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  1. #1
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    Cross post: Why not a Nomad?

    Hi,

    I posted this on the Santa Cruz forum and got some gret repsonses but figured you Turner folks might have some opinions as well. If I buy Spot I'm looking at a Pike 454 fork, on a Nomad Talas RC2:


    So, like many in this forum I'm looking at the Nomad for my next bike. I currently ride a Stumpy 120. I've never felt really balanced on it and now want something slacker.

    I've looked at the standard options and have pretty much narrowed it down to a few bikes:

    Nomad
    5 Spot
    Heckler
    BLT

    The Spot and the Nomad are out in front

    Now before I get a ton of replies saying the nomad isn't in the same category as a 5 Spot, let's take a look at the geometry numbers and my riding.

    I live in the Bay Area so climbing is a fact of life, lots of it. I'm trying to get away from a pure cross country ride, open up the HA to 68 or 69, and use the bike for "agressive trail riding", lots of flow. No hucks, if I do drop it will be less than 2-3 feet, as part of a trail.

    If we look at some of the key bike geometry numbers in XL (I'm a bit over 6'4"):

    HA WB SA
    Nomad 69 45 71
    5 Spot 69 45.6 73.5
    Heckler 69 44.9 71.5
    BLT 69.5 44.7 72.5

    I found some of these interesting...for example, you often hear that the nomad is long but according to these numbers the 5 Spot is actually longer! Actually the more I think about it the Nomad looks like a VPP Heckler. Hence my question.

    Normally I'd say "I don't need a Nomad, too much bike". I rode a Nomad and a Spot, loved both of them and was leaning towards the spot but more and more I keep asking "Why not get a Nomad?"

    For instance, weight wise, the Nomad and a Heckler are close. Everyone loves a heckler for agressive trail riding.

    A beefy 5 Spot will get up there in weight as well. The spot is longer too.

    Will a nomad let me grow further as I progress?

    I suspect I can't go wrong with either ride but I'm certinaly open to comments and suggestions.

  2. #2
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    I don't have either of these bikes (so feel free to disregard everything I say ) but I have crunched the numbers a bunch so I'll give you my input anyway.

    As you stated, the XL Nomad has a HA of 69*, that's with a 522mm A-C length fork. That means a Pike, a ~130mm Marzocchi, or a 36 Talas with the travel reduced accordingly. That also mean you have 6.5+" in the back and ~ 5 or 5.5" up front. Will this affect how "balanced" the bike feels or the handling? I don't know.

    If you put the typical 150-170mm fork on the Nomad it's going to slack it out a bit. Which some people love and some don't. Maybe the 36 Talas will give you the versatility you need.

    Quote Originally Posted by paulq
    I found some of these interesting...for example, you often hear that the nomad is long but according to these numbers the 5 Spot is actually longer!
    It's possible that the "Nomad is long" comments stem from the Nomad's long chainstays (17.5", compared to the spots 16.9"). That's just a guess, though. I'm sure the additional 0.6" affects the bikes handling.


    Quote Originally Posted by paulq
    A beefy 5 Spot will get up there in weight as well.
    According to the specs on their respective websites the Spot frame is almost a pound lighter (and that's assuming a DHX air on the Spot and a Float on the Nomand). With the same build maybe the pound is irrelevant, but generally Nomads are built up a little beefier than Spots. Just my observation.

    Quote Originally Posted by paulq
    I suspect I can't go wrong with either ride but I'm certinaly open to comments and suggestions.
    If you've ridden both and liked them I guess you can't go wrong. I hope I helped (maybe a little?).

    Patrick
    Last edited by PCinSC; 05-29-2006 at 07:25 PM.

  3. #3
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    You have made some valid statements. Just a couple of other things to think about. The Nomad is a bigger bike as you stated. In some cases, bigger is not better.

    Since you are in the Bay area, is it safe to say you see lots of rain? The one thing I absolutely love about my 6 pack is the bushings/grease ports. All though I live in a very dry climate, a few shots of gease every few months and I have the quietest and smoothest bike I have ever owned. The Nomad will develop squeeky bearings (this is noted very well on the SC/Intense boards) due to the design. It is not a bad design, there is just a ton of stress on the bearings.

