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  1. #1
    Nicole? Papa?
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    Do you think that 2007 Spots have a better or worse than average standover height?

    As above.

  2. #2
    trail fairy
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    is this a trick question..
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  3. #3
    Nicole? Papa?
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    Sorry, mate it's not.

    I've not built my Large Spot up yet, just wondering how it'll compare to my old bike, is all.


  4. #4
    trail fairy
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    GeeTee excuse my humour or lack there, Im scrambled eggs and hyper hooped on the meds!

    I have no idea on the speccy I have phobia's about the big S and my browser won't transmit to there IP address

    Turners Ive had to go through the back door thanx to me ole Pal CC


    Here ya go, entry admitted

    http://www.turnerbikes.com/08fivespot.html

    Oh mine has great standover, something I never really consider on a bike though, its more important for me to get the fit right, standover is a form of crutch lol..

    They do Spots have a low slopping TT and despite what some say about the top tube cable routing its the best Ive come across simple to work on clean and never bothered me once, Ive always run nokons, or full housings.

    Chur ta..

    Dam that pic is hard on me eyes..
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  5. #5
    Nicole? Papa?
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    TA, don't apologise!

    I knew I'd sully the good name of the forum if I posted a Spesh ;-)

    Can you tell me more about the low slopping TT Spots?

    I have to say, I've drilled out the stops to run full outers, but aesthetically (and for the reason that it's comfier to sit on the top tube when you're having a rest - which is massively important!) I'd prefer the TT cables to run under rather than over.

    I seem to remember something about DT changing to full outers on the Spot and running them under in future - or am I dreaming??? ;-)

  6. #6
    Nicole? Papa?
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    Strange, I just managed to find the geometry chart for the Stumpy and according to that, the Large has a 28" standover, which is 4" shorter than the large 5 Spot at 32".

    How can that be???

  7. #7
    trail fairy
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeeTee
    Strange, I just managed to find the geometry chart for the Stumpy and according to that, the Large has a 28" standover, which is 4" shorter than the large 5 Spot at 32".

    How can that be???
    Im not the best to talk to about that corporate brand mobile, but Spec have always cructhed up there bottom brackets and are very low, if standover is ya thing then Im not surprised at all theyre lowerl, numbers alone never tell the story, but Im also not going to sell the Spot it does that on its own, once its in ya stable there's little that will ever come close, Ive had to eat humble pie more than a few times about that, and I happily do so cause in the end Iwas the winner on the day by making the switch to such a fine gal and shes never let me down.

    I can sit on the TT if needed never bothers me its more athestics that hang people up re the TT there's no form issue, like most things its easy to pull and pick but until ya owned one its realy hard to comment again I made that mistake, now I have two of em I really like the fact theyre so easy to work with not that much is needed once theyre built sorta set and forget, more ride time less talking about it, but when ya want too the job is made so easy in the bike stand, Ive worked on allot of bikes and these are a pleasure to build up or maintain and clean..

    Cable routing there's no not even a comparison I am not a fan of under the down tube cable routing the most stupidist place in mtb to run cables, fully exposed to crap, ya gonna hit something the cables gonna to take a beating, hanging ya FD cable under the BB like that shows the lack of attention to detail and little thought for the intended purpose, Ive worked on enough of those to know how that ends up! it still amazes me MTB brands still do this, not only does it look dam aweful its very poor execution, and a hang over from XC HT days, not smart at all least for full suspension bikes where there's allot of movement around the BB or linkage area, major reason for ghosting, chain suck and high levels of maintenance on cables, affects shifting etc, none of which Ive suffered on the Turners and a couple of other high end frames Ive owned, even Giant have got there cable routing sorted so shows a big brand can work it out, as difficult as it is lol.

    If ya can Gee find an LBS where ya can see the bike ya interested in built up sit on it standover it if poss test ride one, if not there's not allot more other than deciding wether ya want to take a shot, but there's not many brands ya could put more blind fatih in imo, CS is the best out there and loyalty is hard to beat, numbers are a guide its the ride that counts..

