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  1. #1
    LGB
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Creak-spot: cry for help

    For the benefit of trail-users and wildlife alike, help quiet the forests by giving me a few pointers on silencing an incorrigible creak in the main pivot area of my 6-week old 5-spot!!

    I've lubed/re-greased just about everything, but as a newby, I'm a little wary of a bushing tear-down. Is this a typical symptom of "break-in"??

    I've noticed that the creak subsides after getting the BB area wet in a creek crossing, etc. (ironically "creek" cancels "creak"). Any good reason not to indulge my reoccuring fantasy of just soaking the outside of the o-rings with my favorite light lube such as light machine oil?

    Desperately, LGB

  2. #2
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    Misery Loves Company

    Quote Originally Posted by LGB
    For the benefit of trail-users and wildlife alike, help quiet the forests by giving me a few pointers on silencing an incorrigible creak in the main pivot area of my 6-week old 5-spot!!

    I've lubed/re-greased just about everything, but as a newby, I'm a little wary of a bushing tear-down. Is this a typical symptom of "break-in"??

    I've noticed that the creak subsides after getting the BB area wet in a creek crossing, etc. (ironically "creek" cancels "creak"). Any good reason not to indulge my reoccuring fantasy of just soaking the outside of the o-rings with my favorite light lube such as light machine oil?

    Desperately, LGB
    Sorry I can't really help because I have the same issue on a 6 week old 5-Spot too. First off, I am pathetic when it comes to bike maintenance, so I am afraid to touch almost anything. My creak seems to go away when riding on the road to the trail, but as soon as I hit dirt, its there. I have not gone to war and tried any remedies/eliminations. It could be anything, seatpost, saddle, BB, shock, shock eyelet, pivots, cables, blah, blah, blah. Please help me too.

  3. #3
    No, that's not phonetic
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    First, I would make sure there is no dust on the faces of the spring on the Romic. You can even put a light layer of grease on the metal-on-metal surfaces to stop any noise from there. My Romic makes lots of noises, quite a bit of it from the spring. Also make sure the noise is not from the eyelets by pulling the reducers out, spinning them 90, then pop them back in. The pivots would most likely not "creak". They would squeak if anything. Make sure the bb threads are lubed well (with thick, sticky grease) and the bb is tight in the shell. Make sure the chainrings are snug and there is no dirt between the spider and rings. Make sure you seatpost is greased. Basically the creak is the result of a metal-on-metal interface, and most likely not the pivots which only have metal on derlin interfaces. You can drop a drop of chain lube on each o-ring for a quick pivot sqeak silencing. If you are like me, it is your spring making noise though...

    tscheezy
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  4. #4
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    It's not that hard.......

    First of all you should be talking to Tscheezy........he is the guy with the answers.
    Go to the Turner web site or at the bottom of tscheezy replies there is a web site to go to where there is step by step instructions on bushings - everything you want to know about Pivot Points. How to maintain them, overhaul and all that good stuff. (Turner_tech)

    Not sure how long of a break-in period is needed???
    Your probably going to have to take your pivot apart to check your bushings and shaft.
    If your problem don not get better......

    I followed the instructions and found them to be very helpful. If you get the right tools it is very simple. (I also am a newby to owning a Turner.........however I am handy and love to tinker around on my bikes.)

    Also a few weeks ago there was someone was asking about creaking in there bb or something like that. You will probably find your answer in there also..........

    KC

  5. #5
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    Agree with TS

    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    First, I would make sure there is no dust on the faces of the spring on the Romic. You can even put a light layer of grease on the metal-on-metal surfaces to stop any noise from there. My Romic makes lots of noises, quite a bit of it from the spring. Also make sure the noise is not from the eyelets by pulling the reducers out, spinning them 90, then pop them back in. The pivots would most likely not "creak". They would squeak if anything. Make sure the bb threads are lubed well (with thick, sticky grease) and the bb is tight in the shell. Make sure the chainrings are snug and there is no dirt between the spider and rings. Make sure you seatpost is greased. Basically the creak is the result of a metal-on-metal interface, and most likely not the pivots which only have metal on derlin interfaces. You can drop a drop of chain lube on each o-ring for a quick pivot sqeak silencing. If you are like me, it is your spring making noise though...

    tscheezy
    It's most likely the romic spring...not the pivots.

