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  1. #1
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    Do I need a Spot?

    theres already a 2008 flux sitting the the shed, which is the best bike ever owned...


    The flux is my XC machine, 32 F100 RLC, Deus, 717 flat bars.

    should I have a Spot as a stable mate built up a little stronger?

    are they too close?

    currently weigh 95kg ride XC all day epics, no air

  2. #2
    trail fairy
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    Get an RFX all the boys been building em up like XC bikes anyways
    FLux Spot too close even though quite different rides, you'll grow into the RFX and never need another rig!

    Don't get a HL I want one left for me preferably
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  3. #3
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    Rollex,

    My experience might shed light on yours, in part. I started on a Burner, then moved to a Flux. While I loved them, there was always that urge to go more. I constantly held myself within the boundaries of both bikes, simply because my actual riding was only slightly outside the boundaries, at the time.

    Fast forward some time, I was planning on adding an RFX to the stable, and DT presented the opportunity, so I snatched it up. While I'm going several steps beyond your situation, I wanted to include that my RFX is built decently light, at around 34 pounds and the gf's at 32.

    Owning the RFX's, we are left wanting nothing else in terms of riding. They afford a wider range of riding and never are we left leaving a trailside feature unridden because the bike isn't meant for it. They can be pedaled quite easily up and through rocks.

    For an XC leaning rider, one can bet the Spot is a clear choice without going too far. The only question I must ask is if you're not doing air, but all day epics, which the Spot is great for, what do you actually want it for? Is there more to the terrain that what the Flux is designed for? More within you that you want to try? The discount?

  4. #4
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    JC I think a little bit of the answer lies in your post.
    There is the odd trail that I would not ride on the Flux for 2 reasons; the bike is not meant for it and; it probably scares the chite out of me... if I had a bike that was capable then perhaps I could step up my riding.

    what low weight can a RFX (large) be built up to?

    Was thinking of building the Spot or RFX up including
    Hope 819
    Hope MonoM4
    Deus cranks
    Float 140mm
    X9 drivetrain

    comments? likely weight?

    the discount has definitely helped!

  5. #5
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    I would think the current RFX with that (save the fork) could be built to about 31 pounds, perhaps even lighter. You have a fine selection, as I use the brakes, X9, and the gf uses 819's. I am weary of that fork on an RFX, though it would be great on a Spot. The weight would be slightly lower on a Spot, though the RFX would be better served with a 36 Van RC2.

    I know what you mean about scary stuff, as I needed a slacker head angle pretty desperately when I was on the Flux. Even the RFX's headangle with a Z1 or 36 wasn't enough, so I put a 7mm Ventana race, which could also be an option for a Spot with a 140 Float.

  6. #6
    Surfin' da mountain
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    I'd suggest an RFX with a Fox 36 Talas RC2, Hope Motos, and some fairly wide rims (I use Syncro 28's on my SPOT) everything else can be lightweight. The Talas will let you reduce your travel down to 130mm when you're riding twisty stuff, then bump up to 160mm when it gets steep and fast.
    Last edited by Cucucachu; 07-14-2008 at 09:43 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cucucachu
    I'd suggest an RFX with a Fox 36 Talas RC2, Hope Motos, and some fairly wide rims (I use Syncro 28's on my SPOT) everything else can be lightweight. The Talas will let you reduce your travel down to 130mm when you're on the RFX and riding twisty stuff, then bump up to 160mm when it gets steep and fast.
    That's actually similar to my 06 RFX (heavier than the 07 and later). I run a v2 vented up front (and now I'm finally needing that extra fade resistance!) and an M4/183 rear with a 36 TALAS RC2 up front. The gf is running an M4 front and Mini 180 rear and a Z1 RC2. We're coming in at ~34 and ~32, respectively. I run DT 5.1 rims on Hope Pro II's, while she has an 819 rear on a DT 240s and 5.1 front on a ProII. I run a coil rear, hers is a RP23. This should give you a baseline on where you can go with either.

  8. #8
    TLL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    For an XC leaning rider, one can bet the Spot is a clear choice without going too far. The only question I must ask is if you're not doing air, but all day epics, which the Spot is great for, what do you actually want it for? Is there more to the terrain that what the Flux is designed for? More within you that you want to try? The discount?
    Answer this, and you have your answer.

    For all day rides with some fun tecchy stuff thrown in, the Spot is the clear choice. You can certainly take the RFX on extended rides, and it is the best choice for more uber tecchy terrain, but it is still a lot of bike for all day rides, unless you toss in a good helping of tecchy fun stuff. But for tech riding, it is hard to beat, and for up and down tech riding, I would chose it over the Spot. Are you looking for a bike that can ride more challenging terrain? Do you want to do some drops/steeps/jumps? Or will the bike be ridden primarily on what you ride now?

