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  1. #1
    gravity curmudgeon
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    Do I want a 6pack/RFX?

    Well, of course I do, but is that a good choice for me? I'm starting to see light at the end of another skiing obsessed winter, and cycling is back on my brain. I just built up a new blur xc for mrs. cowdog, and we're starting to plan our annual cycling kick-off with an April road ride in YNP (roads plowed, but still closed to cars). Those two things have me itching to fiddle with more bike toys.

    Love the flux. Thinking about either adding a bike to the quiver and keeping the flux (lots of fun, way more cash than I have available, however). The other option is to replace the flux. The impetus here is for a bike with more travel that doesn't leave my lungs splattered over the mountains during requisite long big vert climbs. SW Montana riding -- think big mountains, skinny trails and fire/logging roads, plenty of technical, rocks O plenty, long and fast descents.

    Contenders: 6pack/RFX or Nomad (Trust Turner, love my current Turner but can probably save some cash on a Nomad - just turns out that way). 5spot is probably too in the middle for me. These bigger travel bikes are a new world to me, and I want to experiment this summer.

  2. #2
    HIKE!
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    Rfx

    Solid performer, SixPack/RFX has been around a while and evolved. Real big trail bike features like ISCG mounts for a chainguide mount, proven buschings at the pivots, and a nice functional normal tubing profile. Even a bottle cage fits to haul a light battery, or actual water! Better tire clearance as well. BB shell and headtube come faced and chased, and disc tabs are flat and square.

    Nomads are fine, but overly complicated, bearings to rot and get wiggly, lots of shaped tubing just for the sake of lots of shaped tubing, sorta new to the big trail bike world is VPP technology. Paint all over the disc tabs, bb faces and headtube from the factory, gotta have you shop deal with that.

    You'll like either one, though.

  3. #3
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I think you may not be appreciating how much difference there is between the Flux and the Spot. You must be able to find a demo near you, no? Go ride one with the 5.3" rockers and a real fork like a Pike and you may have more bike than you expected.

    As far as the 6P/RFX goes, the cool thing about the 6-Pack is that with Spot rockers and such you can basically have both bikes (a Spot and a Pack). Run an air shock and you will be covered for any contingency for a long while (no extra springs to buy; just adjust air pressure for current needs).

    If you are considering a Nomad, I would encourage you to look at the 6.6 also. I rode both with the same fork and similar kit and would go for the 6.6 long before the Nomad, personally.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  4. #4
    gravity curmudgeon
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    I think you may not be appreciating how much difference there is between the Flux and the Spot. You must be able to find a demo near you, no? Go ride one with the 5.3" rockers and a real fork like a Pike and you may have more bike than you expected.
    I spent a lot of effort and traveled many miles last summer to demo a couple of spots (very short around the block rides), only to end up buying a flux when the opportunity presented itself. Maybe you are right in that the spot could be a good fit and more of a change from the flux than I expect. I'm going to have to see if I can get on a spot and RFX here in the next few weeks during some work travel SLC way.

    I would love to check out the 6.6. Nomad is in the running primarilly because SC geometries have fit me very well (blur, heckler). Spyder, my one Intense riding experience, in contrast, was not a geometry for me at all.

  5. #5
    PSI
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    I want that one
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    easy peazy

    if youre keeping the flux get a rfx, if youre replacing the flux get a 5 spot.

  6. #6
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    heres how i see it. after gettin my much loved flux, i asked dt about another bike. i really wanted a spot but he told me the jump from one to the other was small and hooked me up with a like new '02 rfc (rfxc) with 5" and 6" rockers and 2 shocks, a air and a coil. its a blast and i was suprised how agile it is despite its 32 lbs. id say its a much bigger jump in 5" mode than i was told to expect so i have no plans on loosin my flux anytime soon. ive yet to ride it in 6" mode, damn winter! i think you could accomplish the same thing with a pack and retain a good bit of rideability but id hate to see ya sell the flux. the comparisons between the 2 are minimal and i believe yould be bummin if ya lost the rocket.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  7. #7
    Roy
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Go ride a Spot with the 5.3" rockers and a real fork like a Pike and you may have more bike than you expected.
    Ts - have you swapped out your original 5.1 rockers with Barney's (or whomever's) 5.3 rockers for your Spot? And if so, did you notice much of a difference?

  8. #8
    No, that's not phonetic
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    No, I have not stolen them off her bike. I still ride 5.1's.

    On the bike fit thing, I agree that a demo is in order. I have ridden VPFrees, a Heckler, and the Nomad. Loved the VP and Heckler, didn't take to the Nomad. Rode a Spider, 5.5, and 6.6. The Spider is a bit too quick but I forgave that since it's a race bike. No excuse for how twitchy teh 5.5 is though. The 6.6 is pretty dialed with the right fork (Van 36 etc).
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  9. #9
    Roy
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    No, I have not stolen them off her bike. I still ride 5.1's.
    Well stop swapping air cans and start swapping rockers. I'm trying to determine if there's a difference worth the $90.

  10. #10
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    If you end up selling the Flux and buying a new bike, I think the 5 Spot would be more versatile than a RFX because of its climbing ability. A Pike U-turn allows you to dial it down for the long climbs you have in your area and the 140mm of travel up front will be a huge difference from the 100mm that you currently have. It is pretty easy to build a 5 Spot that weighs 29-32 pounds, climbs well, AND goes downhill really well.

    If you do decide to keep the Flux AND buy a second bike then an RFX might make more sense.

  11. #11
    Pixie Dust Addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowDawg
    Love the flux. Thinking about either adding a bike to the quiver and keeping the flux (lots of fun, way more cash than I have available, however). The other option is to replace the flux. The impetus here is for a bike with more travel that doesn't leave my lungs splattered over the mountains during requisite long big vert climbs. SW Montana riding -- think big mountains, skinny trails and fire/logging roads, plenty of technical, rocks O plenty, long and fast descents.

    Contenders: 6pack/RFX or Nomad (Trust Turner, love my current Turner but can probably save some cash on a Nomad - just turns out that way). 5spot is probably too in the middle for me. These bigger travel bikes are a new world to me, and I want to experiment this summer.
    When I get off my Spot and ride the Flux, I have to spend the first few minutes reminding myself that I'm on the 4" bike. Otherwise I start trying to roll through/jump off things on the Flux that will cause me to wad myself and my bike up into a little ball if I don't get it perfect. The 5 Spot allows you to go bigger/faster downhill with less effort than the Flux, while only climbing with a little more effort.

    To echo others' comments, if you're going to replace the Flux get a Spot for its versatility. If you're going to keep the Flux, then the RFX is the way to go.

  12. #12
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    6 Pack...your questioning?

    Take a gander at todays post by El Chingon, "6 Packfest 06". IMO the 6 Pack is the perfect bike. I had a XCE before my Pack and it (Pack) didn't slow me down a bit.

  13. #13
    gravity curmudgeon
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    thanks for the feedback. This is interesting because I don't necessarilly need more travel or burl, but I want to experiment. With skis, I am on fat, burly skis (my day to day skis are 97mm at the waist); I ski different lines and don't don't make too many short radius turns, but I don't find myself limited in any way in even extremely technical terrain. I've been thinking about the parallels between fatter skis and bigger travel bikes. Given my skiing experience, I figure it is time to play that game with bikes.

    I really need to get on some more bikes.

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