    If you do decide to put a drop of lube on the pivots.......Make sure they are clean first.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    Sorry I can't really help because I have the same issue on a 6 week old 5-Spot too. First off, I am pathetic when it comes to bike maintenance, so I am afraid to touch almost anything. My creak seems to go away when riding on the road to the trail, but as soon as I hit dirt, its there. I have not gone to war and tried any remedies/eliminations. It could be anything, seatpost, saddle, BB, shock, shock eyelet, pivots, cables, blah, blah, blah. Please help me too.
    There's already a lot of good advice here but I'll chime in...

    Eliminating creaks may seem more of an art, but it's really a science if you're methodical about it. Keep in mind that outside above the bike it can be hard to pinpoint the source. Metal especally tubes can act as transmission lines and make the sound appear to come from elsewhere. There are also a variety of possible sources in one general area.

    Grease your seatpost and seat rails and seat clamp. It's easy and will take it out of the equasion. Next go into you quiet little personal workshop and try to cycle the suspension to see where the creak is coming from. Then unbolt the top of the shock and do it again and see if it's still there.

    If you're still having trouble you can try removing the shock spring (hold your breath if this makes you nervous ) and bolt the shock back on and test again. While you're messing with the shock check the reducers and eyelets for play and wear...Don't grease them though. The Romic manual says that's a no-no. (there's a whole thread on that below)

    Remember to clean and lube the spring outer flats and points where the coils touch each other when compressing. Others have reported finding a creak there.

    Check you cables. I once found my cables rubbed against each other and made a creak-like sound. Someone reported that his cable housings creaked when they were bending.

    When pushing down on the bike try putting pressure on it from different locations like the seat, the post, the pedals etc...JIC.

    Tscheezy's advice about the BB and spring are great points. I don't think it would be very easy for water to get inside the pivots, It's probably easier to get into the BB. I recommend greasing the pivots before bothering with a full tear-down. Just don't over pressurize them. Pump just enough greas until you feel resistance. Otherwise the back pressure can push the zerk right out of the frame.

    G'luck...just be persistant, and methodical, you'll find the source eventually.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  7. #7
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    Thanks and More Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    There's already a lot of good advice here but I'll chime in...

    Eliminating creaks may seem more of an art, but it's really a science if you're methodical about it. Keep in mind that outside above the bike it can be hard to pinpoint the source. Metal especally tubes can act as transmission lines and make the sound appear to come from elsewhere. There are also a variety of possible sources in one general area.

    Grease your seatpost and seat rails and seat clamp. It's easy and will take it out of the equasion. Next go into you quiet little personal workshop and try to cycle the suspension to see where the creak is coming from. Then unbolt the top of the shock and do it again and see if it's still there.

    If you're still having trouble you can try removing the shock spring (hold your breath if this makes you nervous ) and bolt the shock back on and test again. While you're messing with the shock check the reducers and eyelets for play and wear...Don't grease them though. The Romic manual says that's a no-no. (there's a whole thread on that below)

    Remember to clean and lube the spring outer flats and points where the coils touch each other when compressing. Others have reported finding a creak there.

    Check you cables. I once found my cables rubbed against each other and made a creak-like sound. Someone reported that his cable housings creaked when they were bending.

    When pushing down on the bike try putting pressure on it from different locations like the seat, the post, the pedals etc...JIC.

    Tscheezy's advice about the BB and spring are great points. I don't think it would be very easy for water to get inside the pivots, It's probably easier to get into the BB. I recommend greasing the pivots before bothering with a full tear-down. Just don't over pressurize them. Pump just enough greas until you feel resistance. Otherwise the back pressure can push the zerk right out of the frame.

    G'luck...just be persistant, and methodical, you'll find the source eventually.
    Thanks for the info. I have more questions though. I am very pathetic with maintenance. I tried to install a fancy brake cable guide on the fork and frayed the cable and could not figure out how the guide worked. This is a very easy and simple job that I could not do. My questions are:

    1. Unbolting the Top of the Shock - Do I need a torque wrench to rebolt or can I just tighten by touch? Is this really just a matter of unbolting and rebolting an allen bolt, or is there more? Is there a right way and wrong way the bolt can go back in?