    I love the way my 6 pack climbs and descends, and it is built burly at about 35lbs.. I cannot imagine how well a Spot would climb.
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  4. #4
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    Good points made above. Don't forget customer service. Both companies provide the goods, but Turner will take care of problems so fast, you'll almost feel guilty -- and will likely miss one weekend of riding at the most.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  5. #5
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    Spot.

    If you just plan on trail riding and not hucking over 2ft, the Nomad is overkill. Sure, if you plan on going bigger, the Nomad will allow you to do so, but how much over 2-3ft will you go? Probably not over 4ft, which is nothing to scoff at, as it is a bigger drop/hit than most riders will ever take. 5" is plenty of travel. More than enough for most applications. The Spot and Lt are enough bike for what you are looking for. The Heckler would be a great choice as well and is much cheaper than the other choices.

    I would choose the Spot and Heckler over the Lt. I am still not a big fan of vpp bikes, even though they pretty much do every thing as advertised. I have a Pack and have owned a Heckler and the Spot has better pedaling and braking characteristics over technical terrain. The Heckler is no slouch though and it can handle more punishment than a 5-spot and most of the other bikes in its class. It is a great bike.

    In your case, I think the 5-spot is the best choice.

  6. #6
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    For me, it's the BB. 13.7 is too low for a 6.5" travel bike. I smack my pedals enough as it is (as the sheared mallet axle from last weekend shows), and I had a 13.7" BB with the 5.75" foes. With .75 more travel than that particular bike, the BB is just way too low for aggressive riding in nasty terrain IMO.

    Other than that, I guess it may be ok. I like the versatility of my pack, and the ability of it to take serious abuse. Clearly marketed as "freeride", whereas the nomad is a lot of bike for "all mountain" without the green light for "freeride".
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
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    Cross post: Why not a Nomad?

    Hi Ronny,

    Thanks for the reply! I agree I don't need a nomad but from my research thus far I can't figure out why not to get a Nomad. If you look at the nomad geometry numbers and weight it isn't as far off the Spot as you'd expect. I'm not saying they are the same but the nomad can clearly be a killer trail bike.

    So, my problem keeps coming back to why not?

    I have no doubt the spot would be sweet, and if you don't like VPP that makes it easy. I've demo'd a nomad and found VPP pretty impressive.

    Thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    If you just plan on trail riding and not hucking over 2ft, the Nomad is overkill. Sure, if you plan on going bigger, the Nomad will allow you to do so, but how much over 2-3ft will you go? Probably not over 4ft, which is nothing to scoff at, as it is a bigger drop/hit than most riders will ever take. 5" is plenty of travel. More than enough for most applications. The Spot and Lt are enough bike for what you are looking for. The Heckler would be a great choice as well and is much cheaper than the other choices.

    I would choose the Spot and Heckler over the Lt. I am still not a big fan of vpp bikes, even though they pretty much do every thing as advertised. I have a Pack and have owned a Heckler and the Spot has better pedaling and braking characteristics over technical terrain. The Heckler is no slouch though and it can handle more punishment than a 5-spot and most of the other bikes in its class. It is a great bike.

    In your case, I think the 5-spot is the best choice.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC
    I don't have either of these bikes (so feel free to disregard everything I say ) but I have crunched the numbers a bunch so I'll give you my input anyway.
    Thanks for the feeback...everythign helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC
    As you stated, the XL Nomad has a HA of 69*, that's with a 522mm A-C length fork. That means a Pike, a ~130mm Marzocchi, or a 36 Talas with the travel reduced accordingly. That also mean you have 6.5+" in the back and ~ 5 or 5.5" up front. Will this affect how "balanced" the bike feels or the handling? I don't know.

    If you put the typical 150-170mm fork on the Nomad it's going to slack it out a bit. Which some people love and some don't. Maybe the 36 Talas will give you the versatility you need.
    I rode the Nomad with a 36 Talas on front...felt good. I wouldn't go bigger for trail use. Truth be told I don't need that much travel but it seemed to match the bike well.

