered, but time is short to grab an 05 Turner and no time for long research projects...and hey...its better than another TNT vs. Horst debate!

    So......whats the real difference in responsiveness/steering quickness and climbing ability between the Flux and Spot?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedThrills
    So......whats the real difference in responsiveness/steering quickness and climbing ability between the Flux and Spot?
    I split my riding time between the Spot and Flux demos here. Both fantastic machines and it would be tough to choose just one. Fact is, they both do everything pretty darn well, especially if you spend your time on tight and rough singletrack. The Spot is a little shorter on top and longer on the bottom with a slacker head angle. It's a great bike in steep and technical terrain. I have to use a little body english climbing really steep rocky pitches on it, but overall, it's one of the best technical climbing bikes I've ever thrown a leg over. Turn the bike down hill and it really shines. The head angle, cockpit length, and wheelbase all come together descending. The faster and rougher the better.

    The Flux on the other hand, requires a tad more attention riding but is still a great all arounder. The cockpit is very comfortable if you prefer a more laid out position. I prefer the Flux on long extended climbs or on fast fire road ascents. It also handles better in tight woodsy singletrack and fast rolling terrain. For absolute technical climbing ability, though, I'd give the nod to the Spot - that extra inch allows for a greater margin of error. Anything else though, is a tough call. I prefer the Flux for more for all day epics that involve a varied mix of terrain, while I like the Spot for steep and rocky riding.

    Again, both great bikes - tough call.
    Redstone Cyclery
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  3. #3
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    I agree with everything ignazjr wrote. I had a Spot for five months and loved it. When it was stolen, I agonized over the decision to replace it with another Spot or to get a Flux. Since I need one bike to do everything, and I do some racing, I opted for the Flux. I've been very happy with my decision.

    That being said, if I never raced it would be the 5-Spot all the way.

    Here are my picks for Flux vs. Spot in the following scenarios...

    Hammering out of the saddle: Flux
    Technical climbing: Spot (ever so slightly better)
    All-around climbing: Flux
    Rocky, steep downhills: Spot
    Racing: Flux
    Jumping off stuff: Spot
    8-hour rides: Flux
    All-around, do everything bike: Spot (slightly better)

    Obviously it's a tough call, and honestly I hope to get a Spot again so I can pick and choose like ignazjr! Let us know which one you get.

    bock

  4. #4
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    I'm going to bring back this thread, as I can only have one Turner.

    I always hear people say to get the Spot for steep technical downhills. That sounds rather subjective to me. How steep is steep, and how technical is technical?

    My current riding playground is in Southern California in the Orange County and Riverside County area. When my bro-in-law gets back from SOCOM in mid-march, I plan on riding with him in the Santa Monica's. I plan on heading towards Big Bear to ride the Santa Ana River Trail. I live at the base of Bedford Motorway and climb that often. I'm coming from 13 years of steel hardtail riding, and I'm used to picking my lines on the climbs and obviously on the descents.

    A Flux frame will get built up immedietely. A Five Spot will take some time because I don't have disc hubs, and can't really afford to get a new wheelset right now. I can't afford to be a prima donna, but for some reason I am with parts, so Shimano Exage is out of the question.

    I'm only 155, so I'm thinking I could ride a Flux pretty darn hard and not worry about doing any damage to it.

    What to do?
    Last edited by royta; 02-12-2006 at 10:22 AM.

  5. #5
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    "A Flux frame will get built up immedietely. A Five Spot will take some time because I don't have disc hubs "

    Can't believe you'd buy a frame of the quality of the Flux and put rim brakes on it. Flux doesn't have caliper bosses on the seatstays so you'll have to save up for those new hubs whichever bike you buy.

  6. #6
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    Royta,

    I'm glad that you posted this question. I too am 155 lbs. and on the fence about the % Spot to Flux comparison. I've owned a 5 Spot in the past, but have never ridden a Flux. I'm wondering the same thing about the durability of the Flux as it sure would be nice to save the extra weight between the two frames.

    I'll stay tuned...

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    I don't see anything wrong with rim brakes on the flux. I know a lot of people that race that have high dollar frames and run rim brakes for the weight savings. Some times you have have to work with what you have. If I could only afford to get a flux with rim brakes I would do it in a heart beat. You can always upgrade later.