    2. Removing the Spring - Does it just slide out from the top after unbolting the shock? How do I reinstall? I have a new spring to try, but am afraid of installation. Is the part that interfaces at the botom of the spring used to adjust preload and if so, where is zero preload, just touching the spring, with more preload tightening up towards the top of the shock?

    3. What are/where are the reducers and eyelets?

    4. Can I just spray some lube on the areas of the spring that touch metal (top and bottom)?

    5. I tried greasing the pivots with a proper grease gun and all I seemed to do was make a mess of grease. That is, I pushed the grease gun until grease came out, but it did not go inside to the pivots, it just spewed off to the sides.

    I know, I am sad. I was once able to take down and rebuild my Colnago road bike years ago, but am afraid to touch anything else. I don't really have "two left hands" either.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    Thanks for the info. I have more questions though. I am very pathetic with maintenance. I tried to install a fancy brake cable guide on the fork and frayed the cable and could not figure out how the guide worked. This is a very easy and simple job that I could not do. My questions are:

    1. Unbolting the Top of the Shock - Do I need a torque wrench to rebolt or can I just tighten by touch? Is this really just a matter of unbolting and rebolting an allen bolt, or is there more? Is there a right way and wrong way the bolt can go back in?.
    FIRST: Turn the preload nut on the shock to remove any preload. In fact, you can turn the nut until it hits the bottom of the shock body. The only thing that holds the shock in place is the bolt and nut (top and bottom). The order, starting with the bolt head side is bolt - washer-rocker arm - shock with bushing and reducers - rocker arm - washer - nut.

    It helps to have a torque wrench to retighten. I'm sure someone here will post the torque specs. I'll post them when I get home if nobady else has. You don't need a torque wrench, but it helps. Make sure that you hold the nut with a wrench while turning the hex bolt.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    2. Removing the Spring - Does it just slide out from the top after unbolting the shock? How do I reinstall? I have a new spring to try, but am afraid of installation. Is the part that interfaces at the botom of the spring used to adjust preload and if so, where is zero preload, just touching the spring, with more preload tightening up towards the top of the shock?
    After you unbolt the top of the shock, swing it away from the frame mounts so you can remove the spring.
    The "spring keeper" (for lack of the real name) that holds the spring in place at the top, can now be removed. Push down slightly and just pull the keeper off of the shock. You'll notice that the keeper has a notch to allow for this. After the keeper is removed, the spring will just lift off of the shock.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    3. What are/where are the reducers and eyelets?
    The reducers are the aluminum interface between the shock and the rockers (top of shock) and between the shock and frame mount on the bottom. The reducers fit into a bushing that is mounted in the top and bottom of the shock (in the eyelets of the shock)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    4. Can I just spray some lube on the areas of the spring that touch metal (top and bottom)?
    No, not a good idea. Don't spray lube in that area. In fact, try to avoid all spray lubes as it's difficult to control where it goes. Just put a dab of grease on a finger and rub it onto the top and bottom mating surfaces of the spring


    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    5. I tried greasing the pivots with a proper grease gun and all I seemed to do was make a mess of grease. That is, I pushed the grease gun until grease came out, but it did not go inside to the pivots, it just spewed off to the sides.
    If the bike is new, the grease ports may be full and not require any more. When you said "proper grease gun", did you mean the proper one for the Turner zircs?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    I know, I am sad. I was once able to take down and rebuild my Colnago road bike years ago, but am afraid to touch anything else. I don't really have "two left hands" either.
    Once you've removed and re-installed the shock once, you'll find that it's very simple. Don't forget to remove the preload on the spring BEFORE loosening any bolts.

    Good Luck.

  9. #9
    ... I guess you won't be
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    sounds like your BB is creaking, not your suspension.....

    race face or shimano is creak prone....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrGuru
    FIRST: Turn the preload nut on the shock to remove any preload. In fact, you can turn the nut until it hits the bottom of the shock body. The only thing that holds the shock in place is the bolt and nut (top and bottom). The order, starting with the bolt head side is bolt - washer-rocker arm - shock with bushing and reducers - rocker arm - washer - nut.

