Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 68

Thread: Flux vs. Spot

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    665

    Flux vs. Spot

    Im positive this has been covered, but time is short to grab an 05 Turner and no time for long research projects...and hey...its better than another TNT vs. Horst debate!

    So......whats the real difference in responsiveness/steering quickness and climbing ability between the Flux and Spot?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    ride
    Reputation: ignazjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,092
    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedThrills
    So......whats the real difference in responsiveness/steering quickness and climbing ability between the Flux and Spot?
    I split my riding time between the Spot and Flux demos here. Both fantastic machines and it would be tough to choose just one. Fact is, they both do everything pretty darn well, especially if you spend your time on tight and rough singletrack. The Spot is a little shorter on top and longer on the bottom with a slacker head angle. It's a great bike in steep and technical terrain. I have to use a little body english climbing really steep rocky pitches on it, but overall, it's one of the best technical climbing bikes I've ever thrown a leg over. Turn the bike down hill and it really shines. The head angle, cockpit length, and wheelbase all come together descending. The faster and rougher the better.

    The Flux on the other hand, requires a tad more attention riding but is still a great all arounder. The cockpit is very comfortable if you prefer a more laid out position. I prefer the Flux on long extended climbs or on fast fire road ascents. It also handles better in tight woodsy singletrack and fast rolling terrain. For absolute technical climbing ability, though, I'd give the nod to the Spot - that extra inch allows for a greater margin of error. Anything else though, is a tough call. I prefer the Flux for more for all day epics that involve a varied mix of terrain, while I like the Spot for steep and rocky riding.

    Again, both great bikes - tough call.
    Redstone Cyclery
    intense*transition*rocky mountain*turner
    web - tweet - FB
    Lyons, CO

  3. #3
    ...master of none
    Reputation: bock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    453
    I agree with everything ignazjr wrote. I had a Spot for five months and loved it. When it was stolen, I agonized over the decision to replace it with another Spot or to get a Flux. Since I need one bike to do everything, and I do some racing, I opted for the Flux. I've been very happy with my decision.

    That being said, if I never raced it would be the 5-Spot all the way.

    Here are my picks for Flux vs. Spot in the following scenarios...

    Hammering out of the saddle: Flux
    Technical climbing: Spot (ever so slightly better)
    All-around climbing: Flux
    Rocky, steep downhills: Spot
    Racing: Flux
    Jumping off stuff: Spot
    8-hour rides: Flux
    All-around, do everything bike: Spot (slightly better)

    Obviously it's a tough call, and honestly I hope to get a Spot again so I can pick and choose like ignazjr! Let us know which one you get.

    bock

  4. #4
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    I'm going to bring back this thread, as I can only have one Turner.

    I always hear people say to get the Spot for steep technical downhills. That sounds rather subjective to me. How steep is steep, and how technical is technical?

    My current riding playground is in Southern California in the Orange County and Riverside County area. When my bro-in-law gets back from SOCOM in mid-march, I plan on riding with him in the Santa Monica's. I plan on heading towards Big Bear to ride the Santa Ana River Trail. I live at the base of Bedford Motorway and climb that often. I'm coming from 13 years of steel hardtail riding, and I'm used to picking my lines on the climbs and obviously on the descents.

    A Flux frame will get built up immedietely. A Five Spot will take some time because I don't have disc hubs, and can't really afford to get a new wheelset right now. I can't afford to be a prima donna, but for some reason I am with parts, so Shimano Exage is out of the question.

    I'm only 155, so I'm thinking I could ride a Flux pretty darn hard and not worry about doing any damage to it.

    What to do?
    Last edited by royta; 02-12-2006 at 09:22 AM.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    96
    "A Flux frame will get built up immedietely. A Five Spot will take some time because I don't have disc hubs "

    Can't believe you'd buy a frame of the quality of the Flux and put rim brakes on it. Flux doesn't have caliper bosses on the seatstays so you'll have to save up for those new hubs whichever bike you buy.

  6. #6
    breathing helium
    Reputation: cocheese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,094
    Royta,

    I'm glad that you posted this question. I too am 155 lbs. and on the fence about the % Spot to Flux comparison. I've owned a 5 Spot in the past, but have never ridden a Flux. I'm wondering the same thing about the durability of the Flux as it sure would be nice to save the extra weight between the two frames.