    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC

    It's possible that the "Nomad is long" comments stem from the Nomad's long chainstays (17.5", compared to the spots 16.9"). That's just a guess, though. I'm sure the additional 0.6" affects the bikes handling.
    I'd be curious to hear from people who understand geometry detail better than I. How does chainstay length affect handling exactly?

    What about WB beign shorther vs. chainstay being longer?

    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC
    According to the specs on their respective websites the Spot frame is almost a pound lighter (and that's assuming a DHX air on the Spot and a Float on the Nomand). With the same build maybe the pound is irrelevant, but generally Nomads are built up a little beefier than Spots. Just my observation.

    If I use the SC site to build a nomad, I can get it to around 30.26 lbs - 32.75 lbs. I haven't tried an exact weight in on a spot but form the forums, with a 454, I figure around 30-ish.
    Quote Originally Posted by PCinSC
    If you've ridden both and liked them I guess you can't go wrong. I hope I helped (maybe a little?).
    I did help, thank for the input!

  9. #9
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    Another bit to chew on: 5-Pack.
    If you don't really want a 6" bike you could build up a RFX with a Spot rear triangle and 5" rockers and have a bike as burly as the Nomad, that can be converted to 6" down the road. The shorter chain stays will make it feel a bit more nimble, and the total frame weight will be very close to a stock Spot according to some of the ppl here who've done it... Tscheezy even went as far as using only a Spot seatstay, with a longer shock to get the RFX up to ~7" It dosen't sound like you'll need anything like that ... this is just some things to make your head spin I guess...but it's nice to know the longterm options are there.

    For simplicity sake though it sounds like the 5 Spot will fit your needs well ... I cannot compare it to the Nomad firsthand though.
    Last edited by Bikezilla; 05-29-2006 at 10:09 PM.
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  10. #10
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    I was not really trying to talk you out of a Nomad, it just seems like a 6.5" travel bike is a tad much for what I interpret from your post, as general trail riding. You can hit 2 footers to tranny on a 4" xc trail bike. Sure, you can use the Nomad for every type of riding and you very well might start riding it on more aggressive terrain over time.

    Like I stated before, Vpp works as advertised for the most part. One draw back is that the vpp is reliant on chain tension and the harder you pedal, the firmer the suspension becomes. This can become somewhat of a hinderance when you are pedaling hard over technical uphill terrain and the suspension becomes stiffer. This is not as evident on a HL or well executed Faux bar design. I do not really take a firm stance with the sp vs HL vs vpp debates, but there is differences between the designs and the vpp bikes have some of the negative traits of the traditional sp bikes.

    I wouldn't base my research on geometry and numbers only. It makes more sense to use a 5" fork with a Spot than a 6" fork that is common on a Nomad. This would give a HA close to 69dg. Most riders are using a 6" fork on the Nomad, which gives a HA of 68dg or less. Some riders are putting a 5.5" Pike on the Nomad and as Jayem suggests, the already low bb, becomes lower and pedal smacks can become a regular occurance, or not, as I don't have any serious time on the Nomad to say for sure, one way or the other.

    VPP pivots are notorious for being unreliable. It is pretty much a certainty that you will be wrenching/replacing pivots on your bike more if it is a vpp, than another design. The Turner Bushing system is the best in the business. Bushings in a Turner are low maintenance.

    I still feel that a 5-spot, BLT, and Heckler would be better platforms for the riding you prefer. If you are really set on a Nomad, then get it. I would recommend trying to get a ride on all the bikes of interest first.

  11. #11
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    nn/mm
    Last edited by DamoNNomaD; 05-29-2006 at 10:46 PM.

  12. #12
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    Of the 4 bikes you mentioned the Nomad's geometry is the least fit for climbing because of the long chain stay, and slack seat tube angle.

    The steeper the ST the better climber the bike is cos the saddle, and your peddling power are directly above the BB.

    The shorter the CS the closer the rear wheel is to your center, the better you climb.

    From the description of your riding style and the amount of climbing involved I would go with any of the other 3. If most of that climbing is fire roads go with VPP or Single pivot. If most of the climbing is technical go with 4 bar.

