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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN View Post
    I agree on the '11 geo changes. The last two days I rode the '11 after the prior 4 rides on the '10. The '11 is just better in every way. Climbing and descending it is "faster" than the '10.
    Good call on the geo changes starting 2011 - it does make a huge difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by KRob View Post
    I wouldn't say that the new Endorphin falls far short of the 5 Spot. It's just a different class of bike (despite the fact that they're both 140mm). The new Endorphin is much more XC/Trail oriented. Fast, firm, and light. More comparable to a Flux, or Mojo SL from my brief ride on it and from what others have said.
    Well put. I hadn't thought about it in those terms but the Endo & the Spot really are in different classes. I suppose what's deceptive is that by looking at the travel/geo, it's easy make the assumption that its apples-to-apples.

    I'd agree that the Spot really spans the middle between the Endo & Chili - (off-topic: ) I wish we had the legendary phantom RFX & new vaporware Delirium to see how the vertical compares.
    ¡Geaux Tigers! - ¡Visca el Barça!


  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by LncNuvue View Post
    My Endo was a 1/2 lighter than my Spot but pedaled like a heavier bike. It wasn't good enough on the downs to justify the lackluster climbing. The bar was set high since I was comparing it directly to my Spot, same build, etc. IMO the beauty of the DW Link as it's applied to the Spot is that there's no compromise when setting up the suspension. Dial it to bomb the downs and it still climbs like a goat without flipping any levers.

    Based on how the Endo climbed there is no way I would have liked a Chili for the trails I ride most.
    That makes sense. I didn't realize you didn't like how the Endo climbed. Definitely sounds like a dw-link and anti-squat over 4x4/HL with more squat preference.

    I agree then, if you didn't like how the Endo climbed you would've hated the Chili (on the climbs).

    I also agree that Turner's version of the dw-link is the best out there. More plush and responsive yet still solid and firm on smooth climbs and sprints than some of the other short-mid travel iterations out there.

  3. #28
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    Rode the 2012 5-spot, Burner demo and Knolly Chilcotin . . .

    As someone else mentioned, Chilcotin feels more burly, free ride oriented, sweet rig with a bottomless suspension but definitely more gravity oriented.

    Burner, not to sound hackish but it does retain most qualities of 26 with the roll-ability, momentum and speed of a niner. Wasn't pinning it on this ride but grabbed 2 strava PRs so hard to argue with the end results. The only situations I noticed the larger wheel size were 4' or greater drops in which they felt a tad awkward, just my personal feeling and probably something one becomes familiar with over time. This is also only 5 seconds of 2 hour ride so one would need to prioritize.

    Love the Spot, leaning toward one as my next ride. Call me 26" grouch but I just have more fun on the smaller wheels. If I ever get serious about racing I think the times laid down on larger wheels speaks for it self though.

    Turner wins hands down on build quality. Frame welds, anodizing, the attention to detail is amazing!

  4. #29
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    Anything really better out there than the Spot? -- > NONE!

  5. #30
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    Can a spot stack up well against a nomad or an ibis hd as far as enduro racing is concerned?

    I own a spot and I love it!!

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGavin View Post
    Can a spot stack up well against a nomad or an ibis hd as far as enduro racing is concerned?

    I own a spot and I love it!!
    As far as I can tell so far, my DW Spot stacks up against my RFX and outperforms it.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by LGavin View Post
    Can a spot stack up well against a nomad or an ibis hd as far as enduro racing is concerned?
    The Mojo HD could take a 180mm fork, whereas the Spot could not. That is the Spots limitation, but if you where happy with a 160mm fork then maybe (from what I have read on this forum) the Spot is as good/ better.

    The power of "Internet Speculation" is very strong. I read that there is a lot of love for the Mojo HD at the moment as a defacto standard for the super enduro race scene. Prior to reading this thread I was thinking that the next logical progression from the Spot was 160mm rear travel frame, and that this pointed towards the Mojo HD, however after reading the knowledgeable comments above I now appreciate that my Spot is well, spot on. I wouldn't want to run a 180mm fork anyhow.

    My future is pointing towards another Spot or a Burner. Need a Lyrik class fork for a 27.5er first though.
    Last edited by deanopatoni; 01-04-2013 at 02:58 AM.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanopatoni View Post
    Need a Lyrik class fork for a 27.5er first though.
    +1 on this.

  9. #34
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    Spot. Aka. Mojohd killer

  10. #35
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    Spot. Aka. Mojohd killer

  11. #36
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    So many good bikes now a days. It is tough for a company like Turner. I like Turner because of the durability of them and the customer support.

  12. #37
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    Oh, and there's the Firebird, that too......
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    Delirium is.
    I own a ' 11 Delirium and an '05 Spot. I have just got my hands on a '12 Spot to replace the '05, but havent built it up yet. Im not sure you can fairly compare the 170mm Delirium with the 140mm Spot? They are a different class of bike in my opinion. Sure, you 'can' pedal the Delirium on most trails, but will it work as well as the Spot? My opinion is no. Likewise, will the Spot descend as well as a Delirium? Not in my experience.
    I believe the OP was trying to compare bikes in the same class, these two bikes are definitely different breeds.

