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  1. #1
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    Bottoming out the Burner

    I've searched for this with no success, so here goes: I've been riding my Burner for about 2 months now, and I've noticed that the suspension is bottoming out quite a bit - I'm not basing this on the o-ring, but on the 3 times I've been thrown OTB when my pedals hit roots 3-4" tall. Bike is set up with the Manitou 3 way shock, 165 psi and 130ish SPV, 195 lbs riding weight. From what I've seen in the forums, the pressure seem to be right, and higher shock pressures tend to make the ride too stiff for me...

    My question is this: would switching over to the Float shock help this? Anyone else have this problem or any suggestions? Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    www.derbyrims.com
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    Try taller tires

    Quote Originally Posted by dennisbd99
    I've searched for this with no success, so here goes: I've been riding my Burner for about 2 months now, and I've noticed that the suspension is bottoming out quite a bit - I'm not basing this on the o-ring, but on the 3 times I've been thrown OTB when my pedals hit roots 3-4" tall. Bike is set up with the Manitou 3 way shock, 165 psi and 130ish SPV, 195 lbs riding weight. From what I've seen in the forums, the pressure seem to be right, and higher shock pressures tend to make the ride too stiff for me...

    My question is this: would switching over to the Float shock help this? Anyone else have this problem or any suggestions? Thanks for your help!
    The Float R should get the same deep travel range as your Swinger. Some riders say it performs better with the Burner, but it won't make any significant difference in pedal clearance.

    Other than rider judgment of clearance, Bottom Bracket height matters for pedals clearing obstacles.

    Turner bikes have relatively average to low BB height for the travel compared to other manufactures. Low BB height produce more stable handling, but obviously at the cost of less trail obstacle clearance.

    You could try fitting taller tires like 2.4. for that extra quarter to half inch of clearance that might make all the difference in hitting or missing those roots that jump up out of the ground and knock you off the bike. There are some great lightweight fast rolling 2.3 to 2.5 tires available now. And the bike rides even smoother. I'm not sure how big of tire the Burner fits.



    - ray

  3. #3
    outclassed by his bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by dennisbd99
    Bike is set up with the Manitou 3 way shock, 165 psi and 130ish SPV, 195 lbs riding weight. From what I've seen in the forums, the pressure seem to be right, and higher shock pressures tend to make the ride too stiff for me...
    Try backing off the SPV significantly and upping the pressure in the main chamber as needed to compensate. Quite a few of us who have used this shock with Burners have found it necessary to run low SPV pressure to get a compliant ride.

  4. #4
    rr
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    Your psi settings sound good, maybe a tad high on the spv, I ran around 115 psi at 200lbs. How much sag are you getting at 165psi? and whats your rebound setting? Too little rebound will give you that OTB feeling when going down steep or rocky terrain.

    I switched to an RP3 later which is a bit smoother than the swinger but I doubt it will help with any bottoming issues. What fork are you riding? a lower A>C fork will lower the BB height.

  5. #5
    mouthbreather
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    Does the o-ring bottom quite a bit? Do you hear a bottom-out clanking? If your pedals are hitting obstacles, I dont think that is an indication of the suspension bottoming out, but just your pedal clearance.

    When hitting obstacles going downhill, it's important to keep them level. When climbing, I do need to time my stroke to avoid pedal-to-root/rock contact.

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