    Of the 4 bikes I have ridden the Heckler and 5 Spot and both are superb bikes with dailed geometry. I ended up with a Spot but almost got a Heckler. The BLT and Nomad were not out yet...

  13. #13
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    If you are looking to bring up the level of your game, and want a big bike then get one. The 5spot is a work of art, and you will probably be very happy with it as it is a solid do-all bike, but imho you should compare the RFX to the nomad.

    My point of view is to buy the biggest bike you can 'handle' on the climbs and let your skills grow into it. Who knows, maybe once you have a big bike you will start taking bigger drops, etc.

    The only thing that would keep me away from the nomad would be the bearing rumours. I've had a 6 pack for about a year, and it is smooth and whisper quiet...in my mind a lot has to do with being able to easily grease the bushings. Next time you go to the bike shop, have the guy show you the greaseports...it's such good design. The bushings were not something that I cared about at the purchase, but something that I have grown to appreciate more than other factors as my ownership has progressed.

  14. #14
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    Take this for what it's worth....

    A friend of mine recently rode a Nomad at a demo day and really enjoyed it. Then rode my Spot and fell in love. This guy currently rides a pure XC Sugar 1 so any type of a "All Mountain" bike was going to be a big switch for him.

    These were his thoughts: The Nomad really inspired him on the downhill sections and made him "a much better technical rider". The handling felt good and the only thing he didn't like was the climbing aspect. Said he could really feel the weight and that he felt slower (duh!) although he didn't have to pick lines which helped.

    When he rode my Spot the first thing out of his mouth was he couldn't believe how well it climbed (mine is fairly heavy also as it still has the Romic on it). He said he could feel the weight difference but felt as if the weight disappeared on the climbs. He also said the downhills were very smooth and couldn't tell much of a difference from the Nomad. So in his opinion the Spot climbed much better than the Nomad and decended as well as it. He also mentioned that the handling seemed a bit quicker with the Spot, but didn't really say if yeah or nay to that on either bike.

    Well...there's a second hand story for you. The one caveat that I would put in is the fact that the Turners Bushing system is tops. I've been riding my Spot for 2+ years now without any maintenace (other than using the grease gun every couple of months) and the bike is as quite & tight as the day I bought it. Enjoy!!

  15. #15
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    I've owned a much simpler SCB bike (Bullit, from '02.5, rode for 2 seasons, still in use by a friend)

    and I've ridden a few of the newer VPP bikes (Blur, Blur 4X, VP-Free)

    here are the reasons to buy a Nomad --

    1) you want what all the bike mags have hyped endlessly (translation: you are a lemming)

    2) you like the new frame design (translation: "I think it looks cool")

    3) you like the assortment of colors available from SCB

    4) you like the fact that you can get a SCB as a frame, partially built, or fully built at a bit of a discount from what it would cost for a Turner

    5) you have several SCB dealers near you and no Turner dealers near you, and having a dealer nearby is very important to you

    6) you've ridden other VPP bikes and like the feel

    here are reasons to ignore SCB and get a Turner

    1) you want to be able to ride your bike instead of spending time replacing pivot bearings and checking fastener torques

    2) you know that the bike mags hype the newest "hot bike" by their biggest advertisement buyers, rather than what truly is a new revelation in bicycle design/performance

    3) you don't need to be palliated with the comfort of a local dealer

    4) you are comfortable with yourself

    5) you don't need to have the mfr tell you what "build kits" are best for your bike

    6) you've ridden a Turner and know that the SCB bikes, although they deliver nice performance, are really in the farm leagues when it comes to cornering and stability.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronny
    I was not really trying to talk you out of a Nomad, it just seems like a 6.5" travel bike is a tad much for what I interpret from your post, as general trail riding. You can hit 2 footers to tranny on a 4" xc trail bike.
    you can hit 2 footers to NO TRANNY on a fully rigid CX bike.