    I'll stay tuned...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    332
    I don't see anything wrong with rim brakes on the flux. I know a lot of people that race that have high dollar frames and run rim brakes for the weight savings. Some times you have have to work with what you have. If I could only afford to get a flux with rim brakes I would do it in a heart beat. You can always upgrade later.


    I don't have my flux built up yet, but I am getting closer, so I can't really give too much testimony about the flux. I did do demo ride on one in Arkansas which lead me to buy one. The demo ride was magic, but that was only my second ride on a full suspension bike, and my current bike is a reliegh m-80, so imagine a lot of bikes would feel really great after spending a year on the m-80

    I will say part of me is concerned about it breaking on me, I weigh 135 pounds, but I really think what kind of rider you are makes more of a difference than weight. Part of me wishes I would have went with the spot, but my racing plans made me go for the flux.

    I wouldn't worry about putting bling parts on it. Upgrade gradually if that is what you can do. Either bike will be great.

  8. #8
    Mr.Secret
    Reputation: R.T.R.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by NealM
    "A Flux frame will get built up immedietely. A Five Spot will take some time because I don't have disc hubs "

    Can't believe you'd buy a frame of the quality of the Flux and put rim brakes on it. Flux doesn't have caliper bosses on the seatstays so you'll have to save up for those new hubs whichever bike you buy.
    I own both, Flux and 5-Spot. The Flux I have set up with v-brakes/Mavic ceramic rims.For ripping Ak. singletrack the v's have way more than enough whoa power, sometimes with the front, a tick too much.My riding weight is around 160 lbs. I absolutly don't feel like I'm degrading the quality of the Flux because of v's.I like to go fast all day, long sustained steep climbs, and have never felt at a lack for brakes on the descents. If I lived at altitude with sustained 1000 ft. plus descents, my choice of stoppers would probably be different. Sure discs are cool and most all work wonderfuly but ain't for everybody on all bikes.

  9. #9
    Baked Alaskan
    Reputation: AK Chris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,812

    search, search, search

    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    I'm going to bring back this thread, as I can only have one Turner.
    Why scrape up an old post when this has been covered many times?

    Just a few the search brings up:

    Flux v Spot

    Flux or 5Spot?

    UK - 5 spot vs flux

    5 spot vs flux vs Blur Lt

    Flux or 5 Spot?
    The red couch has moved from Alaska to Florida...

  10. #10
    Mexican e-rider
    Reputation: elmadaleno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    977
    I own both a Flux and a Spot (I am living my dream ) and have a difficult time choosing the right weapon since both are really good. I find that climbing is faster on the Flux and it is more agile on tight singletrack but the Spot is definately more stable going downhill.

    To answer the question of what would be technical steep stuff, think stairs (the steep kind), you can do them on the Flux and sweat it a bit or do them on the Spot and not even think about it!

    Just last weekend I endoed on my Flux on a section that is a no brainer on the Spot... Wish I could ride the Flux up and come down on the Spot!

    Cheers

    elmadaleno
    "Hell, the Titus Moderator can't pass a cantina without gettin' the shakes"

  11. #11
    breathing helium
    Reputation: cocheese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,094
    Thanks Chris! Looks like they are both great bikes, making the choice up to the desired style of riding. ...still doesn't make it an easy choice!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,425

    Coming off a steel hardtail.....

    I'd recommend the Flux.

    Of course, you should watch your spending habits, because by this time next year, you'll be scheming about how to get a Spot or RFX to complement the Flux!

  13. #13
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,942
    think of it this way guys. if a nitrus is a f-1 car, then the flux is a indy car and the spot is a cup car. the flux is a rocket that will take a certain amount of heavy handedness where the spot is a tad heavyer, a bit slower and a whole lot tougher but not as stout as a rfx which is more like a desert race truck. can ya tell ive been watchin speed channel alot? if yer a h/t guy wantin to do the same rides, just faster and better, then buy the flux. if yer eyeballin those big jumps and drops, its time to add a spot to the family. god luck and stay in touch as things progress.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  14. #14
    long standing member
    Reputation: PCinSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,093
    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    ...if yer a h/t guy wantin to do the same rides, just faster and better, then buy the flux...
    I was ripping some local singletrack yesterday in the big ring (well, it was fast for me, I know it's relative) and as I'm being tossed about on my HT (thank god (or shimano?) for clipless pedals) I found myself thinking, "this trail would be sweet on a short travel fully, and way more comfortable, and I could go even faster!" So, of course, my thoughts turned to the Flux. What do you think, a clyde on a flux?