    I have my RFX built to 32.5 lbs, and that is with an XL frame. I would not want to go any lighter, but that's just me.

    I run a TALAS on mine, which really comes in handy. If you can climb with a 160mm fork then go Vanilla.
    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  9. #9
    Silence and Thunder...
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    Side note: don't discount the effect of tire selection! Even mounting up some burly 2.35+ tires on a Flux will make it 'feel' like a lot more bike...
    ...every day sends future to past...

  10. #10
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    peas in a pod

    Don't be to obsessed with building a light RFX. Mine was pretty light, then I went with heavier single ply tires, but they were too tall with a 13.625 radius!!!! So the only thing laying around worthy of the RFX were some very used, 2.5 Maxxis 2 ply DH tires. I put them on for a day of chair riding with Superstock yesterday. WOW, heavy tires are a blast. 23 psi in front and about 28 in the rear. Never pinged a rim, and looked many a rock straight in the eye, what a blast. On the last run of the day we pedaled across the mountain top long enough to get into a XC kinda groove with the seat up and once up to speed they rolled over ruts and rocks like a 29r. I also put a 7.75" shock that PUSH cut down for me, thing was a downhill shredder and if I had a U-Turn equipped fork I could have tuned the geo on the fly for rolly terrain.

    DT

  11. #11
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    now I'm confused, I one miniute I'm thinking RFX then next Spot...
    I'd imagine I would build with the same kit. Whats happening with the 09 bikes, is anything changing? If I get a RFX now will it be the Spot next year?

    should I just hang all xc race bits on the flux (which I own) and get a RFx or spot or rfx or spot... arrrghhhhh

    will groms laugh at me when I bypass drop offs on the RFX?

  12. #12
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    Why change?

    Here's for flying in the face of "bigger is better" - I think you should keep the flux.

    I do similar riding on a flux, with some occasional xc or team 12/24 hour races thrown in (but by far the majority of my riding is non competitive). I've toyed with getting a longer travel bike, but have stayed with the flux for a few reasons:

    - it can handle technical xc just fine. Sure a longer travel machine goes faster down the rougher stuff and the flux can't keep up with a similar ability rider on a RFX, but that's half the challenge to me, you have to pick your lines and work to keep up with riders on bigger bikes and most of the time you can. Sure, if you're into air, then get a bike made to take it, but damn the flux is a capable machine over a lot of stuff. As long as you're not hanging stupidly light WW parts off it, you can build something that will take a decent beating.

    - faster downhill is not necessarily more fun. I can scare the living sh#t out of myself taking the flux to its limits downhill. Every now & then I stuff up, the current $4,000 dental bill and concussion from my last crash testament to that. So...if I had a spot or something bigger, I would have to go that much faster to get the same kick out of it. When I did crash, inevitable given my (lack of) talent, the mess would just be bigger.

    - More travel can take the fun out of some trails. Whenever I've ridden a longer travel bike over some of my favorite less technical trails, I can take any line I want. That gives it as much challenge as riding on the road.

    - heavier bikes are just plain slower over epic distances. Why lug around more weight if you don't need to? Save it so you can pile extra crap in your camelbak.

    Unless your riding style is about to change, you lose the speed and agility of the flux and gain what?

  13. #13
    trail fairy
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    Quote Originally Posted by fresh tracks
    Here's for flying in the face of "bigger is better" - I think you should keep the flux.

    I do similar riding on a flux, with some occasional xc or team 12/24 hour races thrown in (but by far the majority of my riding is non competitive). I've toyed with getting a longer travel bike, but have stayed with the flux for a few reasons:

    - it can handle technical xc just fine. Sure a longer travel machine goes faster down the rougher stuff and the flux can't keep up with a similar ability rider on a RFX, but that's half the challenge to me, you have to pick your lines and work to keep up with riders on bigger bikes and most of the time you can. Sure, if you're into air, then get a bike made to take it, but damn the flux is a capable machine over a lot of stuff. As long as you're not hanging stupidly light WW parts off it, you can build something that will take a decent beating.

    - faster downhill is not necessarily more fun. I can scare the living sh#t out of myself taking the flux to its limits downhill. Every now & then I stuff up, the current $4,000 dental bill and concussion from my last crash testament to that. So...if I had a spot or something bigger, I would have to go that much faster to get the same kick out of it. When I did crash, inevitable given my (lack of) talent, the mess would just be bigger.

    - More travel can take the fun out of some trails. Whenever I've ridden a longer travel bike over some of my favorite less technical trails, I can take any line I want. That gives it as much challenge as riding on the road.

    - heavier bikes are just plain slower over epic distances. Why lug around more weight if you don't need to? Save it so you can pile extra crap in your camelbak.