    I don't have my flux built up yet, but I am getting closer, so I can't really give too much testimony about the flux. I did do demo ride on one in Arkansas which lead me to buy one. The demo ride was magic, but that was only my second ride on a full suspension bike, and my current bike is a reliegh m-80, so imagine a lot of bikes would feel really great after spending a year on the m-80

    I will say part of me is concerned about it breaking on me, I weigh 135 pounds, but I really think what kind of rider you are makes more of a difference than weight. Part of me wishes I would have went with the spot, but my racing plans made me go for the flux.

    I wouldn't worry about putting bling parts on it. Upgrade gradually if that is what you can do. Either bike will be great.

  8. #8
    Mr.Secret
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    Quote Originally Posted by NealM
    "A Flux frame will get built up immedietely. A Five Spot will take some time because I don't have disc hubs "

    Can't believe you'd buy a frame of the quality of the Flux and put rim brakes on it. Flux doesn't have caliper bosses on the seatstays so you'll have to save up for those new hubs whichever bike you buy.
    I own both, Flux and 5-Spot. The Flux I have set up with v-brakes/Mavic ceramic rims.For ripping Ak. singletrack the v's have way more than enough whoa power, sometimes with the front, a tick too much.My riding weight is around 160 lbs. I absolutly don't feel like I'm degrading the quality of the Flux because of v's.I like to go fast all day, long sustained steep climbs, and have never felt at a lack for brakes on the descents. If I lived at altitude with sustained 1000 ft. plus descents, my choice of stoppers would probably be different. Sure discs are cool and most all work wonderfuly but ain't for everybody on all bikes.

  9. #9
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    search, search, search

    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    I'm going to bring back this thread, as I can only have one Turner.
    Why scrape up an old post when this has been covered many times?

    Just a few the search brings up:

    Flux v Spot

    Flux or 5Spot?

    UK - 5 spot vs flux

    5 spot vs flux vs Blur Lt

    Flux or 5 Spot?
    The red couch has moved from Alaska to Florida...

  10. #10
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    I own both a Flux and a Spot (I am living my dream ) and have a difficult time choosing the right weapon since both are really good. I find that climbing is faster on the Flux and it is more agile on tight singletrack but the Spot is definately more stable going downhill.

    To answer the question of what would be technical steep stuff, think stairs (the steep kind), you can do them on the Flux and sweat it a bit or do them on the Spot and not even think about it!

    Just last weekend I endoed on my Flux on a section that is a no brainer on the Spot... Wish I could ride the Flux up and come down on the Spot!

    Cheers

    elmadaleno
    "Hell, the Titus Moderator can't pass a cantina without gettin' the shakes"

  11. #11
    breathing helium
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    Thanks Chris! Looks like they are both great bikes, making the choice up to the desired style of riding. ...still doesn't make it an easy choice!

  12. #12
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    Coming off a steel hardtail.....

    I'd recommend the Flux.

    Of course, you should watch your spending habits, because by this time next year, you'll be scheming about how to get a Spot or RFX to complement the Flux!

  13. #13
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    think of it this way guys. if a nitrus is a f-1 car, then the flux is a indy car and the spot is a cup car. the flux is a rocket that will take a certain amount of heavy handedness where the spot is a tad heavyer, a bit slower and a whole lot tougher but not as stout as a rfx which is more like a desert race truck. can ya tell ive been watchin speed channel alot? if yer a h/t guy wantin to do the same rides, just faster and better, then buy the flux. if yer eyeballin those big jumps and drops, its time to add a spot to the family. god luck and stay in touch as things progress.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    ...if yer a h/t guy wantin to do the same rides, just faster and better, then buy the flux...
    I was ripping some local singletrack yesterday in the big ring (well, it was fast for me, I know it's relative) and as I'm being tossed about on my HT (thank god (or shimano?) for clipless pedals) I found myself thinking, "this trail would be sweet on a short travel fully, and way more comfortable, and I could go even faster!" So, of course, my thoughts turned to the Flux. What do you think, a clyde on a flux?

    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    if yer eyeballin those big jumps and drops, its time to add a spot to the family
    Yeah, I'm certainly eyeing those jumps and drops; that's where the RFX comes in. Or maybe Highline .

    Patrick
    Last edited by PCinSC; 02-12-2006 at 10:17 PM.

  15. #15
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    I am 200lbs and ride a Flux . . .I love the bike. It is quick and agile. I do not have any worries regarding durability.