    Good luck ta..
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  8. #8
    Nicole? Papa?
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    Boy, great post TA!! I'm feeling what you are saying. I have virtually all the parts for my 5 Spot build, just need 1 or 2 more, then it'll be couch shot time!

  9. #9
    trail fairy
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeeTee
    Boy, great post TA!! I'm feeling what you are saying. I have virtually all the parts for my 5 Spot build, just need 1 or 2 more, then it'll be couch shot time!
    Chur bud, looking fwd to seeing ya piccs
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  10. #10
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    soiling milk

    The pursuit of excessive standover is no different than the pursuit of the lightest trail or AM bikes, marketing BS.

    I am barely 5'8'' tall, when I buy pants I get the 30" length and ride a 2003 medium Spot with a Pike and 2008 rear triangle with 2.35 tires. No belly dragger for sure and yesterday I had ample opportunity to do the straddle waddle on numerous failed tech sections on the climb. I can happily say that my sack is intact, not a scratch in fact. BUT, the tops of my thighs are bruised from both legs hitting the shifters on one of the moderate speed technical sections failures! Thankfully my stem did not whack the sack, but in the 25 years I have been a mountain bike rider I have NEVER hit my crotch to the point of injury on any bike ever, even the old school steel bikes with short seat posts and high top tubes. I have hit my crotch on the stem, but that is not the TT, that is a fixed part and I would have hit the stem even if I was riding a girls bike. I have needed stitches from hitting my knee on the controls as I go over the bars, but never injury from nuts to top tube.

    Maybe I should change my marketing from tough long lasting bikes to preying on fear and weakness? Fear of whacking crotches on top tubes and the weak that worry about less than 1/2% of vehicle weight in their next frame purchace.

    Anyone else have top tube stories to tell?

    DT

  11. #11
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Stand over heights do not truly shrink in proportion to rider height as you go down in size imo. Smaller riders have it harder than larger riders. Barny (shortish inseam for her 5' 6") is less likely to attack a really hard climb if she is worried about not making it and racking her nads (metaphorically speaking) on the tt of her Pack when the time comes to clip out. I have no issues on mine. Putting the cable clutter on the underside of the tube would help a little.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  12. #12
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    Maybe some people have bigger balls!

  13. #13
    Paper or plastic?
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes
    The pursuit of excessive standover is no different than the pursuit of the lightest trail or AM bikes, marketing BS.

    I am barely 5'8'' tall, when I buy pants I get the 30" length and ride a 2003 medium Spot with a Pike and 2008 rear triangle with 2.35 tires. No belly dragger for sure and yesterday I had ample opportunity to do the straddle waddle on numerous failed tech sections on the climb. I can happily say that my sack is intact, not a scratch in fact. BUT, the tops of my thighs are bruised from both legs hitting the shifters on one of the moderate speed technical sections failures! Thankfully my stem did not whack the sack, but in the 25 years I have been a mountain bike rider I have NEVER hit my crotch to the point of injury on any bike ever, even the old school steel bikes with short seat posts and high top tubes. I have hit my crotch on the stem, but that is not the TT, that is a fixed part and I would have hit the stem even if I was riding a girls bike. I have needed stitches from hitting my knee on the controls as I go over the bars, but never injury from nuts to top tube.

    Maybe I should change my marketing from tough long lasting bikes to preying on fear and weakness? Fear of whacking crotches on top tubes and the weak that worry about less than 1/2% of vehicle weight in their next frame purchace.

    Anyone else have top tube stories to tell?

    DT
    I'm 5'7" and ride a Motolite which has a very low standover. I can only think of one time where the low standover saved me from a painful encounter (stalled in a creek crossing and put my foot out in a dip in the creekbed). I'd agree that it's never a problem in 99% of situations.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  14. #14
    Nicole? Papa?
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes
    The pursuit of excessive standover is no different than the pursuit of the lightest trail or AM bikes, marketing BS.