    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    if yer eyeballin those big jumps and drops, its time to add a spot to the family
    Yeah, I'm certainly eyeing those jumps and drops; that's where the RFX comes in. Or maybe Highline .

    Patrick
    Last edited by PCinSC; 02-12-2006 at 09:17 PM.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    996
    I am 200lbs and ride a Flux . . .I love the bike. It is quick and agile. I do not have any worries regarding durability.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    208

    I just bought a spot

    Just took my new spot for its first ride yesterday. I came from an XCE (more like a flux) and I would say that the spot is better in all areas of operation, no questiion. I will also race my spot so I have an RP3 to replace the dhx coil that is on there now for race day. I will also get a "race" wheelset and fork to make the spot a racer and a great all around trailbike. IMO I think it is easier to make a spot more like a flux than a flux more like a spot. Get the spot.

  17. #17
    Pixie Dust Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,342
    Another Clyde (or near-Clyde, I've been riding a lot lately) here. I've been on my Flux for over a year now, and the pivots and the rest of the frame are still tip-top. After riding the Flux this morning for the first time in a few weeks (I've been riding the 5 Spot because I've been wanting to push a heavier bike uphill for training), and it reminded me what a great singletrack bike it is. The Flux also helped me see the strength of the Spot in rougher terrain. The Flux forced me to pick my line a little bit more carefully through the rock gardens, but OMG, the smoother singletrack sections were so much fun.

    I would also agree with IdahoBiker's point about it being easier to turn the Spot into a Flux than vice-versa. DT had his Spot at 26 lbs. for a while.

  18. #18
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    AK Chris - Thanks for the links to the other threads.

    Anyway, after reading all of the linked threads, I still don't know which way to go. I'm coming back from a six year hiatus from riding (10 to 15 rides in the last six years) and my downhilling skills are not what they used to be. When the going gets steep and loose, I tend to unclip one foot for easy dabbing and I haven't been able to commit very well lately. It's probably a combination of tall saddle height, and not being used to the looseness of the terrain. I'm not even sure if I'd be able to use the 5 Spot for what it's capable of.

    I do feel the climb up is important, and I really appreciate a lighter bike. The majority of my fast downhills were on Northern California / Southern Oregon fireroads and were all done on a hardtail. I'd have to say the most technical downhill I've done was probably San Juan Trail in Southern California. I've done the Porcupine Rim Trail several times in 1994 and 1995, all on a hardtail and all times going as fast as I possibly could. Since it's been over 10 years since I've ridden in Moab, I don't recall exactly how technical it was, but I do recall I felt pretty darn good on my first hardtail, a Rockhopper (not sure of the head tube angle).

    I wish there were some Southern California riders that could help me out here. I've talked to Greg at Turner on Friday, and he felt the Flux could handle the trails that this area has to offer (Turner is about 30 miles south of me). This doesn't include leaving the trail in order to drop rocks though. I don't see myself going off the trail in order to take some drop. If it's in the trail in front of me, than I'd take it (to a point), but for the most part, I'm a pretty sane rider. More than likely because I was always on a hardtail.

    I've been staying up too late the last few nights over all of this Burner, Flux, and now, 5 Spot research.

  19. #19
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,942
    i think ya just answered yer own question. sounds to me like theres a flux in yer future. theres gotta be some bikes in that area to test ride if yer still on the fence.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    208

    just so happens.....

    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    AK Chris - Thanks for the links to the other threads.

    Anyway, after reading all of the linked threads, I still don't know which way to go. I'm coming back from a six year hiatus from riding (10 to 15 rides in the last six years) and my downhilling skills are not what they used to be. When the going gets steep and loose, I tend to unclip one foot for easy dabbing and I haven't been able to commit very well lately. It's probably a combination of tall saddle height, and not being used to the looseness of the terrain. I'm not even sure if I'd be able to use the 5 Spot for what it's capable of.