  16. #16
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    I just bought a spot

    Just took my new spot for its first ride yesterday. I came from an XCE (more like a flux) and I would say that the spot is better in all areas of operation, no questiion. I will also race my spot so I have an RP3 to replace the dhx coil that is on there now for race day. I will also get a "race" wheelset and fork to make the spot a racer and a great all around trailbike. IMO I think it is easier to make a spot more like a flux than a flux more like a spot. Get the spot.

  17. #17
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    Another Clyde (or near-Clyde, I've been riding a lot lately) here. I've been on my Flux for over a year now, and the pivots and the rest of the frame are still tip-top. After riding the Flux this morning for the first time in a few weeks (I've been riding the 5 Spot because I've been wanting to push a heavier bike uphill for training), and it reminded me what a great singletrack bike it is. The Flux also helped me see the strength of the Spot in rougher terrain. The Flux forced me to pick my line a little bit more carefully through the rock gardens, but OMG, the smoother singletrack sections were so much fun.

    I would also agree with IdahoBiker's point about it being easier to turn the Spot into a Flux than vice-versa. DT had his Spot at 26 lbs. for a while.

  18. #18
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    AK Chris - Thanks for the links to the other threads.

    Anyway, after reading all of the linked threads, I still don't know which way to go. I'm coming back from a six year hiatus from riding (10 to 15 rides in the last six years) and my downhilling skills are not what they used to be. When the going gets steep and loose, I tend to unclip one foot for easy dabbing and I haven't been able to commit very well lately. It's probably a combination of tall saddle height, and not being used to the looseness of the terrain. I'm not even sure if I'd be able to use the 5 Spot for what it's capable of.

    I do feel the climb up is important, and I really appreciate a lighter bike. The majority of my fast downhills were on Northern California / Southern Oregon fireroads and were all done on a hardtail. I'd have to say the most technical downhill I've done was probably San Juan Trail in Southern California. I've done the Porcupine Rim Trail several times in 1994 and 1995, all on a hardtail and all times going as fast as I possibly could. Since it's been over 10 years since I've ridden in Moab, I don't recall exactly how technical it was, but I do recall I felt pretty darn good on my first hardtail, a Rockhopper (not sure of the head tube angle).

    I wish there were some Southern California riders that could help me out here. I've talked to Greg at Turner on Friday, and he felt the Flux could handle the trails that this area has to offer (Turner is about 30 miles south of me). This doesn't include leaving the trail in order to drop rocks though. I don't see myself going off the trail in order to take some drop. If it's in the trail in front of me, than I'd take it (to a point), but for the most part, I'm a pretty sane rider. More than likely because I was always on a hardtail.

    I've been staying up too late the last few nights over all of this Burner, Flux, and now, 5 Spot research.

  19. #19
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    i think ya just answered yer own question. sounds to me like theres a flux in yer future. theres gotta be some bikes in that area to test ride if yer still on the fence.
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    just so happens.....

    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    AK Chris - Thanks for the links to the other threads.

    Anyway, after reading all of the linked threads, I still don't know which way to go. I'm coming back from a six year hiatus from riding (10 to 15 rides in the last six years) and my downhilling skills are not what they used to be. When the going gets steep and loose, I tend to unclip one foot for easy dabbing and I haven't been able to commit very well lately. It's probably a combination of tall saddle height, and not being used to the looseness of the terrain. I'm not even sure if I'd be able to use the 5 Spot for what it's capable of.

    I do feel the climb up is important, and I really appreciate a lighter bike. The majority of my fast downhills were on Northern California / Southern Oregon fireroads and were all done on a hardtail. I'd have to say the most technical downhill I've done was probably San Juan Trail in Southern California. I've done the Porcupine Rim Trail several times in 1994 and 1995, all on a hardtail and all times going as fast as I possibly could. Since it's been over 10 years since I've ridden in Moab, I don't recall exactly how technical it was, but I do recall I felt pretty darn good on my first hardtail, a Rockhopper (not sure of the head tube angle).

    I wish there were some Southern California riders that could help me out here. I've talked to Greg at Turner on Friday, and he felt the Flux could handle the trails that this area has to offer (Turner is about 30 miles south of me). This doesn't include leaving the trail in order to drop rocks though. I don't see myself going off the trail in order to take some drop. If it's in the trail in front of me, than I'd take it (to a point), but for the most part, I'm a pretty sane rider. More than likely because I was always on a hardtail.