    Buzz

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by LncNuvue View Post
    Based on how the Endo climbed there is no way I would have liked a Chili for the trails I ride most.
    I have no experience on a DW 5-Spot but as you may remember from a previous thread, I spent a week in Sedona riding a Mojo HD last November. I loved the Mojo HD, I thought it was a brilliant bike and a lot of fun to ride. I knew that it wasn't as planted and stable as the Chilcotin but really appreciated the pedaling characteristics.

    In December, I went back to Arizona and this time I brought my bike, a Knolly Chilcotin. I was fully prepared to experience disappointment in the pedaling department and was hoping that the downhills would make up for it. Conditions were also much worse than in November: recent rains had left the dirt tacky but the slickrock very true to its name. Lo and behold, the Chilcotin really surprised me: not only it killed it on the downhills but it provided ridiculous traction on the climbs. I have never cleaned as much of this Highline and Hogs climbs as I did this time around. The bite out of the 4x4 suspension was truly unexpected.

    I don't know if overall I was faster on the Mojo HD or the Chilcotin. However, the difference in traction and stability was quite noticeable. The HD had a Conti TK 2.2 UST Black Chili front and rear tires and Fox 34 Float CTD/Float CTD fork and shock, while my bike had a Minion DHF 2.5/Schwalbe HD Trailstar front/rear tires, and Lyrik 170/CCDB Air fork/shock combo.

    Ultimately, I would be very happy on either bike. If I could have them both I would ride the HD one day and the Chilcotin the next. As a "big" bike, I prefer the Chilcotin and live with the slightly less crisp pedaling, which becomes a small trade-off with a well tuned quality rear shock. For a more all-round trail bike on less demanding terrain, I would probably prefer the HD.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by nybike1971 View Post
    I have no experience on a DW 5-Spot but as you may remember from a previous thread, I spent a week in Sedona riding a Mojo HD last November. I loved the Mojo HD, I thought it was a brilliant bike and a lot of fun to ride. I knew that it wasn't as planted and stable as the Chilcotin but really appreciated the pedaling characteristics.

    In December, I went back to Arizona and this time I brought my bike, a Knolly Chilcotin. I was fully prepared to experience disappointment in the pedaling department and was hoping that the downhills would make up for it. Conditions were also much worse than in November: recent rains had left the dirt tacky but the slickrock very true to its name. Lo and behold, the Chilcotin really surprised me: not only it killed it on the downhills but it provided ridiculous traction on the climbs. I have never cleaned as much of this Highline and Hogs climbs as I did this time around. The bite out of the 4x4 suspension was truly unexpected.

    I don't know if overall I was faster on the Mojo HD or the Chilcotin. However, the difference in traction and stability was quite noticeable. The HD had a Conti TK 2.2 UST Black Chili front and rear tires and Fox 34 Float CTD/Float CTD fork and shock, while my bike had a Minion DHF 2.5/Schwalbe HD Trailstar front/rear tires, and Lyrik 170/CCDB Air fork/shock combo.

    Ultimately, I would be very happy on either bike. If I could have them both I would ride the HD one day and the Chilcotin the next. As a "big" bike, I prefer the Chilcotin and live with the slightly less crisp pedaling, which becomes a small trade-off with a well tuned quality rear shock. For a more all-round trail bike on less demanding terrain, I would probably prefer the HD.
    Makes sense...._dw link is for non-technical.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  16. #41
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    Comparing my DW Spot to the Chili, the Spot feels like you're squirting forward as you pedal while the Chili feels like it hunkers down and claws over the chunder. While not as "crisp" as the DW, the Chili surprisingly holds its own pedaling/climbing.

    Honestly, I think the Chili is a bigger class of bike than the Spot - it's my RFX placeholder (not playing second fiddle to anything mind you as it is a stellar bike). However, if Dave ever gets an asian factory slot squared away to produce the DW RFX, I'll be ready to plunk $$$ down for it.
    ¡Geaux Tigers! - ¡Visca el Barça!


  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by nybike1971 View Post
    ...I don't know if overall I was faster on the Mojo HD or the Chilcotin. However, the difference in traction and stability was quite noticeable. The HD had a Conti TK 2.2 UST Black Chili front and rear tires and Fox 34 Float CTD/Float CTD fork and shock, while my bike had a Minion DHF 2.5/Schwalbe HD Trailstar front/rear tires, and Lyrik 170/CCDB Air fork/shock combo...
    I'd venture a wager than if the HD was built up with a proper fork like the Lyrik and some meatier rubber (although the TK 2.2s aren't too shabby) you'd find it plenty more planted and stable.

    Nevertheless, I haven't ridden the Chilcotin but I'd imagine the suspension squats quite a bit on the climbs akin to the Horst Link as the additional linkage pieces control the shock rate not suspension behavior.

    _MK
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  18. #43
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    Here's a great vid showing off the HD in the wild:
    (after all, it's Friday)

    Leaf Peeping on Lithium from Andrew Whiteford on Vimeo.