    It helps to have a torque wrench to retighten. I'm sure someone here will post the torque specs. I'll post them when I get home if nobady else has. You don't need a torque wrench, but it helps. Make sure that you hold the nut with a wrench while turning the hex bolt.

    Once you've removed and re-installed the shock once, you'll find that it's very simple. Don't forget to remove the preload on the spring BEFORE loosening any bolts.
    Good advice...

    Just curious, why would one have to remove all preload before unbolting the shock? I do it all the time without that step. AFAIK, the preload tension is between the shock body and the shaft end, and the spring is held between the two spring retainers: The threaded "adjustable spring retainer " on the "bottom" of the shock and the slotted "spring retainer" on the "top". Unless I'm missing something it's not going to shoot off. But it it is MUCH easier to get the spring off if you back off the preload before unbolting it... oh wait now I see what you are getting at. DUH!

    As for bolt torques unfortunately the Romic .pdf manual dosen't specify how much torque to use. I suggest that you make it very tight but don't go crazy as the bolt and nut are pretty small.

    Dirdir: Go to www.romicmfg.com to get the .pdf of the romic manual. It has specific steps on removing the spring. It's as easy as pie. It e-v-e-n h-a-s p-i-c-t-u-r-e-s for us non-mechanically inclined weekend wrenchers . But that's about all it has as far as useful info.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve3
    Hey Bikezilla, I sent you a PM. Are you interested for the Bethpage ride this Sunday? Looks like we have about a half dozen people so far.
    Kid's birthday party on Sunday. I'm missing some good riding, perfect weather and a WMBA ride and cookout at Sprain! The things we do for love.
    -BZ
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Good advice...

    Just curious, why would one have to remove all preload before unbolting the shock? I do it all the time without that step. AFAIK, the preload tension is between the shock body and the shaft end, and the spring is held between the two spring retainers: The threaded "adjustable spring retainer " on the "bottom" of the shock and the slotted "spring retainer" on the "top". Unless I'm missing something it's not going to shoot off. But it it is MUCH easier to get the spring off if you back off the preload before unbolting it... oh wait now I see what you are getting at. DUH!

    As for bolt torques unfortunately the Romic .pdf manual dosen't specify how much torque to use. I suggest that you make it very tight but don't go crazy as the bolt and nut are pretty small.

    Dirdir: Go to www.romicmfg.com to get the .pdf of the romic manual. It has specific steps on removing the spring. It's as easy as pie. It e-v-e-n h-a-s p-i-c-t-u-r-e-s for us non-mechanically inclined weekend wrenchers . But that's about all it has as far as useful info.
    Turner recommends 9 ft-lbs for al shock and linkage bolts and 17 ft-lbs for the main pivot bolt. At least that's waht is says on the card that came with the bike. I've been using those torques and so far, so good. The only bolt that these numbers don't apply to is the Horst link bolt. Just get that very snug.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrGuru
    Turner recommends 9 ft-lbs for al shock and linkage bolts and 17 ft-lbs for the main pivot bolt. At least that's waht is says on the card that came with the bike. I've been using those torques and so far, so good. The only bolt that these numbers don't apply to is the Horst link bolt. Just get that very snug.
    Tnx. The only card I got with my bike was the warranty card. I didn't see anything about shock bolt torque on the website either.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve3
    Speaking of bolt torque, I'm pretty afraid to take mine apart because of the stories of people breaking the heads off. My bolts are allen and not Torx and when i tried to back one of them out (to check tightness), it felt like it was on really really tight. Didn't feel like stripping a bolt even before I started riding it.
    If you check Tscheesy's maintenence instructions at the Turner site, you'll see that locktite is used on the pivot bolts. If that's the case, checking bolts for tightness won't work.

    If there's no play, leave it alone and just add grease to the zircs. If you want to check things, you'll have to remove the bolts...and then add more locktite when you put it back together.

    I figure I'll check mine at 1 year or if there's play....whichever comes first.

  15. #15
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    One Final Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Good advice...

    Just curious, why would one have to remove all preload before unbolting the shock? I do it all the time without that step. AFAIK, the preload tension is between the shock body and the shaft end, and the spring is held between the two spring retainers: The threaded "adjustable spring retainer " on the "bottom" of the shock and the slotted "spring retainer" on the "top". Unless I'm missing something it's not going to shoot off. But it it is MUCH easier to get the spring off if you back off the preload before unbolting it... oh wait now I see what you are getting at. DUH!