  17. #17
    not so super...
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    Another sugar-coated response from gonzo
    Nothing to see here.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSINGA
    Another sugar-coated response from gonzo
    thanks for that rolling-eyes bit of nonsense. I suppose you think that mollycoddling someone with "unbiased" information helps the decision process?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonzostrike
    ...you like the fact that you can get a SCB as a frame, partially built, or fully built at a bit of a discount from what it would cost for a Turner
    The Nomad frame, as per Speedgoat, anodized with the DHX Air (how the Spot comes standard) is over $2200, which is actually more expensive than the Spot frame. Maybe some shops give a discount. The SC build kits are heavily discounted, but that's assuming one wants a SC build kit (I wouldn't). Just something for the OP to keep in mind.

    Patrick
    Last edited by PCinSC; 05-30-2006 at 09:15 AM.

  20. #20
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    Patrick, I think you'll find that Speedgoat's prices typically are higher than even MSRP.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonzostrike
    Patrick, I think you'll find that Speedgoat's prices typically are higher than even MSRP.

    Good to know, I didn't realize that (I've never purchased from them). Their Nomad is marked right at SC's MSRP. Speedgoat claims they'll price match, so I'm sure one could get it cheaper. Thanks for the heads up.

    Patrick

  22. #22
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    is it just me or does the nomad look like a dog having a ****??????

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOZWAFC
    is it just me or does the nomad look like a dog having a ****??????
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Nothing to see here.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonzostrike
    thanks for that rolling-eyes bit of nonsense. I suppose you think that mollycoddling someone with "unbiased" information helps the decision process?
    Gonz - The same things could have been said with a little mollycoddling and would have made them easier to swallow. Not a requirement (of course). This post came across as if you had just completed a frenetic religious/social/political battle with people you consider complete idiots. (Not that I am trying to read your mind or anything ).

  25. #25
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    The XL Spot will fit you better than the XL Nomad.

    The rest is pure bias.

  26. #26
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Santa Cruz told me I could expect to have to replace the bearings every 7 months.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  27. #27
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    They should also throw in an Ipod to mask the noise they make before the bearings finally die.

  28. #28
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    Why not chat with some of the Nomad owners and see what they think? Most really love their bike so they can give you more scoop. I don't think 1 is necessarily better than the other - they are just different. Pick one, ride it for a while, sell it, and ride another later.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmac
    Gonz - The same things could have been said with a little mollycoddling and would have made them easier to swallow. Not a requirement (of course). This post came across as if you had just completed a frenetic religious/social/political battle with people you consider complete idiots. (Not that I am trying to read your mind or anything ).
    I understand what you and SSINGA are trying to say.

    I simply disagree.

    in all truth, I toned down my usual content for the purpose of my original 6x6 point battle post above.

    where did I say something that is so offensive? seems to me each of my points for each of the 2 bikes is pretty factual. do you think otherwise?

    if someone wants a completely vague and noncommittal review of the Nomad, they can look at the recent DIRT magazine review.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy
    Why not chat with some of the Nomad owners and see what they think? Most really love their bike so they can give you more scoop. I don't think 1 is necessarily better than the other - they are just different. Pick one, ride it for a while, sell it, and ride another later.
    yeah, pick the Nomad first, ride it for up to 7 months (or when the 3d rate bearings start getting noisy) and then sell it.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonzostrike
    Patrick, I think you'll find that Speedgoat's prices typically are higher than even MSRP.
    I think the way Speedgoat prices a complete bike makes their prices fairly competitive. They have a system that starts giving you a 'discount' the more you buy. By the time you select the whole bike, you get it fairly nice. They don't charge manual labour for the build, and include some stuff like cables.

  32. #32
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    Pedal feedback

    The Nomad has a smoother pedal kickback than a Heckler, but actually more cadence feedback from seated pedaling through larger rock gardens and from standing pedaling on smooth trail than the Heckler.

    The Spot has no detectable pedal feedback.

    The Spot has a steeper seat tube angle for an easier climbing position over the pedals. Although you'll stand up sooner to shift weight rearward going downhill on the spot (not a bad trait, the bike becomes more nimble handling).