    I do feel the climb up is important, and I really appreciate a lighter bike. The majority of my fast downhills were on Northern California / Southern Oregon fireroads and were all done on a hardtail. I'd have to say the most technical downhill I've done was probably San Juan Trail in Southern California. I've done the Porcupine Rim Trail several times in 1994 and 1995, all on a hardtail and all times going as fast as I possibly could. Since it's been over 10 years since I've ridden in Moab, I don't recall exactly how technical it was, but I do recall I felt pretty darn good on my first hardtail, a Rockhopper (not sure of the head tube angle).

    I wish there were some Southern California riders that could help me out here. I've talked to Greg at Turner on Friday, and he felt the Flux could handle the trails that this area has to offer (Turner is about 30 miles south of me). This doesn't include leaving the trail in order to drop rocks though. I don't see myself going off the trail in order to take some drop. If it's in the trail in front of me, than I'd take it (to a point), but for the most part, I'm a pretty sane rider. More than likely because I was always on a hardtail.

    I've been staying up too late the last few nights over all of this Burner, Flux, and now, 5 Spot research.

    I know where an XL flux is with super nice stuff on that you could score cheap. It probably has < 100 miles on it. PM me if you want more info.

  21. #21
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    XL? Well, it would have to be really cheap, so I could sell it and make a little money to buy a medium flux that would fit me. Thanks though.

  22. #22
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    Quote Originally Posted by cactuscorn
    i think ya just answered yer own question. sounds to me like theres a flux in yer future.
    It does seem like it would make more sense. I just don't want a twitchy downhiller. I want the bike to inspire confidence in the downhill, while still being an excellent singletrack machine.

    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedThrills
    ...after speaking to DT himself and a good amount of Flux owners from all over the U.S., I think a lot of folks on this board are pigeonholing the Flux. It can do it all.
    link to above quote


    Quote Originally Posted by 2TurnersNotEnough
    Great points about the Flux. I sometimes forget that it really is a great trailbike, along with being a very capable race bike. It really depends on what is more important to you. The Spot is a ton of fun on the the descents, but it is not as lively a pedaler (though the difference is small). If your rides involve going quickly up and almost as quickly down, a Flux is great. If you rides are slightly slower up and bombing down, go for the Spot.
    link to above quote


    I'm hoping that what SpeedThrills and 2TurnersNotEnough said is accurate. If so, I think I should be more than happy with the Flux.

  23. #23
    ...
    Reputation: CDtofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,319
    Hey Roy,
    Sorry that you missed out on the Burner since it would have saved you this agony..Flux vs Spot, that is.

    I second Cactus, I think I see a Flux in your future. I dont own one, but here is why I say this. One, rim brakes. As others have said, nothin wrong with them. If you can find the rear brake posts than go for it. On the Flux its no big deal, it can be a lightweight bike and many people race with it and yes there are still lots of racers that swear by their V's. On the Spot though, well I have to say I think V's are a compromise. I mean why bother to get the extra strength (and weight) of the Spot and then put V's on it which will mean you cannot stop as fast on those steeper downhills that everyone just told you about??? Discs are not inherently better than V's but for stopping a heavier bike, going faster on steep down hills - well discs are better here. Two, confidence - you just said you want something confidence inspiring since you are getting back into biking. As for reason One above, I dont see the Spot/V brake combo being helpful in that regard. Flux though, as it has been described by others is very racy but not so much so as other bikes that are more dedicated race bikes, ie Racer-X, Truth, etc. Why?? Because while the Flux can make a great race bike, it was never meant to be a dedicated racer. Nitrous is for that. The Flux was designed to be a 4x4 inch trailbike that was balanced and made for the typical mountain biker. As in not a budding hucker. In that respect DT designed it with a slightly slacher Head angle so that it would be more stable at speed and the downhills - so again I think you would find it confidence inspiring. Three, Proposed build. Add to that the fact that you will be building it up with lighter weight parts that you will be tranferring off your old bike. Flux+your build (rim brakes, leight weight wheels, etc) makes more sense than Spot+your build.

    Hope that helps with the decision process.

  24. #24
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    There is one problem though CDTofer. I don't plan on running v-brakes forever. I don't plan on running my RaceFace Turbine LC square drive crankset forever. Slowly but surely, I will be upgrading to modern components. On the Flux, and certainly with the Five Spot if I went that direction. I have found a few 130mm forks that can be had with v-brake bosses. This means I could build a Five Spot with my components, and do the upgrade. No, I wouldn't be able to use the Five Spot to it's full capability with v-brakes, but that would more than likely be the first upgrade.