    As for bolt torques unfortunately the Romic .pdf manual dosen't specify how much torque to use. I suggest that you make it very tight but don't go crazy as the bolt and nut are pretty small.

    Dirdir: Go to www.romicmfg.com to get the .pdf of the romic manual. It has specific steps on removing the spring. It's as easy as pie. It e-v-e-n h-a-s p-i-c-t-u-r-e-s for us non-mechanically inclined weekend wrenchers . But that's about all it has as far as useful info.
    Thanks all for the great info. I checked out the Romic site, but still have one question. When installing and setting the shock up, where is the point of zero pre-load. That is, should the adjustable threaded spring retainer just touch the spring when you are at zero preload, be slightly loose, tighter?

    As to my creak, I have not confirmed, but I am now almost positive it is just the seat or seatpost. I am going to clean and grease these up tonight. Noise (except for what I know is the shock compressing, which does not bug me) is gone when standing. I think I can hanlde this job.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    Thanks all for the great info. I checked out the Romic site, but still have one question. When installing and setting the shock up, where is the point of zero pre-load. That is, should the adjustable threaded spring retainer just touch the spring when you are at zero preload, be slightly loose, tighter?
    .
    I had the same question. If I recall, the consensus was that "Zero" is where the adjustable retainer just touches the spring. I personally try to make certain there is no vertical play between the spring and the retainers, and perhaps a teensy-smidge of a turn more.

    I have also seen some people refer to "Zero" as contact plus one turn on some shocks but I don't think that is correct here. Just make certain you do not go beyond three full turns past zero. If you need more than that to get the proper sag, you need a stiffer spring.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  17. #17
    Ouch, I am hot!
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    I am Ready

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    I had the same question. If I recall, the consensus was that "Zero" is where the adjustable retainer just touches the spring. I personally try to make certain there is no vertical play between the spring and the retainers, and perhaps a teensy-smidge of a turn more.

    I have also seen some people refer to "Zero" as contact plus one turn on some shocks but I don't think that is correct here. Just make certain you do not go beyond three full turns past zero. If you need more than that to get the proper sag, you need a stiffer spring.
    Thanks. I am ready to install my new spring. I just have one more question. Just kidding.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    Thanks. I am ready to install my new spring. I just have one more question. Just kidding.
    I hope you realize after you do this, and see how simple it is, you'll feel reeeeeaaaallly embarrassed about all the questions .

    But not to worry, I'm the same way myself . I hate to wrench w/o any idea of what to expect.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  19. #19
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    Already BareAssed

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    I hope you realize after you do this, and see how simple it is, you'll feel reeeeeaaaallly embarrassed about all the questions .

    But not to worry, I'm the same way myself . I hate to wrench w/o any idea of what to expect.
    I am already ashamed of my questions and lack of skill. I somehow fu** up everything I try on the bike. I then get really angry and stamp my feet. When I first got into dirt cycling (October 2001), my headset was loose. Having an old Italian road bike that I was very familiar with mechanically, I broke out my headset wrenches and attempted to tighten the headset on my Santa Cruz. Guess what, I could not do it. Took it to the shop and the guy showed me a hex key, pointed to the top cap and charged me $5. Embarrassing.

  20. #20
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Fox's rule on preload is Zero=one full turn of spring compression from just touching. Romic's may be different, but to define zero as having the spring almost loose seems like a bad idea because some people (like me) say they run zero preload. Someone will think that means the collar is just touching the spring, will ride their bike like that and have the spring rattle all over the show. I think we should be consistent and define the zero point the way Fox does, and just say don't exceed two full turns of preload.

    My $0.02
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  21. #21
    LGB
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    Thanks & Experience

    Thanks to all for the input. I've been squirreled away in my "shop" inplementing all this great advice.

    To DirDir; I was having the same problem greasing the pivots (ie; the grease would just flow back out of the zerk), last nite I tried a different approach which got results: when you inject the grease, give the grease-gun a series of short, gentle pumps. I think this action works better to open the bead on the zerk which allows the grease to flow in.