    Unless your riding style is about to change, you lose the speed and agility of the flux and gain what?
    Ahh ya killing the homie's need to add to the stable, I thought or took it that he was keeping the Flux just wanted to add to it for options, sure he can choose which to take where!

    if ya got more than one bike sometimes taking the boig bike out is not about replacing the long trail ride, its just about a ride, chilling with ya mates building some features, ripping some corners all day, or whipping a 2ft gapper and 3 foot for others me Im get to about 3.5feet, point is sometimes it what type of ride do I want to day, ok Im ok to go push up some hills so I can enjoy some blurry eye action back down again, other days its about a long trail ride out in the boonies!

    So I think hes keeping the Flux well thats how I read it, and I would too its one hell of a bike, just not sure my back can handle the steep geo anymore, but it rips no arument from me! but if I was adding another then the RFX 08 is the one to have beside her if ya want more travel, not saying Spot is bad its all so hard ahh, hence why I say just get a bifgger garage, sell the SUV ya aint gonna have fuel soon anyway fill the garage with blowout Turners!
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

    MAXXIS 4C!
    Helmet for your neck

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  14. #14
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    Oops, thanks TA, missed the "stable mate" bit.

    Get an RFX then

  15. #15
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    Spot

    I ride some very long singletrack rides on my 5 spot. I like cross country riding, but I like ripping downhill even more. I hike my 5 spot up lots of stuff that I know most people don't ride. If they are hiking their bikes up it, they are downhill rigs and they have hiked a very, very long ways. I'm taking my 5 spot to Germany in August to ride the Alta Rezia freeride trip through the alps. The dudes there said a 5 spot would be the perfect bike for that trip. Tons of tech downhill and big bomber downhill as well as some considerable climbing (which that bike makes fun). My next bike is a DHR. If/when our gigantic mountainous state makes a bike park.

    Side question. Is running 2.7 tires on the 5 spot with a vanilla (5 inch fork) okay, or not okay.

  16. #16
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    yesh pretty sure I want to keep the Flux for race use, its kitted with flat bars, have a race oriented set up, Fox F100, have really enjoyed it (and still will) but just think theres room in the shed for another. The RFX is tempting but leaning to the Spot. Thanks for all your comments, they bring new perspectives.
    I think a Spot with a more relaxed set up, ie riser bars, a little less stretched out, and maybe a 32 Talas or 32 Van or 32 Float if I don't need to drop the front will be a good mate to the Flux.

    One reasons I return to buy a 3rd Turner is the fact I get opinions from Mr T himself on the forum (also thanks to Greg and Jarret for previous correspondance).

    I'm also swayed to the Spot, looking ahead as the family is arriving, if I have to drop to just one bike (out of 5) maybe the Spot is the best option, can still race it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfbkr50
    I ride some very long singletrack rides on my 5 spot. I like cross country riding, but I like ripping downhill even more. I hike my 5 spot up lots of stuff that I know most people don't ride. If they are hiking their bikes up it, they are downhill rigs and they have hiked a very, very long ways. I'm taking my 5 spot to Germany in August to ride the Alta Rezia freeride trip through the alps. The dudes there said a 5 spot would be the perfect bike for that trip. Tons of tech downhill and big bomber downhill as well as some considerable climbing (which that bike makes fun). My next bike is a DHR. If/when our gigantic mountainous state makes a bike park.

    Side question. Is running 2.7 tires on the 5 spot with a vanilla (5 inch fork) okay, or not okay.
    Sounds like a great ride. Keep tabs of the routes and trailheads and the like because I'm relatively local and I'd want to check it out.

    As far as the fork goes, which Van? Is it 125 or 140mm? Next, the fork would be the limiting factor for the tires. I am not sure what kind of clearance those Fox 32's offer (Vanilla can be had in most of their fork lines and only refers to a coil spring and not what the fork is), which I'm assuming is the series you're talking about.

  18. #18
    PSI
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    Quote Originally Posted by therollex
    JC I think a little bit of the answer lies in your post.
    There is the odd trail that I would not ride on the Flux for 2 reasons; the bike is not meant for it and; it probably scares the chite out of me... if I had a bike that was capable then perhaps I could step up my riding.

    what low weight can a RFX (large) be built up to?

    Was thinking of building the Spot or RFX up including
    Hope 819
    Hope MonoM4
    Deus cranks
    Float 140mm
    X9 drivetrain

    comments? likely weight?

    the discount has definitely helped!
    if you're going to build a bike with 819's then it should be a spot. i'm mystified by people building up xc rfx's with kits that should go on 5 spots. i mean, you have a frame that will go big and you limit it with a build that wont. so why not get a spot?. i got a flux which is my xc-trail bike after owning a spot for a couple years. my spot is built up for heavy trail duty - 160 fork and 823. i ride both bikes a lot and they are worlds apart.

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