    That's why I'm finding this decision to be quite complicated.

  25. #25
    Believer in Darwin
    Reputation: papisimo11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    273

    Flux with V's

    I have had a Flux since June, and I have only had V brakes on it.
    There doesn't seem to be a problem with me. I know everyone says discs are better, but I don't agree. More complications are possible with discs, and on epic rides in the middle of nowhere, V's I find much easier to fix. Just ask for some V brake bosses and slap em on. No problem.
    As for your choice, the Flux would be the better of the 2. I also agree with some of the other posters that the Flux is getting pigeon holed as a light almost race bike. If you built it differently, it could give you some of what the 5 spot does.
    I am still a hardtail guy, but my bike is "fun" and fast.
    I don't even have it grammed out and it weighs in at 25lbs.(gotta love the V's).
    It did well on S.A.R.T.
    GLTY
    paz afuera

  26. #26
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    I just measured the wheelbase on my current bike. It measures around 41.75" and it has the typical old school XC angles of 71 / 73. A Flux is going to feel like a downhilling rocket ship to me.

  27. #27
    Mr.Secret
    Reputation: R.T.R.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    613

    Good job!

    You're reeaaalllly gonna' dig the Flux........

  28. #28
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    Do I try and find an '05 (new or lightly used), or do I just buy an '06 today? An '05 could be slightly nostalgic being the only HL Flux.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    135

    Get the Flux

    I have had my Flux for about 10 months now, and I can't beleave how great it is downhill. I came from a XCE, the Flux climbs and decends better. the Flux just flows on smooth singletrack. I am a agressive rider and have no trouble ripping down upper and lower Sam Merrill trail here in Pasadena. I see alot of downhill bikes on upper trail so it is pretty technical. I can make it down no problem and the bike climbs to the top great. You won't regret it. I also have a Nitrios it climbs great but you can feel that it is made for racing on too aggresive downhill trails.
    Good Luck, ED

  30. #30
    Mr.Secret
    Reputation: R.T.R.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    613
    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    Do I try and find an '05 (new or lightly used), or do I just buy an '06 today? An '05 could be slightly nostalgic being the only HL Flux.
    TNT vs HL, no big deal. Go for that ' 06 orange ano.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    135
    Quote Originally Posted by R.T.R.
    TNT vs HL, no big deal. Go for that ' 06 orange ano.
    It is the HL rear end. That orange ano is pretty sweet, I would have picked that color if it was available.

    Ed

  32. #32
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,942
    just order the '06 royta. the h/l vs tnt thing is not worth the trouble of the search according to 99.99% of those whove ridden it. id glady give up my h/l for a tnt without a 2nd thought. i trust em that much.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  33. #33
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    When I buy the Flux, am I going to have buyer's remorse and wish I had purchased the Spot? I started riding in 1993, and both my bikes have been steel hardtails. The Flux should easily handle all the the trails in the Santa Ana's (SoCal), shouldn't it? I'm getting back into riding again, and have only done a few of the rides in the Santa Ana's. Mostly fireroad climbs so I can get strengthen my legs. The non-climb rides I've done would be Whiting / Cactus, which is a walk in the park, no real need for FS there. I did San Juan as a shuttle from Blue Jay with some friends who have their bikes set up for DH. I did feel that at the speeds I was going, I could certainly shorten the life span of my sub 4 pound steel hardtail frame. It was real bouncy on the downs, and I was suffering from massive forearm pump. Heck, just going down Skyline on this loop I did a couple Saturday's ago was bouncy. I doubt I'm going to get into drops. I can build up the Flux right away, because I can transfer practically everything over from my existing frame. I only need a fork, front derailleur, stem, and bars. I picked up some v-brake bosses from somebody in OC, so I'll run my v-brakes until I have some new hubs/rims built up. My current set are the White Industries Tracker / Ti Cassette w/ Mavic 217 rims, 15 gauge spokes and alloy nipps. I prefer the lighter builds, but I want to make sure the Flux will handle the Santa Ana trails, giving me comfort at high speeds.

    Why am I making this so difficult?