    This is my 2nd or 3rd attempt at greasing the pivots, and the first time that I sensed that grease was actually flowing into the pivot. I was able to give it 3-4 gentle pumps before I sensed resistance, and even at that point, the grease didn't flow back out.

    The happy ending to this story is that the (dry) pivots appear (shop check only!) to have been the source of creak woes.

    Beers on me! LGB

  22. #22
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    My Results - Creaks Gone - And One Last Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    I hope you realize after you do this, and see how simple it is, you'll feel reeeeeaaaallly embarrassed about all the questions .

    But not to worry, I'm the same way myself . I hate to wrench w/o any idea of what to expect.
    Last night I replaced my spring with great success thanks to all the great help from everyone. As Bikezilla predicted, I am embarrasses at how simple it was. After a brief ride this morning, I am happy to be on the correct spring weight (550) for my size (180 lbs naked).

    I was also able to eradicate the creaks. There were two sources. The seat and/or seatpost (a very common problem). Also, the rear derailler cable (metal cap) was creaking at the interface of the cable guide on the top tube. The rear shock also has a very slight noise when engaging, ect., but that does not bother me and is, I assume, just normal. It is less nosiy and bothersome than my old air shock was on my Superlight.

    I also "shot from the hips" and tightened my 1 month old King hubs. Both hubs had the slightest play in them, but I was able to eradicte that also after reviewing King's tech info and firming up the "cone adjustment" or whatever it was. Is it possible to overtighten these? The play is gone, but the front hub or wheel makes a small noise (sounds almost like bearings going around) when I spin the wheel slowly. Not sure if this noise is new, but the wheel spins great. I know, I know, I have a problem with noises.

  23. #23
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Good to hear you silenced things. You are gonna turn into a wrenching hero if you don't watch out.

    Kings will develop play as they break-in. It is possible to overtighten them when adjusting this play out. It takes trial and error to hit the right spot of preload on the bearing. I adjust it so that I still have a TINY bit of wiggle when snugged down, then I break it free and add just a hair of preload to the adjuster cone before tightening the axles back together. I do little step-wise increments like this until I JUST have eliminated all play. To check for play I push one axle end firmly into the hub and try to wiggle the other up and down. Overdoing the preload is almost as bad as running them loose. The good news is that once you have your hubs broken in and adjusted, you are set for a very very long time. Stupendous hubs, those Kings.

    tscheezy
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  24. #24
    Ouch, I am hot!
    Reputation: Dirdir's Avatar
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    ... and if we just ... Great, Now I have more to worry about.

    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Good to hear you silenced things. You are gonna turn into a wrenching hero if you don't watch out.

    Kings will develop play as they break-in. It is possible to overtighten them when adjusting this play out. It takes trial and error to hit the right spot of preload on the bearing. I adjust it so that I still have a TINY bit of wiggle when snugged down, then I break it free and add just a hair of preload to the adjuster cone before tightening the axles back together. I do little step-wise increments like this until I JUST have eliminated all play. To check for play I push one axle end firmly into the hub and try to wiggle the other up and down. Overdoing the preload is almost as bad as running them loose. The good news is that once you have your hubs broken in and adjusted, you are set for a very very long time. Stupendous hubs, those Kings.

    tscheezy
    Now I have to worry about over as well as under tightening. When does this wrenching thing end? Oops, that is a question. I believe I have reached my limit. Have I?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    Fox's rule on preload is Zero=one full turn of spring compression from just touching. Romic's may be different, but to define zero as having the spring almost loose seems like a bad idea because some people (like me) say they run zero preload. Someone will think that means the collar is just touching the spring, will ride their bike like that and have the spring rattle all over the show. I think we should be consistent and define the zero point the way Fox does, and just say don't exceed two full turns of preload.

    My $0.02
    The definition of zero preload that BZ gave came direct from Romic. I ride using a 500# spring with 1/2 turn from the Romic zero point. By your definition, I would have to specify my preload as a negative number (-0.5 turns). The spring doesn't rattle and I get the preload that I want.

    How about setting the the Zero point like Romic suggests (even with the Fox recommendation, you still need a zero point to determine where 1 turn would be) and specifying that the preload should be from 0.5 to 3 turns.

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