    Trademark VPP is only better than low monopivot monopivot or Horst link for sprint racing acceleration. It does ride better than high monopivot in smoothing out chainstay growth caused pedal feedback. Coming off a Specialized the VPP will feel much more efficient pedaling and stable, but you'll notice the pedal feedback. The Spot is also more stable due to slacker steering geometry and will feel a little more efficient than Specialized and without any noticeable feedback.

    The BB height isn't an issue with the Nomad. It remains at the same height with each pedal stroke and rises with harder pedaling. The Spot will hit obstacles with the pedals more often.

    I'm rambling. But there are noticeable feedback differences. Strong hard riders and first-time full suspension riders would probably like the Nomad performance better. Smoother riders, stronger or not, would prefer the Spot.



    - ray

  33. #33
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    No Doubt

    Quote Originally Posted by gonzostrike
    Patrick, I think you'll find that Speedgoat's prices typically are higher than even MSRP.
    They have a great selections and are good if you need a hard to find item and don't want to wait for your LBS or favorite ELBS GORIDE/Larry/Chad to order it. Otherwise I usually don't order from Speedgoat. They are friendly with good CS, they just have higher prices than most. Back in the day they used to have free shipping, but no mas.
    "And I shout that your all fakes and you should have seen the look on your face"

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    I think the way Speedgoat prices a complete bike makes their prices fairly competitive. They have a system that starts giving you a 'discount' the more you buy. By the time you select the whole bike, you get it fairly nice. They don't charge manual labour for the build, and include some stuff like cables.
    maybe fairly competitive for Bling Worshipping Toads, but if you are building a performance oriented bike, I guarantee that if you shop around you will find better prices with better builds elsewhere.

    if you need brick-and-mortar/eLBS combo shops, you probably can't beat Go-Ride.

    not sayin' that Speedgoat sucks, not at all. just commenting on the pricing. there's a good reason they implemented the "price matching" gig, and it's not because they already had low prices. eh what?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpenglow
    They have a great selections and are good if you need a hard to find item and don't want to wait for your LBS or favorite ELBS GORIDE/Larry/Chad to order it. Otherwise I usually don't order from Speedgoat. They are friendly with good CS, they just have higher prices than most. Back in the day they used to have free shipping, but no mas.
    that's the point. they are VERY nice, VERY helpful, and have a good selection. those are bonuses.

    they have VERY FRIENDLY customer service. that's a bonus.

    it really depends on what you want or need from that shop that sells you parts or a bike.

  36. #36
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    That's funny

    Quote Originally Posted by Prof
    They should also throw in an Ipod to mask the noise they make before the bearings finally die.
    A friend of mine from STL rides a blur, and always has his iPod on so he won't have to listen to his bike squeak. The noise and lack of mud clearance has him Flux shopping.

  37. #37
    jrm
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    Any Flux 29er news?

    pics...info..bueller..bueller...

  38. #38
    Now with flavor!!
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    Turner builds better bikes.

    5 spots also have a very intuitive suspension progression curve making them feel pretty balanced in just about every riding situation. Nomads most certainly do not have this feel. They blow throught the travel and without some serious shock tinkering, end up too far in the stroke for a lot of "normal" riding scenarios.

    In my opinion the only thing the nomad has going for it is that it feels smoother over really fast sharp hits because there's a bit of a rearward axle path initially which the turner doesn't have.

    And this is from someone who rides an enduro with a 6.6 in the mail.

    Get the turner.
    STRAVA: Enabling dorks everywhere to get trails shut down........ all for the sake of a race on the internet.

  39. #39
    No, that's not phonetic
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    The Woo brings up an interesting point. If you want a VPP trail bike, definitely get the 6.6 and not the Nomad. Imo, the 6.6 has much nicer ride and handling characteristics.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  40. #40
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    tscheezy,

    My problem is Intense doesn't make an XL or I'll be all over trying a 6.6!

    Paul

  41. #41
    CAK
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    Or...

    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    The Woo brings up an interesting point. If you want a VPP trail bike, definitely get the 6.6 and not the Nomad. Imo, the 6.6 has much nicer ride and handling characteristics.
    For that matter a Reign which, I feel has a nicer riding suspension than both the Nomad, Spot and 6.6. It's also right in the middle of travel between the Spot and Nomad.