  34. #34
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,942
    theres gonna be days ya wish ya had the other no matter what ya chose. i know i do. even with my old rfx i wish i had a spot and i might by years end. that doesnt mean i dont totally dig my flux. i would never trade it, just add another bike to it. this might not answer yer question but it might clear some of the air for ya.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  35. #35
    Mr.Secret
    Reputation: R.T.R.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    613
    Buyers remorse? I really doubt it. Coming off a hardtail onto a state of the art, do just about anything ya want to, not counting freeride schtuff, 4in. travel bike, you'll love it.It's gonna' whip and stick the corners, probably outclimb, and definatly out descend your current ride. Just think, you're going from 0 ins. travel in the rear to 4. You won't regret it.

  36. #36
    ride
    Reputation: ignazjr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,092
    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    When I buy the Flux, am I going to have buyer's remorse and wish I had purchased the Spot?

    Why am I making this so difficult?
    If you're not into big drops and shuttling downhill, the Flux will be able to take about anything you'll hit. I've got both here as demos and I've spent a lot of time on each. I don't shuttle or hit the lifts, just some CO mountain riding. A lot of it is unmaintained backcountry stuff - rocks, roots, steep terrain, etc. The 5 Spot is a more comfortable bike to ride in that terrain, but either bike handles it well.

    Keep in mind, also, that the Flux is going to handle a little slower than what you're on. A medium Flux will have a wheelbase that's about 1.5 inches longer than what you're riding now. A medium 5 Spot will be .6 inches longer than that and it has a 69 degree head angle. The Spot's numbers are great if you're looking for a bike that will be stable at speed and on steep terrain. If you're looking for a swift singletrack machine on moderate terrain, though, the Spot can be overkill despite how light you build it.

    I've had some good feedback on this issue from folks taking out the demo bikes here. I have had a lot of riders comment that the Spot was way too long for the tight and swoopy trails they ride. Most of those riders end up going with the Flux.
    Redstone Cyclery
    intense*transition*rocky mountain*turner
    web - tweet - FB
    Lyons, CO

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    79

    I like the Spot

    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    There is one problem though CDTofer. I don't plan on running v-brakes forever. I don't plan on running my RaceFace Turbine LC square drive crankset forever. Slowly but surely, I will be upgrading to modern components. On the Flux, and certainly with the Five Spot if I went that direction. I have found a few 130mm forks that can be had with v-brake bosses. This means I could build a Five Spot with my components, and do the upgrade. No, I wouldn't be able to use the Five Spot to it's full capability with v-brakes, but that would more than likely be the first upgrade.

    That's why I'm finding this decision to be quite complicated.
    I am a SoCal rider and I chose the Spot. My build is on the light side 27-28lbs. for a large frame. I went with the Spot because of its geometry. I don't race and I weigh 190 so the weight difference wasn't too much of a concern.

  38. #38
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    Code:
    <p align="left"><font size="4">Taken from the page 44 of the March 2006 issue of MBA</font></p>
    <p align="left"><b><font size="4">The TrailBike</font></b><br>
    <b>Intended use:</b>&nbsp; A trailbike is the best choice for the vast majority of riders.<br>
    Suspension travel ranges from four to five inches, although the trailbike definition<br>
    can include hardtails.  Climbing and pedal efficiency remain job one for this<br>
    category, but there is more emphasis on technical handling skills, durability and<br>
    comfort.<br>
    <br>
    <b>Weight range:</b>&nbsp; 25 to 32 pounds<br>
    <br>
    <b>Maximum abuse level:&nbsp;</b> An aggressive riding style, including jumps with soft<br>
    transitions and drops (three feet or less) associated with technical cross-country<br>
    riding.  These bikes can travel at higher speeds over rougher, more technical<br>
    terrain than a cross-country bike can handle.<br>
    <br>
    <b>What it is not:</b>&nbsp; Suitable for downhill, aggressive black-diamond trail riding,<br>
    jumping or stunts.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <font size="4"><b>The Minimalist Approach</b></font><br>
    <b>Intended Use:</b>&nbsp; The cross-country racing platform is a lightweight hardtail,<br>
    softtail or a dual-suspension chassis with three inches (or less) of travel. It is<br>
    designed for pedaling and climbing efficiency. It should be ridden by an intelligent<br>
    rider on prepared race circuits, dirt roads and maintained trails. Weight is a major<br>
    design issue, so the best cross-country racers border on fragile and will not<br>
    withstand repeated rider errors (hard, flat landings; solid impacts into trail<br>
    obstacles or g-outs into transitions). Constant attention to routine maintenance<br>
    is not just recommended, it is required.<br>
    <br>
    <b>Weight range:</b>&nbsp; 19 to 27 pounds<br>
    <br>
    <b>Maximum abuse level:&nbsp; </b>Bunny hopping trail obstacles, minimal jumping to<br>
    smooth transitions and moderate technical terrain.
    <b><br>
    <br>
    <b>What it is not:</b>&nbsp; </b>Durable, comfortable, crashworthy, or suited for aggressive<br>
    riding.</p>
    Dave Turner calls the Flux a cross country bike, but it certainly doesn't fall under MBA's classification of a cross country racing bike, does it? I'm guessing under MBA's classification, the Flux falls under the trail bike category, but not quite as deep in as the 5 Spot would. What do you all think?
    Last edited by royta; 02-20-2006 at 10:44 AM.