    I am barely 5'8'' tall, when I buy pants I get the 30" length and ride a 2003 medium Spot with a Pike and 2008 rear triangle with 2.35 tires. No belly dragger for sure and yesterday I had ample opportunity to do the straddle waddle on numerous failed tech sections on the climb. I can happily say that my sack is intact, not a scratch in fact. BUT, the tops of my thighs are bruised from both legs hitting the shifters on one of the moderate speed technical sections failures! Thankfully my stem did not whack the sack, but in the 25 years I have been a mountain bike rider I have NEVER hit my crotch to the point of injury on any bike ever, even the old school steel bikes with short seat posts and high top tubes. I have hit my crotch on the stem, but that is not the TT, that is a fixed part and I would have hit the stem even if I was riding a girls bike. I have needed stitches from hitting my knee on the controls as I go over the bars, but never injury from nuts to top tube.

    Maybe I should change my marketing from tough long lasting bikes to preying on fear and weakness? Fear of whacking crotches on top tubes and the weak that worry about less than 1/2% of vehicle weight in their next frame purchace.

    Anyone else have top tube stories to tell?

    DT
    David, perhaps like a kid when he meets Santa at the local department store, I'm still excited that I get to talk to the man who makes my bike - literally. It's a unique thing!

    You asked the question about top tube stories, so I'm going to tell you mine.

    Yesterday, I was at a local trail centre.

    [Slight tangent for a sec. By a LOT of peoples reckoning, Scotland (my home) is blessed with an abundance of great trails. Many visitors from the States, Canada, France and New Zealand will tell us that we have some of the best, most technical trails they've ridden.]

    So this trail, Kirroughtree, has a ton of rocky drop offs, chutes and rock gardens as well as plenty of steep rocky climbs (this is typical of the type of trails we have in Scotland) - and if you have my skill level, you have to clip out fairly often. Yesterday I hit my 'crown jewels' off the top tube 3 times - nothing major, but pretty sore nonetheless.

    It is for reasons like the one I've just stated that TT standover height is pretty important to me. Although it may say more about me as a rider than how important SO height is.

    I'd like to caveat all this by saying that I've recently purchased my first Turner (2007 5 Spot, Large) which I've lusted after for such a long time. I hope to have it built up soon and I'm sure it's going to live up to all my expectations.

    BTW, you made a point about "changing your marketing from tough long lasting bikes to preying on fear and weakness". Tough, long lasting bikes is one of the reasons I bought your frame, sure. But there were others. The cache of the Turner brand, the fact that every Turner owner I know raves about the customer focused nature of the company. But above all of this, it's because everything I heard and read about the 5 Spot said it was the closest thing you could buy to the one true do it all bike, and that as a ride, it was a frame that had few (if any) equal. Just thought you might like to know my decision making process.

    Oh, and by the way2, I know quite a few folk have said that they approve of the TT cable runs, that it keeps them out of the way of all the dirt, and that for some people, it helps as they still like to shoulder the bike once in a while. I for one believe that running full outers (which I will do as I've drilled out the stops) will negate the dirt issue, and that I'd only ever really want to shoulder a race/xc bike not an aggresive 5.5" trail bike.

    Just my 2 cents worth (to coin an American phrase). But I'm only a novice in the world of Turners, but glad I made the leap!

    Sincerely, A.

  15. #15
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes
    .

    Anyone else have top tube stories to tell?

    DT
    Yup. My 2nd mtb was a 89 Stumpjumper with a horizontal tt. I was riding home from work one day which started with a short hill. I stood up on the cranks and was putting everything I had into it when the chain snapped. Crunch! My testicles were instantly slammed on to the top tube (Tange Prestige) and I collapsed on the pavement as waves of nauseating pain swept over me for a few minutes. I was okay enough to fix the chain and ride home cautiously.