    I've been staying up too late the last few nights over all of this Burner, Flux, and now, 5 Spot research.

    I know where an XL flux is with super nice stuff on that you could score cheap. It probably has < 100 miles on it. PM me if you want more info.

  21. #21
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    XL? Well, it would have to be really cheap, so I could sell it and make a little money to buy a medium flux that would fit me. Thanks though.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    i think ya just answered yer own question. sounds to me like theres a flux in yer future.
    It does seem like it would make more sense. I just don't want a twitchy downhiller. I want the bike to inspire confidence in the downhill, while still being an excellent singletrack machine.

    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedThrills
    ...after speaking to DT himself and a good amount of Flux owners from all over the U.S., I think a lot of folks on this board are pigeonholing the Flux. It can do it all.
    link to above quote


    Quote Originally Posted by 2TurnersNotEnough
    Great points about the Flux. I sometimes forget that it really is a great trailbike, along with being a very capable race bike. It really depends on what is more important to you. The Spot is a ton of fun on the the descents, but it is not as lively a pedaler (though the difference is small). If your rides involve going quickly up and almost as quickly down, a Flux is great. If you rides are slightly slower up and bombing down, go for the Spot.
    link to above quote


    I'm hoping that what SpeedThrills and 2TurnersNotEnough said is accurate. If so, I think I should be more than happy with the Flux.

  23. #23
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    Hey Roy,
    Sorry that you missed out on the Burner since it would have saved you this agony..Flux vs Spot, that is.

    I second Cactus, I think I see a Flux in your future. I dont own one, but here is why I say this. One, rim brakes. As others have said, nothin wrong with them. If you can find the rear brake posts than go for it. On the Flux its no big deal, it can be a lightweight bike and many people race with it and yes there are still lots of racers that swear by their V's. On the Spot though, well I have to say I think V's are a compromise. I mean why bother to get the extra strength (and weight) of the Spot and then put V's on it which will mean you cannot stop as fast on those steeper downhills that everyone just told you about??? Discs are not inherently better than V's but for stopping a heavier bike, going faster on steep down hills - well discs are better here. Two, confidence - you just said you want something confidence inspiring since you are getting back into biking. As for reason One above, I dont see the Spot/V brake combo being helpful in that regard. Flux though, as it has been described by others is very racy but not so much so as other bikes that are more dedicated race bikes, ie Racer-X, Truth, etc. Why?? Because while the Flux can make a great race bike, it was never meant to be a dedicated racer. Nitrous is for that. The Flux was designed to be a 4x4 inch trailbike that was balanced and made for the typical mountain biker. As in not a budding hucker. In that respect DT designed it with a slightly slacher Head angle so that it would be more stable at speed and the downhills - so again I think you would find it confidence inspiring. Three, Proposed build. Add to that the fact that you will be building it up with lighter weight parts that you will be tranferring off your old bike. Flux+your build (rim brakes, leight weight wheels, etc) makes more sense than Spot+your build.

    Hope that helps with the decision process.

  24. #24
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    There is one problem though CDTofer. I don't plan on running v-brakes forever. I don't plan on running my RaceFace Turbine LC square drive crankset forever. Slowly but surely, I will be upgrading to modern components. On the Flux, and certainly with the Five Spot if I went that direction. I have found a few 130mm forks that can be had with v-brake bosses. This means I could build a Five Spot with my components, and do the upgrade. No, I wouldn't be able to use the Five Spot to it's full capability with v-brakes, but that would more than likely be the first upgrade.

    That's why I'm finding this decision to be quite complicated.

  25. #25
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    Flux with V's

    I have had a Flux since June, and I have only had V brakes on it.
    There doesn't seem to be a problem with me. I know everyone says discs are better, but I don't agree. More complications are possible with discs, and on epic rides in the middle of nowhere, V's I find much easier to fix. Just ask for some V brake bosses and slap em on. No problem.
    As for your choice, the Flux would be the better of the 2. I also agree with some of the other posters that the Flux is getting pigeon holed as a light almost race bike. If you built it differently, it could give you some of what the 5 spot does.
    I am still a hardtail guy, but my bike is "fun" and fast.
    I don't even have it grammed out and it weighs in at 25lbs.(gotta love the V's).
    It did well on S.A.R.T.
    GLTY
    paz afuera

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