  39. #39
    Pixie Dust Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,342
    I would call the Flux a lightweight trailbike that is race-capable. When I went to a 24 hour race last year, I saw three Fluxes there (one of them was mine), and the other two were being raced by solo racers. The additional comfort from the less extreme riding position and more plush suspension of the Flux vs. a true X-C racer makes it a good choice for endurance events.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    996
    I believe MBA classified it as a 4" travel trail bike. I think there was a page that listed trail bike frames. I would agree the Flux is a raceable trail bike.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: miles e's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,946
    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    Dave Turner calls the Flux a cross country bike, but it certainly doesn't fall under MBA's classification of a cross country racing bike, does it? I'm guessing under MBA's classification, the Flux falls under the trail bike category, but not quite as deep in as the 5 Spot would. What do you all think?
    It's either. Or both. It's like those electrons that are constantly in motion and cannot be pinned down (i.e. in a state of Flux). It's a great trail bike for less technical trails, or a great race bike for more techincal race courses.

    It's not the definitive race bike that the Nitrous is, nor does it have the legendary trailbike reputation as the 5 Spot. It takes the best elements of each (light weight & agility of the Nitrous, suspension performance & stability of the Spot) and gives them to you in one neat package.
    ''It seems like a bit of a trend, everyone trying to make things longer over the last couple of years" Sam Hill

  42. #42
    \|/Home of the Braves\|/
    Reputation: RedRocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,927
    Why does it matter what MBA says?
    Big hoopy.
    Turner Sultan / On One Inbred

  43. #43
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    Quote Originally Posted by RedRocker
    Why does it matter what MBA says?
    It really doesn't, especially considering the last review I read said the Murray Road Warrior cornered like it was on rails.

    It's just that I keep having my doubts and just want to make sure I'm buying the right bike. I'd have the same doubts if it were the 5 Spot I wanted, except I'd be worried that it would be too much bike for what I really need.

  44. #44
    ...
    Reputation: CDtofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,319
    Roy,
    Boy you are not kidding with that 'over researcher' tagline...

    Using that sheet from MBA as a guideline the Flux is a trailbike. For some perspective (since you have been out of the game for a while) a 4 and 4 inch (fr and rr travel) used to be long travel until maybe three years ago when the first platform shocks started to come out. Then somebody found that you could run a 5 or 6 inch travel bike that almost rode like a shorter travel bike. The key word in that sentence is almost - not taking anything away from the likes of the Spot - but the extra weight and inch of travel are not always the best thing. Not if you dont need it. Me personally I would love it, but then I think I should jump off the occasional lip and think that every now and then a 2-3 foot drop (with a tranny) is fine. Even on a Burner Thats just me and I know I can ride the occasional drop even on a hard tail. Having said that I probably should have a bigger bike, and I know there is one in my future.

    You yourself have said on multiple occasions that your tires are not gonna leave the ground except to put the bike in the car. You have said you wont be leaving the trail to go play on the rocks. If thats the case the Flux is more than enough bike for you, both now with V-brakes and later with discs. It is a trail bike even by DTs standards - I think he originally felt it was the perfect bike for the majority of bikers (I read something like this somewhere) and it will be a very confidence inspiring bike. It has a slight slacker Head angle and a slightly longer wheelbase than your hardtail or a dedicated short-travel race bike. It will most likely be all the bike you ever need. (especially if you are a little bit old-school) I think you can be safe with your decision to go Flux - I can gaurantee you will be happy.