    I impacted the same tt trying to ride over a boulder but it wasn't nearly as bad.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  16. #16
    gravity curmudgeon
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Stand over heights do not truly shrink in proportion to rider height as you go down in size imo. Smaller riders have it harder than larger riders. Barny (shortish inseam for her 5' 6") is less likely to attack a really hard climb if she is worried about not making it and racking her nads (metaphorically speaking) on the tt of her Pack when the time comes to clip out. I have no issues on mine. Putting the cable clutter on the underside of the tube would help a little.
    Julie, at 5'5" in shoes, considers standover height fundamental in her bike purchases. There is currently not a Turner Julie would buy due to standover. It is what it is.

    At 6' and 33-34 inseam I have not had any issues with standover on either of the two Turners I have owned. And, trust me, I have tried nearly every bike and body positioning possible.

    But I would also never be so arrogant as to assume that my experiences are relevant to anyone but myself. Everyone is different. Even just the worry of standover issues, whether real or not, could impact a person's cycling experience. I have seen two instances where one of Julie's chic buddy riders, shorter than Julie in one case and about Julie's height in another, ended up in screaming, tear spraying agony over an unfortunate top tube encounter with the crotch area.

    I've said this many times. The wee people get screwed with gear options in far too many cases.

  17. #17
    trail fairy
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    The stand over hight on this little sucka never helped when I was 5yrs old, I crashed slipped in between the seat and bars nutted myself tore a sack not nice for a 5yo, back in the day we lived in country, mtn high, so hospitals and ambulances didn't turn up in 1/2 hr like today! 4hr drive to the coast to the big town. I was admitted to childrens ward for a week for reconstrcutive surgery or in those days some nurses stroking my nutz and sewing me up with a needle!

    Yup one of my enduring and best memories, oh I created hell in the childrens ward too

    ps nice stories guys, I like where this thread is going

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes
    The pursuit of excessive standover is no different than the pursuit of the lightest trail or AM bikes, marketing BS.

    I am barely 5'8'' tall, when I buy pants I get the 30" length and ride a 2003 medium Spot with a Pike and 2008 rear triangle with 2.35 tires. No belly dragger for sure and yesterday I had ample opportunity to do the straddle waddle on numerous failed tech sections on the climb. I can happily say that my sack is intact, not a scratch in fact. BUT, the tops of my thighs are bruised from both legs hitting the shifters on one of the moderate speed technical sections failures! Thankfully my stem did not whack the sack, but in the 25 years I have been a mountain bike rider I have NEVER hit my crotch to the point of injury on any bike ever, even the old school steel bikes with short seat posts and high top tubes. I have hit my crotch on the stem, but that is not the TT, that is a fixed part and I would have hit the stem even if I was riding a girls bike. I have needed stitches from hitting my knee on the controls as I go over the bars, but never injury from nuts to top tube.

    Maybe I should change my marketing from tough long lasting bikes to preying on fear and weakness? Fear of whacking crotches on top tubes and the weak that worry about less than 1/2% of vehicle weight in their next frame purchace.

    Anyone else have top tube stories to tell?

    DT
    You are so right Mr. Turner. If all other aspects were equal, including paint thickness, then it would be time to be concerned with stand-over. But until then, I only stand over my bike while standing on the pedals. Otherwise, back up to the other 5,000 differentiators that everyone should consider when buying a new mountain bike.
    Craig, Durango CO
    "Lighten up PAL" ... King Cage

  19. #19
    TLL
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    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes

    Maybe I should change my marketing from tough long lasting bikes to preying on fear and weakness? Fear of whacking crotches on top tubes and the weak that worry about less than 1/2% of vehicle weight in their next frame purchace.
    I agree, you need to change your marketing focus. FUD rules the day. I'd personally change your slogan to:

    TurnerBikes--your 'nads have nothing to fear.
    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  20. #20
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    No, I'm NOT back!

  21. #21
    trail fairy
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    Classic CC
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  22. #22
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    With sloping TTs, I'm not sure I would trust the #s between different brands. I've always suspected it was more who was measuring that deterimend the results.

    For that big S there, seems that given the same or close bottom bracket height, lenght and angle of the Taco (Turner) and angled down TT (big S), same fork, and same ST size they would be pretty close to each other.

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