    _MK
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  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_ View Post
    I'd venture a wager than if the HD was built up with a proper fork like the Lyrik and some meatier rubber (although the TK 2.2s aren't too shabby) you'd find it plenty more planted and stable.

    Nevertheless, I haven't ridden the Chilcotin but I'd imagine the suspension squats quite a bit on the climbs akin to the Horst Link as the additional linkage pieces control the shock rate not suspension behavior.

    _MK
    I actually enjoyed the new Fox 34 Float CTD 160 quite a bit. In the trail setting it did everything it should and was very composed. The air spring was finally on the money, gone is the super-progressive feel of every Fox air spring I have tried before and the damping was well matched to the spring.

    It's shorter than a Fox 36 or Lyrik but the steeper head angle wasn't a deal breaker. I rode several of the steeper trails in Sedona and never felt sketched out. The whole bike was incredibly precise on the steep and exposed moves, and as I said I really thought it was a brilliant bike.

    I also had a chance to try the bike shop owner's personal HD built with a Vivid Air and a Lyrik RC2 DH 170. Unfortunately the trails I took it on where not the steepest but as far as climbing goes, the HD "lite" with the shorter fork was much more sprightly and maneuverable. Downhill, the Vivid provided a more controlled and smooth ride.

    If I could only have one bike, it probably would be it. Given that I am lucky and have more dedicated frames, I chose to separate my bikes a bit more.

    The Trail King really impressed me as well, so much so that I have bought a 2.2 and 2.4 to ride on my bikes. I reached for the TK 2.2 UST in Phoenix but was not able to set it up tubeless (weak compressor at my friend's house and I did not have a rim strip with me), so on the Hans Dampf went.

    The Chilcotin pedals very differently from Turner TNT and HL bikes. It's very neutral and certainly doesn't surge with every pedal stroke like a DW link bike, but it also doesn't squat the way other 4-bar bikes I have ridden in the past. cheezwhip said it very well, it digs in and crawls over stuff without feeling sluggish.

    A big difference with the HD is frame weight. A medium Chilcotin with a CCDB Air shock is 8.2lbs if I remember correctly, so almost two pounds heavier than the HD.

    Sorry for all this HD talk, but in a thread that asks about competition for the 5 Spot, I feel that this is one of the most relevant frames. At the Whole Enchilada enduro race in Moab the two frames that recurred most frequently were the Yeti SB-66 and the Ibis Mojo HD. I saw 3 Chilcotins (me, Dusty Bottoms, and another dude), 1 DW Sultan (this is really a course made for 29ers: Kelli Emmett schooled most of the guys on her Anthem X 29) and Krispy from Go-ride on his SB-95, among other bikes.

  20. #45
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    Fantastic riding! And very well shot, too. Lots of camera angles and multiple perspectives really show off the skills. Makes the HD look like a hell of a ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by MK_ View Post
    Here's a great vid showing off the HD in the wild:
    (after all, it's Friday)

    Leaf Peeping on Lithium from Andrew Whiteford on Vimeo.



    _MK
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  21. #46
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    That was a cool video!

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_ View Post
    Here's a great vid showing off the HD in the wild:
    (after all, it's Friday)

    Leaf Peeping on Lithium from Andrew Whiteford on Vimeo.



    _MK

    amazing video. love that dog by the way, wish i had a trail riding companion like that
    "Live dangerously and you live right."
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  23. #48
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    The cool thing about a 5 spot is that having a E stay can fit a sealed drive without modifying the frame
    I need one now!!!

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_ View Post
    Here's a great vid showing off the HD in the wild:
    (after all, it's Friday)

    _MK
    Great video, of an amazing bike on perfect trails. IMHO the Spot could keep up here. This is the sort of trail the Spot is designed to ride is it not?

    I'm not saying I could keep up on my Spot though as jumps scare me, but the chunk and speed suits me fine

    Thanks for posting MK_

  25. #50
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    During the last few years, I have been riding HL Flux, 5Spot, 6Pack, DW 5Spot and Sultan and also had the opportunity to ride the new Burner enough to have an opinion.
    I must also comment that I do not ride aggressively fast any more but gnarly stuff and a lot of climb.
    IMHO I used to think that if you can only afford one bike the Turner 5Spot is the one, if you want a bike that climb but also shuttle downhill as well, a bike that can be built to suit your needs, a bike that is burly enough not to worry about when you are facing an ugly trail, the 5Spot is the ONE.
    But and always is a but you want a light bike that perform very well only uphill, a bling bike to impress your fellow riders no matter how it performs then the 5Spot it is not the ONE.
    In the other hand I must said that I moved to the 29er pack since I feel the stability and displacement is more suited to my ride style now days, I found in the Sultan the 5Spot big brother who lead me wherever my capacities can.
    The new Burner is an excellent balance of the both worlds. A cool geometry, very good climber, fast, light and with the benefits of the bigger wheels.
    And finally if you want a bike with a name and a company behind with a superlative customer support then ANY Turner could be the one.
    Take your pick
    In my workshop, dirty hands is a state of mind

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