    I think tscheezy reviewed one from interbike dirt demo and like it. I frick'in love mine. Feels like a couch going down and climbs like a goat going up. Anyway, just a thought.

    I'd Kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.

  42. #42
    trail fairy
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    The Regin only goes up to a 20inch inch not big enough either! Note hes a bit over 6'4"

    Go with the Spot, mines takin a stack of abuse to date and still keeps trucking!
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  43. #43
    CAK
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    Nope...

    they have a 21" which appears inline with the geometry he posted.



    One thing to note, The wheelbase, H/A and S/A specs are way off on that chart. My 16" has a 43.75 inch wheelbase a 68.5 degree head angle and a 71 degree seat tube angle (very Nomad Like). I'm not sure what this translates to on the XL frame, but it does appear at least on my 16" frame that Giant posted it's wheelbase under the 18" frame, one frame size off.

    See this post for more details:

    Giant Reigns Frame Geo Specs Are Way Off?

    Hope this helps!
    I'd Kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAK
    The wheelbase, H/A and S/A specs are way off on that chart.

    According to this chart it also seems that the smallest frame size has the least standover. I assume that is a mistake. Maybe not and these bikes just have wacked out geometry.

    I think maybe Giant should start doing their proof-reading and editing in America instead of overseas.


  45. #45
    CAK
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    Actually

    the bike geometry is great, agreed that Giants chart is indeed lacking however the chart doesn't take away from it's ride.
    I'd Kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    The Woo brings up an interesting point. If you want a VPP trail bike, definitely get the 6.6 and not the Nomad. Imo, the 6.6 has much nicer ride and handling characteristics.
    Having ridden the 6.6, and owned a Spot and a Pack, now riding a Nomad, I couldn't disagree more.

    The 6.6 I rode had too steep a head angle (with a Z1 Light at 150mm), and felt tall and tippy. It rode like a big XC bike, which maybe some folks like. It felt not at all like a bike I'd want to fly down a fast DH section on.

    The Nomad handles great with the 66SL at 160mm, and only feels slightly raked out at 170mm. I tried 150mm and that felt good too, but the longer travel settings don't seem to make the bike wander on climbs, so why not? Seems like the long stays help here (they do take some getting used to with manualing and the like, but no big deal once acclimated).

    I seem to sit "in" the bike nicely on the Nomad. I really like the way the suspension takes square-edged hits without hanging up. The low-ish BB hasn't resulted in more pedal strikes than the Pack, which surprised me.

    I'll post a complete review/comparison in a bit, but the first 200+ miles give the impression that the Nomad has a similar ride to the Pack, at least as proficient on the downhills. It climbs better than the Pack in local conditions, i.e. short, steep climbs that don't allow you to settle into a rhythm. This bike likes to be accelerated, and it's pretty indifferent to less than smooth power output (read: mashing) when this is necessary. It squats less than a Pack while climbing, and the 6.6 (and the Reign I've ridden) had the same traits.

    I ride with a lot of sport level XC racers during the week, and some fast recreational riders. Several have commented that I'm faster and smoother on the Nomad than before. I could keep up on the Pack, but I'm keeping up (and often leading) on the Nomad with less effort, it seems. The VPP seems to make it easier to maintain speed by staying in a big gear over rolling terrain.

    I do have reservations regarding the bearings, and will keep y'all posted as to any issues. So far, so good.

    We have sold 5 at the shop so far, with almost every customer who takes a demo Nomad out for the afternoon coming back trying to figure out how to afford one. And some of these guys have very nice bikes already.

    I dunno if it was poor setup on the Interbike demo you guys tried or what, but I friggin' love this bike.
    Registered Dietitian, Cycling Coach, Ascend Nutrition and Coaching

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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAK
    the bike geometry is great, agreed that Giants chart is indeed lacking however the chart doesn't take away from it's ride.
    I was kind of being facetious with my "wacked-out geometry" comment. I didn't really think that the smallest frame had the least standover clearance. My LBS is a dealer, maybe I'll be able throw a leg over one sometimes soon (and it's not like I can find a Turner dealer locally).

    Patrick

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