    So I think the only reason to keep coming back to this is that you are on the fence and even though you dont think you need that much of a bike, you are hoping people on this board will push you to get a Spot. Maybe this is what you secretly desire and need a little 'helping' to get there. Of course there would be nothing wrong with this if that is the case.

    Still, I think you do not have to worry at all if the Flux will be enough bike for you. I dont personally own one but I know that my Burner is both confidence inspiring for the reasons I mentioned above plus it is very stiff laterally which I really notice (and like) I can just about gaurantee you do not have to worry about the Flux in a durability sort of way. The frame will be more than strong enough for its intended purpose, and the bushings plus the general solidness that DT builds in to his frames gaurantee long life.

    Coming from a hardtail I think you will be pleasantly suprised how much a 4x4 inch suspension bike can handle.

    Good luck with your choice,
    Chris

  45. #45
    over researcher
    Reputation: royta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,163
    I will admit that I am slightly on the fence between the two. In years past, I've done the occasional 1 to 1 1/2 (stretching it) foot drop on a hardtail, but it was while traveling down hill on single track, and landing on the same plane, only 1 to 1 1/2 feet lower. Nice & easy on the bike. I'll also hit the bumps and catch a small bit of air on fire roads, but It's certainly nothing to say, "whoa dude" over.

    I would be interested to know exactly how much use (abuse) a Flux could in fact handle by a 150 to 160 pound rider, just to set my mind at ease.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    665
    Roy...the Flux is a good, strong frame. It can take the beating the riding you described just fine. That type of riding is well within the bike's envelope.

    Ive ridden my Flux so far on smooth singletrack here on Long Island and over some really NASTY stuff up in Westchester. Steep, rocky rooty, fast downhills ,climbs, over logs, etc.. The bike has shined in all areas and NEVER felt out of place. Sure...some areas were handled better than others. The guys on their 8" Foes went faster down the hills. DUH. But I dont want an 8" Foes. Knowing my riding style, I wanted a faster short-travel trailbike. The Flux is just that.

    Again, the key is.....HOW DO YOU RIDE???? WHAT IS YOUR STYLE?????

    THAT is the deciding factor...not much else.

  47. #47
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    12,942
    roy. buy the friggin flux already. its a perfect fit for yer needs if yer turner bound. if ya want a spot that bad, buy it. we wont hate you for it. but fer cryin out loud either jako or get off the pot.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  48. #48
    Toby Wong?
    Reputation: Tappoix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,307
    coming from hardtail, it'll be 2 years at least before you're really riding the bike to it's full potential...which is a good thing

    so get the bike you want

    either way you're going to end up a super happy and transformed rider and you can't go wrong it's a Turner

  49. #49
    \|/Home of the Braves\|/
    Reputation: RedRocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,927
    Quote Originally Posted by royta
    It really doesn't, especially considering the last review I read said the Murray Road Warrior cornered like it was on rails.

    It's just that I keep having my doubts and just want to make sure I'm buying the right bike. I'd have the same doubts if it were the 5 Spot I wanted, except I'd be worried that it would be too much bike for what I really need.
    I went throught the same decision yesterday. Honestly, as stated above, it's a transition from a HT to FS. That said, as you get used to it you will find youself doing more than you thought you would as you "grow into it". Based on everything I've read, ridden, or been told the Spot gives you more abilities with fewer limits. Heck, I may race mine a couple times this year for fun
    Either way "you can't go wrong it's a Turner". They are fabulous bikes and better people.
    Big hoopy.
    Turner Sultan / On One Inbred

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    665
    Quote Originally Posted by RedRocker
    I went throught the same decision yesterday. Honestly, as stated above, it's a transition from a HT to FS. That said, as you get used to it you will find youself doing more than you thought you would as you "grow into it". Based on everything I've read, ridden, or been told the Spot gives you more abilities with fewer limits. Heck, I may race mine a couple times this year for fun
    Either way "you can't go wrong it's a Turner". They are fabulous bikes and better people.
    See, I went Flux for the same reasons stated above, that how it performs more-closely fits my style of riding and what type of bike I prefer (light and responsive).

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •